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    Here at EN World, I'm looking at all-ages tabletop role-playing games, board games, and card games. Do they engage the players at the kids' gaming table? Would they cut it at the adults' table? Are they genuinely fun for every age? A Friend In Need by Jenny Jarzabski from Playground Adventures is a 26-page "stand-alone mini-adventure for [Ö] 1st level characters. Recommended for ages six and up, this module includes adventure content as well as advice for gaming with children." While this review covers the Pathfinder version of the adventure, there is also a 5e version available.


    If you want to experience mysteries in Tales from the Loop, Our Friends the Machines is for you. This full color 104 page hardcover includes three complete adventures, eight short adventure locations based on classic 80s songs, four iconic machines from the world of the Loop including blueprints, and a guide to creating your own setting for the game, complete with the Norfolk Broads, a UK-based Loop.


    Apocalypse World is the first game to use what we now call the Apocalypse World Engine, published in 2010. It's an innovative system that builds the world as part of character creation, and where the GM (here called the MC) has essentially the same rules as every other player. The second edition of the game was Kickstarted in 2016, and brought the game a bit more in line with the dozens of games that came after.


    I reviewed Eloy Lasanta of Third Eye Games' Pip System Corebook on EN World, interviewed him about his AMP Year Four Kickstarter, and talked about my brief run-in with him at AndoCon. Every Third Eye game I've tried has improved my gaming table. With that in mind, when he sent the quickstart for his latest project and Kickstarter, Part-Time Gods 2nd Edition, I knew I wanted to try it out.


    Some RPGs are suited to telling a tight story, and some work best in a sandbox where players can explore and adventure as they please. The Elite: Dangerous RPG definitely falls into the latter category.


    Today we're going to get a little paranoid with the West End Games original edition of Paranoia.


    A few months ago I saw a cover for a new role-playing game that was about to hit DriveThruRPG that really grabbed my attention. It was The Shivering Circle, a self-published game by Howard David Ingham delving into the folk horror genre popularized by such consummately British movies like the original Wicker Man or Witchfinder General. For me, however, the connection was more to a British children's show that I caught in American rebroadcast when I was younger called The Children of the Stones.


    Brave travellers journey between the stars in the Traveller Starter Set, for the second edition of the science fiction role-playing game published by Mongoose Publishing. By the end of the campaign, all players will know the rules and understand how starships and technology fit into the game. They will also discover the core concept that Travellers travel for personal reasons and achieving their goals is the reward and motivation for seeking personal connections, equipment, and/or wealth.


    It seems like Russia is everywhere these days. Old Cold War paranoias are resurfacing. Combine that with the 80's aesthetic revival reflected in new games like Tales From The Loop, Unmasked and Sigmata: This Signal Kills Facsists, it looks like it might be time to dust off an old forgotten gem.


    Funded for just over $10K internet bucks, chances are good you missed out the Shattered Dawn Kickstarter by Shattered Tabletop Games. While Iíve written plenty of reviews the last couple of years, itís rare that I find myself immediately contacting the publisher about the material, within the very first pass. I reached out to ensure that the print copies of the Shattered Dawn Player Guide & the Archmaster Guide, were representative of the finished product. Through a brief email exchange, it was confirmed that my copy was consistent with the final products.


    Here at EN World, I'm looking at all-ages tabletop role-playing games, board games, and card games. Do they engage the players at the kids' gaming table? Would they cut it at the adults' table? Are they genuinely fun for every age? Tiny Dungeon: Second Edition from Gallant Knight Games "is the newest iteration of the minimalist fantasy roleplaying game!" While this is a minimalist system, the book is not as it rings in at 209 pages of rules, monsters, microsettings, and GM tips.


    Beyond the world of mortal ken lies another, a nightmare world of profane alien gods, nightmarish tomes of eldritch lore, bloodlines tainted by elder secrets, and forgotten places whose existence makes a mockery of established history. You will find a world where Cthulhu dreams no longer in his house at Rílyeth in Leagues of Cthulhu.


    There has been a lot of releases from Monte Cook Games over the last few months, as books come out and Kickstarter funded projects roll out, as it looks like the company is clearing the decks for the release this summer of their big project, Invisible Sun. Today, I am going to look at a couple of releases for the more generic version of their house system, the Cypher System game. This is going to be an MCG two-fer as I talk about the Expanded Worlds and Unmasked supplements.


    There are some role-playing games that aim to strip out complexity wherever possible - in the rules, in character creation, even in the setting itself. And then there are those like the Infinity RPG Core Book which choose to embrace it; to lean into a universe stuffed to the brim with backstory and try to lay down mechanics for everything it throws at you.


    Itís been five years since I first read Savage Worlds and until rather recently my experience was left to that of an appreciative reader. Iím certain some of you know this experience. You have something and want to run (or play), and paid good money for it, but everyone in your group is non-pulsedÖ Thatís recently changed since my longtime friend and Fantasy Grounds GM introduced Savage Rifts (reviewed here) and Deadlands into our somewhat regular sessions. This Review is a brief delve into Deadlands Players and Marshals, Reloaded handbooks for Savage Worlds.


    The Black Blade of the Demon King is an old school adventure/setting supplement from Knight Owl Publishing that attempts to recapture the madcap energy of fantasy role-playing modules from the early 1980s. Does it? Let's talk about it.


    Many comic book universes have undergone a revamp that updates heroes and clears out any complex continuity. The New 52, Rebirth, All-New All-Different Marvel: the list goes on. Now we see the pre-eminent super-hero game get a similar treatment with Green Ronin's Freedom City 3rd edition for the Mutants & Masterminds game. Is this the perfect jumping on point, or do changes make things difficult for users? Read on and find out!


    Spirit of 77 is a combination of street racers and kung-fu fighters, cross-country road races, and big scores in the big city with a killer '70s soundtrack. If you have ever wanted to cross paths with Bigfoot and punch him right in the face because heís asking for it, then Spirit of 77 is for you.


    One of the people that I game with locally has been running a game over the last few months of Gaslight Call of Cthulhu for the group of us at our monthly get together. As a backer of the Kickstarter, he has been using the Hudson and Brand setting by Stygian Fox as the foundation of our game. Because of this I picked up the company's new The Book of Contemporary Magical Things.


    The grizzled warrior sitting across from me squinted at me with his one good eye, I assume trying to size me up with his intuition. "Are you calling me a fossil?" The scars on his arms leered at me, looking as if their very history would reach out any moment and strike me. "Uh, no. I was asking if you have any tomes on dinosaurs?" I tried to swallow my whiskey with a confidence I wasn't feeling.

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