D&D Does Digital Part III: PDFs
  • D&D Does Digital Part III: PDFs


    Today, Wizards of the Coast (WOTC) releases Portable Document Format (PDF) versions of much of its content, including both new products and older books from its back catalog, but it wasn't always that way. At one point, WOTC withdrew from the PDF market entirely. This article takes a look at the on-again, off-again relationship WOTC has with the PDF community.

    The "Bad Old Days"

    The company that owned the rights to Dungeons & Dragons was slow to embrace content delivered digitally. As often happens with the Internet, fans led the way with their own work. Frank Mentzer explained in an interview:

    In the Bad Old Days, TSR filed a lot legal actions against fans who tried to publish things that, in the opinion of TSR's lawyers, infringed on their property. But in 2000, WotC created the "Open Game License" (OGL), which changed all that. If another company published an adventure for the D&D game and simply included that License (a one-page thing), they didn't get sued. Wizards didn't have to beat up their fans to appease the lawyers

    For a comprehensive history of those legal actions, see Shannon Appelcline's excellent article, "Games & The Law, Part Seven: The D&D Dilemma." The OGL certainly made it easier for fan works to be distributed, and it may well have blurred the line for consumers as to what was owned by WOTC and what was open license. WOTC contributed quite a bit of content to the public beyond the core rule books, including the Epic Level Handbook, Deities and Demigods, parts of Unearthed Arcana, and the Expanded Psionics Handbook. Sites like D20SRD and later D20PFSRD made the game much more accessible by sharing these rules but reduced the need to purchase printed versions of the core rules. WOTC itself was slow to incorporate contributors to the OGL movement into its own work -- the razorboar and scorpionfolk in the Monster Manual II being a rare exception.

    PDFs were on the rise too. According to Matthew Sprange of Mongoose Publishing, role-playing games reached a digital tipping point in 2012, wherein customers were buying more electronic copies than print copies of books.

    The current RPG market is miserable. There really is no other word for it. I was talking to the owner of a certain well known RPG company just a little while ago, and he mentioned that he had sold a few hundred of his latest release. We agreed it was a good total in this day and age for the average RPG product (not saying his book was average but… oh, you get the point!). Then he dropped the bombshell; he had reliable information that his book had outsold the latest supplement of a very well known, not to mention market-leading, game. If the top tier games are selling at these levels, then something is seriously wonky in the market…On the other hand, RPG sales among PDFs, spearheaded by DrivethruRPG.com, are fairly booming. Which, of course, brings us to the inevitable question; is digital taking over?

    Sprange also shared that wargamers had not made the same transition as their tabletop role-player counterparts:

    What is really peculiar is that while a large number of roleplayers have embraced PDF books, wargamers have not – and the difference is staggering, especially when you consider the relative sizes of the two markets. And yet… to my addled mind at least, it makes more sense for miniatures games to be presented in PDF format. Instant updates, errata fully integrated into the core rules, every time; yet it seems miniatures gamers are just not keen on this new-fangled technology!

    The rise of electronic publishing was perhaps to be expected in light of the decay of the book publisher distribution chain, epitomized by the closure of Borders. Printing Impressions reported:

    According to the most recent wave of Affinity’s American Magazine Study surveys—which report the total magazine brand footprint across print, mobile and social platforms, as well as integrating magazine Website data from comScore’s Media Metrix—there are now 15 magazines generating larger digital audiences than print reader numbers.

    ICv2 confirmed that PDFs were over 20 percent of all tabletop role-playing game sales. It was good news for small press publishers who didn't have access to traditional print and distribution channels, but it came with a downside. The winding path of Dragon Magazine epitomized the pitfalls of digital publishing.

    The Dragon Unleashed

    The Dragon Magazine Archive was originally released in 1999 by TSR, detailing all the issues of Dragon Magazine from the first seven issues of The Strategic Review up through issue 250 in text-searchable PDF format. However, according to Wikipedia, a dispute over magazine publishing rights led to Kenzer & Co. acquiring the rights in a sort of swap to publish AD&D-compatible content through its HackMaster line:

    K&C acquired the rights to produce HackMaster after the Dragon Magazine Archive software was published where Wizards of the Coast failed to get permission to reprint many of the original articles such as the Knights of the Dinner Table comic in the electronic media archive. A lawsuit was settled out of court, and K&C started producing HackMaster afterwards.

    The bone of contention seemed to be over the rights that the authors of earlier issues signed with Dragon Magazine when they agreed to write for the publication. At the time, digital rights were not even considered and the contracts the authors signed were not inclusive of these rights. As a result, the legitimacy of publishing any print product in digital format was an open question – each author would have to renegotiate their contract with TSR, making the publication of any compilation precarious to say the least. The compilation is no longer for sale and currently retails for over $600 on Amazon.

    Dragon Magazine and its sister publications Dungeon and Polyhedron were back in the spotlight in 2013 when they were all uploaded to the Internet Archive. They were taken down shortly thereafter, as per the Internet Archive's Copyright Policy:

    The Internet Archive respects the intellectual property rights and other proprietary rights of others. The Internet Archive may, in appropriate circumstances and at its discretion, remove certain content or disable access to content that appears to infringe the copyright or other intellectual property rights of others.

    It was not the first time
    a magazine was put on Internet Archive without contributor or publisher permission:

    In a story at his Web site headed "What the heck is going on at Internet Archive?", author Steven Saylor noted, “Sometime in 2012, the entire run of Omni magazine was uploaded (and made downloadable) at Internet Archive.... Since those old issues must contain hundreds of works still under copyright by numerous contributors, how is this legal?" At least one contributor to the magazine, author Steve Perry, has publicly complained that he never gave permission for his work to be uploaded ("they didn't say a word in my direction"), and it has been noted that all issues containing the work of Harlan Ellison have apparently been taken down.

    It was clear that Internet consumers and publishing companies had very different views on sharing PDF content. The issue would eventually come to a head for WOTC in a legal battle that had far-reaching repercussions.

    WOTC Has Enough

    WOTC's tolerance for illegal PDFs was reached on April 6, 2009. RPGNow was instructed to stop the sale and downloads of all WOTC titles. That was just the beginning:

    Wizards of the Coast has instructed us to suspend all sales and downloads of Wizards of the Coast titles. Unfortunately, this includes offering download access to previously purchased Wizards of the Coast titles.

    On March 6, WOTC had previously announced its New Internet Sales Policy would be released on April 6, the same day as the mysterious removal of all WOTC PDFs. At 7:12 p.m. EST, Trevor Kidd, Community Team Member for WOTC, announced on the WOTC forums that:

    ...due to recent findings of illegal copying and online distribution (piracy) of our products, Wizards of the Coast has decided to cease the sales of online PDFs.

    Soon after, Paizo removed all WOTC PDFs as well. At approximately 8 p.m. EST, Paizo sent out a note to its customers indicating that:

    ...after April 6 at 11:59 PM Pacific time, Wizards of the Coast PDFs will no longer be available for purchase on http://paizo.com.

    After 12 p.m. PST on April 7, the note explained, customers would no longer be able to download Wizards of the Coast PDFs that were already purchased. Soon thereafter, WOTC issued a press release. In short, WOTC filed lawsuits against defendants in the U.S., Poland, and the Philippines for copyright infringement of its recently-released Dungeons & Dragons Player’s Handbook 2. The press release stated that:

    ...one or more of the defendants purchased digital copies of Player’s Handbook 2 and then illegally posted the copies onto popular file-sharing sites for free access and download by the general public.

    Greg Leeds, President of WOTC, explained in the press release that the company...

    ...brought these suits to stop the illegal activities of these defendants, and to deter future unauthorized and unlawful file-sharing.

    Wizards of the Coast PR Manager Tolena Thorburn told Ars Technica:

    In these lawsuits, which are public information, you would see that this specifically revolves around the players handbooks. They were released and, the same day, there were thousands of copies being downloaded illegally. It's very frustrating for us...It's a difficult problem to have, and it's one that plagues our industry. We didn't do this lightly, and we understand our fans enjoy that format. Most of the fans who have legally purchased PDFs are also customers who have the physical product. Until we have another digital solution, I think our fans at least are not being deprived of the product, and I think that's really important, that they have the product that they know and love.

    CJ Ovalle shared the other side of the story:

    WotC has sued 8 individuals- 5 named, 3 John Does- for copyright infringement. WotC put out a press release about their action (probably to show how serious they are about the problem). Like the *AA’s, WotC is suing its fanbase. One of the individuals has self-identified himself as a 16-year-old D&D player in the Philippines. Another, if his story is true, is a D&D player from Poland and is actually innocent of infringement (his friend uploaded the pdf to scribd without his knowledge). Being innocent of infringement is not particularly far-fetched, either, even if this person is lying- there are number of ways that this can occur. Lose your computer? Have your computer or a storage machine hacked? Edited the watermark? We’ve seen these types of things occur with other content industries already. WotC is suing these individuals for actual damages (the amount they’ve lost, which they also claim is unmeasurable in those same documents), and statutory damages (up to $150,000 per infringement).

    Customers fumed on RPG.net, ENWorld, Paizo, and WOTC’s own (soon to be discontinued) message boards, postulating as to the reason for the sudden change in policy. Two competing theories were put forth: that WOTC had launched its own digital initiative and was thus removing the competition, or that it was in direct response to illegal file sharing of WOTC electronic products. A poll on ENWorld’s forum argued that the revocation of the existing PDFs punished legitimate consumers and may have even encouraged piracy. At least two of the cases were settled:

    In one of three lawsuits brought by Wizards of the Coast LLC, a subsidiary of Hasbro Inc., U.S. District Judge Thomas S. Zilly on Friday accepted a settlement in which Thomas Patrick Nolan of Milton, Fla., agreed to a judgment against him of $125,000. In a settlement accepted by Zilly in July in a second Wizards lawsuit, Arthur Le of San Jose, Calif., agreed to pay $100,000 to the Hasbro Inc. subsidiary. Wizards has asked the judge to order that Le's co-defendant, Mike Becker of Bartlesville, Okla., pay $30,000 in damages and $14,616.75 in legal fees and costs. Becker has not responded to the lawsuit and was found in default in July, court filings show.

    D&D Insider Gives it a Try

    Dungeons & Dragons Insider (DDI) was WOTC's next attempt at managing PDFs. It was announced simultaneously with the cancellation of Paizo's license for Dungeon and Dragon magazine. Scott Rouse, Senior Brand Manager for D&D at the time, said of the move:

    Today the internet is where people go to get this kind of information. By moving to an online model we are using a delivery system that broadens our reach to fans around the world. Paizo has been a great partner to us over the last several years. We wish them well on their future endeavors.

    GameSpy explained
    the details:

    D&D Insider was announced at the 2007 GenCon as a five-part subscription-based electronic supplement to Dungeons & Dragons. Subscriptions will run $7.95 per month with discounts for three and 12-month commitments. Since that announcement, two of the five programs have started running in free trial mode. The company's two D&D magazines "Dragon" and "Dungeon" are available as 100% downloadable digital content. The "D&D Compendium" is a searchable online database covering every single rule and officially issued errata for feats, powers, magic items or any other technical issue that might need to be looked up in the course of a game. While currently far from complete, the Compendium's entries are growing every day.

    Dragon and Dungeon were both released in PDF format through D&D Insider. D&D Insider would continue to support both publications through the release of Fourth Edition D&D until October 2014:

    This month we want to share some upcoming changes to the DDI tool set and subscription. As we look to the future launch of D&D Next, we are shifting our focus to the development and support of the new rules set, which will impact the Dungeons & Dragons Insider subscription service. DDI will remain available to those who still wish to access all the great 4th Edition Magazines and Tools as part of the DDI subscription. Starting in March of 2014, the DDI tool set (Character Builder, Adventure Tools and Compendium), will no longer be updated with new 4th Edition game content. Existing issues of Dungeon magazine and Dragon magazine will continue to be offered for viewing.

    Why shut down D&D Insider? WOTC was beginning to shift their digital strategy from owning the platforms to leveraging third parties.

    The Return of the PDF

    Fans couldn't legally purchased PDFs for four years. It wasn't until January 2013 that Steve Wieck, COO of OneBookShelf, Inc., shared some very good news.

    Our goal with DriveThruRPG has always been to have every RPG ever made available 24/7 at a click. We can’t meet that goal without Wizards! We have been in constant dialogue with Wizards every year since we opened our virtual doors. Granted that from 2009 to 2011 there wasn’t a lot of dialogue to have, but as the next edition was announced and Wizards has geared up support for all prior editions, we started having constructive dialogue with the team at Wizards last year. It was a jaw-dropper for me when Wizards let us know that they had already collected hundreds upon hundreds of classic titles and had them all re-digitized at high resolution. Wizards had not been idle on the digital product front.

    The new site was DnDClassics.com. Laura Tommervik, Brand Manager at Wizards of the Coast, shared the company's excitement:

    We're very excited to once again offer our fans the option to purchase classic content as digital files. As technology continues to advance, our offerings continue to improve. All second edition and prior titles have been re-mastered with better quality scans and re-bookmarked. Scanning equipment has improved considerably over the last decade, and it was time to replace the scans created under the ESD program with all new scans. All third edition and forward titles are original digital files mastered from the original layout files. They include bookmarking and other PDF features.

    Better yet, the fans who had purchased WOTC titles four years ago had them restored:

    Customers who previously purchased Wizards titles at DriveThruRPG or RPGNow should know that as those titles are re-released, they can check their Library page on DriveThruRPG to get downloads of the new and improved files. Wizards has asked us to make sure that all previous DriveThruRPG and RPGNow purchasers get the updated files for free!

    A quick perusal of the site shows a wide range of editions are present on DNDClassics with one glaring exception: the core rule books for Fifth Edition.

    Where Are the Fifth Edition Core Rule Books?

    With the release of the Fifth Edition of D&D there was a lot of discussion about how WOTC would treat the Open Game License (OGL). We've already seen that the OGL paved the way for a deluge of Old School Renaissance (OSR) games that mimic older editions, which in turn helped bolster PDF sales of out of print books. But the three core rule books for Fifth Edition are conspicuously absent from the PDF market. Why?

    As we discussed in a previous article, going digital radically upends the support structures that stand between the creator and the consumer. These legacy institutions do not easily give up the revenue built into their existing models, which is why they fight tooth and nail to hold on to them. Chris Anderson at Wired explains why free is the future of business on the Web:

    It's now clear that practically everything Web technology touches starts down the path to gratis, at least as far as we consumers are concerned. Storage now joins bandwidth (YouTube: free) and processing power (Google: free) in the race to the bottom. Basic economics tells us that in a competitive market, price falls to the marginal cost. There's never been a more competitive market than the Internet, and every day the marginal cost of digital information comes closer to nothing.

    These changes most certainly apply to printed editions of tabletop role-playing games. WOTC has long known that D&D fans want PDFs of the core rule books. Mearls said as much in an Ask Me Anything (AMA) on Reddit:

    I can't say any specific about digital tools, but we're 100% committed to making them happen. I think the easiest way to make D&D fade would be to mistake the core thing about D&D with the way it's delivered. D&D has survived and thrived over the years because it engages the imagination and brings people together in a really unique way. It would be foolish to lose that by equating those things with physical books. Of course, people do like physical products and there's no reason to stop those, but the reverse is also true - we aren't making book lovers happy by pissing off people who want the game delivered digitally, with a robust set of tools.

    Mearls followed up with that interview with a surprising announcement:

    we just announced at the ACD distributor conference that about 15% of the Player's Handbook will be available for free as a PDF

    That was an oblique way of announcing the Basic version of Fifth Edition D&D would be released as a free PDF:

    Basic D&D is a PDF that covers the core of the game. It’s the equivalent of the old D&D Rules Cyclopedia, though it doesn’t have quite the same scope (for example, it won’t go into detail on a setting). It runs from levels 1 to 20 and covers the cleric, fighter, rogue, and wizard, presenting what we view as the essential subclass for each. It also provides the dwarf, elf, halfling, and human as race options. But the best part? Basic D&D is a free PDF. Anyone can download it from our website. We want to put D&D in as many hands as possible, and a free, digital file is the best way to do that.

    Wizards chose a middle path that released PDFs for free under the company's control while at the same time preserving core rulebooks for traditional print channels. That's still not the full set of core rules however. As we discussed in the last installment, Dungeonscape was originally going to include the core rules in a fully indexed format, but that plan collapsed when the program was cancelled. Instead, WOTC went with Fantasy Grounds. Polygon shared that Fantasy Grounds now had both the Player's Handbook and the Monster Manual integrated into its system, including support for The Lost Mine of Phandelver:

    Polygon has spent some time checking out the content in The Lost Mine module. Believe it or not, the entire experience, page-for-page, of the physical 5th edition D&D Starter Set is represented there. Beyond that, Fantasy Ground's modules even include annotated maps hotlinked to spawn enemies onto the grid, ready to roll initiative.

    It doesn't come cheap. The Core Class Pack (listed as WOTC5EPHBDELUXE in the URL) and the Core Monster Pack (listed as WOTC5EMMDELUXE) retails for $50. Another Polygon article describes just how much it costs to play D&D digitally:

    A single license of Fantasy Grounds is $40, while a four-pack is $120. For the traditional party of five players plus a Dungeon Master, that means spending $200 on the basic software. Then come the D&D modules themselves. You're looking at another $20 for your first campaign. Add on another $50 for the class pack and $50 for the monster pack, and now we're sitting at $320, or about $53 per person.

    Smiteworks chimed in on the pricing on ENWorld:

    The pricing for the FG Ultimate license is indeed $149. We added a subscription option for the same thing at $9.99 a month that we believe should be comparable with Mentor level access of Roll20. For a 1 month sub at $9.99 and the D&D Basic Rules and Theme pack at $2.99, you can try it out for a month with your group for a relatively cheap price. The 1-month sub comes with a bunch of monster tokens and some maps that should also help offset the cost, should you choose not to stay with FG beyond that time. We put a lot of attention and effort into making these modules as top notch as we could, though, so we hope you'll stick with it after you've gotten the hang of it. You can always enter in your own content and maps or copy from the books. If you decide you would rather have them pre-loaded, there is at least an option for that.

    We're still not at fully-indexed PDFs of the Player's Handbook, Dungeon Master's Guide, and Monster Manual -- at this point it seems WOTC has no plans in the near future to release core rule books in that format. For now, fans will have to make do with the basic rules and integrated rule sets for virtual table tops like Smiteworks.

    In the last installment we'll look at the virtual communities that support WOTC. For more in the D&D Does Digital series, please see:


    Mike "Talien" Tresca is a freelance game columnist, author, and communicator. You can follow him at Patreon.

    Comments 91 Comments
    1. Evenglare's Avatar
      Evenglare -
      What does this even mean?

      "Like the *AA’s, WotC is suing its fanbase. "

      Just for a helpful critique The WOTC HAS HAD ENOUGH part of the article is very confusing. It had some specific mentions about restricting PDFs then talks about PAIZO pulling PDFs and then in the next paragraph is talking about Wizards announcement of pulling the PDFs and then you go back to Paizo pulling PDFs... which you already established in the first paragraph, which is completely redundant and difficult to follow when forming a timeline in your head.

      Still very good article though.
    1. talien's Avatar
      talien -
      Quote Originally Posted by Evenglare View Post
      Just for a helpful critique The WOTC HAS HAD ENOUGH part of the article is very confusing. It had some specific mentions about restricting PDFs then talks about PAIZO pulling PDFs and then in the next paragraph is talking about Wizards announcement of pulling the PDFs and then you go back to Paizo pulling PDFs... which you already established in the first paragraph, which is completely redundant and difficult to follow when forming a timeline in your head.

      Still very good article though.
      Thank you for this, it was an error on my part. I fixed it so it's hopefully more clear!
    1. JohnLynch's Avatar
      JohnLynch -
      Removing the PDFs was always about trying to kill 3.5e by removing all support it could for that edition and never had anything to do with piracy. Every single 4e product was made available by pirates.
    1. Evenglare's Avatar
      Evenglare -
      Quote Originally Posted by JohnLynch View Post
      Removing the PDFs was always about trying to kill 3.5e by removing all support it could for that edition and never had anything to do with piracy. Every single 4e product was made available by pirates.
      Absolutely. It's mind boggling that wizards pulled them on the basis of Piracy. I.. I mean surely they know scanning and text recognition exists ... right? Wizards just seem largely behind the times when it comes to this kind of thing. They simply can't handle almost anything digitally and that really is telling. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE 5th edition, wizards are great designers but terrible at technology current tech. The fact that you can go to Paizo's site and get a wealth of downloadable digital titles really really shows how bad wizards is behind it's direct competitor.

      Getting back to what I was trying to convey... I can't imagine that the staff is that completely in the dark about this stuff. Video game devs have been trying to stop pirates using more and more complex DRM, but literally in 99.9999999% of cases hackers figure it out and the game is then distributed everywhere within a month or so if it's REALLY challenging DRM. Pirates are going to find a way to get stuff for free, its just a fact.

      The DRM mentioned above is analogous to Wizards pdf takedown. We now are starting to feel the wind change in the devs opinion to use DRM or Pulling PDFs from rampant fear of pirates. As far as games go... instead of punishing players with invasive DRM developers have been rewarding people who buy the games, look at witcher 3, CDProjekt Red is AMAZING. It feels as if wizards may be turning around too. We did get Basic for free anyway.... Still the thing is that you can go on the net and take about... a min to explore and find a scanned OCR 5e PHB, MM, and DMG. It's a trivial search. If a company cracks down and doesn't let consumers buy their stuff, then they are going to be driven to pirate. It's just a fact.

      People like want to pay money, and no one wants to take it which is super frustrating. As a result of all of this, wizards doesn't make money, pirates still pirate (slightly slower but they do) and the majority of people who want digital are left out in the rain. As soon wizard made that choice they were condemned to a lose lose situation where only pirates win. You could probably make the argument that wizards actually fostered the pirate culture bringing in new people which in turn are going to find out how to pirate more efficiently.
    1. Cody C. Lewis's Avatar
      Cody C. Lewis -
      Please pay attention Wizards, as the solution is right under your nose.

      Problem: How does a publisher provide digital content to it's end users without the risk of piracy eating away at the profitability?

      Solution: A DRM'd application. Simple. Powerful. Do NOT print out a pdf with bookmarks and leave yourself vulnerable to a quick watermark removal and upload to a file sharing website. Instead you have complete control over the product. People make the assumption that all piracy is born from someone being too cheap to pay for material; or worse they assume that all piracy directly leads to a lost customer, and lost revenue. This is not true.

      It may be some of one or both of those, but in my experience piracy is borne from necessity. The desire to have a product in the format you want it in, is what has lead to piracy more than people would have you believe.

      Let's look at what was mentioned above by @Evenglare. He is absolutely correct that DRM will always be defeated. He is also correct that all of the 5e products are available right now on certain websites. Seriously, right now you can have everything WotC has produced for 5e including maps, D&D Next adventures, a compiled Unearthed Arcana, and even the D&D Expeditions stuff in one simple torrent.

      Think about that. Now let's approach this logically.
      1.) WotC wants to protect their IP and has not released any capabilities to obtain their 5e books digitally (with the exclusion of Fantasy Grounds), in order to protect themselves from piracy.
      2.) Online Piracy has EVERYTHING WotC has produced for 5e, D&D Next, subcontract cartographers, online articles, and free releases made exclusively for brick and mortar stores, available, right now, thus rendering WotC's reason to not supply digital product moot.
      3.) So we can safely assume that if people want to buy the books, they have done so. We can also assume that people who want to pirate the material, have done so. Finally we can see that the only group left are in fact, the people who want to pay money to WotC for digital product, but have no way to do so.

      I have a print copy of every single release WotC has made for 5e (and I am checking everyday for the Out of the Abyss DM Screen to hit Amazon). It looks beautiful on my shelves. If I could have bought the products on my tablet/android app, I would have bought both. Wizards could learn from WoW. They are not f2p. They still get subs. But instead of JUST giving people the ability to sub, they have created a way for those who would spend more money than just the $15/month they are going to, to do so. They can spend the $15/month AND buy a character transfer or a level boost or a whatever whatever (IDK as I actually never played WoW past the trial periods).

      Do you want to know the one thing I have NOT been able to see online anywhere for 5e material though?

      The damn Dragon+ magazines. And it is the ONLY thing I haven't seen.

      So make an app Wizards. Not a PDF. Move to a sub service like Windows is planning to do to beat piracy. Or set it up like the DC Comics / Marvel / Amazon Kindle / Nook / Comixology apps. All you have to say is: "if for any reason we have to close the servers for the app, we will make previously purchased material available to our users in a downloadable pdf format". And please, hire a different company than the one who vastly over-complicated the Dragon+ app. I still cannot get the app to not crash on my Note 4 and can only read it on my tablet.
    1. Morrus's Avatar
      Morrus -
      That's exactly what DungeonScape was supposed to do.
    1. Nagol's Avatar
      Nagol -
      Quote Originally Posted by dakotahorn View Post
      Please pay attention Wizards, as the solution is right under your nose.

      Given that

      (1) All DRM can be broken

      and

      (2) DRM on content that is valued by an audience and is used to prevent a portion of that audience access has an incentive to be broken that correlates to the size of the excluded audience.

      Your conclusion is iffy.

      The reason Dragon+ isn't available is because the size of excluded audience is very small -- it is free after all so the only excluded parties are those that don't have an appropriate device or emulator.

      Moving a for-charge product into an app means there is a larger incentive to break the DRM and release the contents to the much larger potential audience (those that can't operate the app + those who would acquire the contents only at a lower threshold price).
    1. delericho's Avatar
      delericho -
      Quote Originally Posted by dakotahorn View Post
      Please pay attention Wizards, as the solution is right under your nose.

      Problem: How does a publisher provide digital content to it's end users without the risk of piracy eating away at the profitability?

      Solution: A DRM'd application.
      ...

      And please, hire a different company than the one who vastly over-complicated the Dragon+ app. I still cannot get the app to not crash on my Note 4 and can only read it on my tablet.
      If WotC can't find a contractor to do a working D+ app, what makes you think they'll do any better for the core rulebooks? Their record on digital offerings is really not good.

      IMO, WotC should stop trying to reinvent the wheel, and just get on and offer the watermarked PDFs that people actually want. Or don't offer anything at all. Either way, they're not going to stop piracy, whatever they try.
    1. Cody C. Lewis's Avatar
      Cody C. Lewis -
      Quote Originally Posted by Nagol View Post
      Given that

      (1) All DRM can be broken

      and

      (2) DRM on content that is valued by an audience and is used to prevent a portion of that audience access has an incentive to be broken that correlates to the size of the excluded audience.

      Your conclusion is iffy.

      The reason Dragon+ isn't available is because the size of excluded audience is very small -- it is free after all so the only excluded parties are those that don't have an appropriate device or emulator.

      Moving a for-charge product into an app means there is a larger incentive to break the DRM and release the contents to the much larger potential audience (those that can't operate the app + those who would acquire the contents only at a lower threshold price).
      But what is the concern with broken DRM of an app if all of the material is already available through piracy right now anyway?
    1. darjr's Avatar
      darjr -
      Do NOT want an app.
    1. Cody C. Lewis's Avatar
      Cody C. Lewis -
      Quote Originally Posted by delericho View Post
      ...



      If WotC can't find a contractor to do a working D+ app, what makes you think they'll do any better for the core rulebooks? Their record on digital offerings is really not good.

      IMO, WotC should stop trying to reinvent the wheel, and just get on and offer the watermarked PDFs that people actually want. Or don't offer anything at all. Either way, they're not going to stop piracy, whatever they try.
      Because no one has ever failed before they eventually succeeded right?
      It is a silly thought that because Wizards has one or ten or thirty poorly written apps, that they will never be able to produce one that is good.
    1. Cody C. Lewis's Avatar
      Cody C. Lewis -
      Quote Originally Posted by darjr View Post
      Do NOT want an app.
      Ok, I teach a sales class in regards to finding the true objection. May I ask why you do not want an app?
    1. Jester David's Avatar
      Jester David -
      I've been spoiled by Paizo.
      It's soooo handy being able to have my tablet open and searching a PDF. Or referencing a statblock there and a different one in a physical book. Or having the adventure open in two places. Or reading and prepping for a game at work (during my break of course). Playing in my 5e game is hard enough without a quick PDF or app to skim through. When I start fully DMing 5e in a few months it's going to be awkward.

      Official PDFs (at a reasonable price) would be so nice.
    1. delericho's Avatar
      delericho -
      Quote Originally Posted by dakotahorn View Post
      Because no one has ever failed before they eventually succeeded right?
      WotC have a long history of failed digital projects. They've shown that they're just not very good at them - and there's no reason they should be, given that they're a game company not a software company. (Rather more puzzling is their seeming inability to find good contractors, but that seems to be an issue also.)

      It is a silly thought that because Wizards has one or ten or thirty poorly written apps, that they will never be able to produce one that is good.
      If there was no cost associated with generating those apps, it wouldn't be a problem. But each attempt costs them money and further delays the eventual release of the PDFs people actually want - neither of which is a trivial concern.
    1. Cody C. Lewis's Avatar
      Cody C. Lewis -
      Quote Originally Posted by delericho View Post
      WotC have a long history of failed digital projects. They've shown that they're just not very good at them - and there's no reason they should be, given that they're a game company not a software company. (Rather more puzzling is their seeming inability to find good contractors, but that seems to be an issue also.)



      If there was no cost associated with generating those apps, it wouldn't be a problem. But each attempt costs them money and further delays the eventual release of the PDFs people actually want - neither of which is a trivial concern.
      Both points are valid; but neither change my opinion.
      At the end of the day, paper products are shrinking. Having a company decide that the cost of innovation is too much of a risk rather than waiting it out is how Blockbuster went out of business. Netflix innovated and blazed its own path (Mailing DVDs), and then, gambled again with streaming, and now has gambled again with producing its own shows. They are thriving.

      My 2 year old son will never know what blockbuster is.
    1. delericho's Avatar
      delericho -
      Quote Originally Posted by dakotahorn View Post
      Both points are valid; but neither change my opinion.
      At the end of the day, paper products are shrinking. Having a company decide that the cost of innovation is too much of a risk rather than waiting it out is how Blockbuster went out of business.
      Good thing I didn't advocate waiting it out, then. Indeed, I'm advocating the opposite - that instead of waiting around in the hope they'll eventually develop a working app, they should instead embrace the technology that is already proven and working.
    1. Koloth's Avatar
      Koloth -
      Two main problems with DRM'd 'as a service' apps.
      1. You have little control over what they do and how they do it. I don't want some WOTC app reporting back to WOTC central on what I play, when I play, who I play with, and what I use my device(s) for when I am not playing.
      2. The cloud may not be available, rendering your purchase useless for a time. One of our players had that happen when my wireless router went EOL. He couldn't get to his web based rules set. The rest of us with our paper copies had no problem.

      As to why wargamers are less adoptive of PDF or 'as a service' stuff, the complexity of the rules might be a reason. If you are playing a RPG fighter type, you really only need to know fighter rules and basic combat stuff. If you are playing Star Fleet Battles, even at a basic level, you need to know a much larger set of rules. One of the ways a lot of wargamers learn the rules is by opening the rule book to a random page and read while Stargate plays in the background. And sadly, most screen devices are poor substitutes for books when it comes to random reading.
    1. darjr's Avatar
      darjr -
      Versatility. A PDF I can use everywhere. I can even print it out in a format that resembles its original format. I can cut and paste from it. I can read it on my kindle. The readers on all these are now fairly robust. Finally an app isn't for my benefit but the companies, tracking and data gathering and snooping.
    1. Nagol's Avatar
      Nagol -
      Quote Originally Posted by dakotahorn View Post
      But what is the concern with broken DRM of an app if all of the material is already available through piracy right now anyway?
      You had the concern:
      Problem: How does a publisher provide digital content to it's end users without the risk of piracy eating away at the profitability?
      The balancing act for providers is how to limit piracy of content. In the worst case, piracy causes the content provider to fail and/or stop providing content (see Ozark Software and M.U.L.E.). In the best case, piracy causes no lost revenue and acts as a form of advertising (see Tecnobrega music). Like so much in life, almost all content providers fall into a middle ground.

      Each provider must strive to limit the actual income damage caused by piracy. If a pirate would refuse to pay for the work at any price, they gain from the piracy, but the content provider does not lose from it so there is no actual loss. There are other drivers though. Some people pirate because (a) they can't get legitimate versions, (b) are willing to pay something but not the current listed price, (c) want to look before committing to purchase.

      To minimize income loss, strive to make (a) tiny -- make the content available as universally as possible, ignore or promote (c) as a marketing tool, and try to minimize (b) to setting the price at the sweet spot on the demand curve. Also, consider offering differentiated products -- strip out the art and sell at a lower price point for those that want the text only. In other words, minimise the size of the potential pirate audience.

      Only after that, bother with DRM. DRM automatically increases the potential pirate pool by increasing (a) and if the pool is large enough, it offers no at most very limited protection.
    1. darjr's Avatar
      darjr -
      DRM punishes your customers and does not hinder piracy. Even steams service can be punishing to customers if they can't get on line.
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