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August 19, 1974 (43)
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Pathfinder 2 Character Sheet #1: Fumbus, Goblin Alchemist Saturday, 14th July, 2018 06:40 PM

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Friday, 13th June, 2014


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Tuesday, 5th June, 2018


Saturday, 2nd June, 2018


Monday, 14th May, 2018

  • 05:55 PM - Morrus quoted Melkor in post I will answer 10 questions about Mordenkainen's Tome
    Does the first section detailing the Blood War provide enough info to run a Planescape campaign (or provide any tantalizing hints that we might see future Planescape products for 5E)? It doesn't detail Sigil, so I'd guess no. I've never run a PS campaign though, so I'm not super qualified to judge what's needed to run one.

Thursday, 10th May, 2018

  • 01:49 PM - jasper quoted Melkor in post 12 new monster images revealed from Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes!
    I'm not a fan of the Eladrin ears. Never was a fan of the Giff. The Abashai and tall smoke monster look great, though, and I am looking forward to the book. Giff sounds like the younger brother of Biff. In fact Giff was beaten up Marty McFly and Biff in the only bonding moment they ever had.

Tuesday, 28th November, 2017

  • 11:11 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Melkor in post Sword & Sorcery vs. Heroic Fantasy
    I guess its natural to try and define the genre before discussing rules. If you look at the genre exemplars - Tolkien for 'high fantasy' and REH for S&S, you see nothing remotely like FR or Greyhawk in either case. D&D has never done a great job of genre emulation, it's mostly done a terrible job. FR's high-magic isn't high fantasy, it's a D&Dism, borderline monty haul, almost. Greyhawk's dungeons full of mismatched monsters and arbitrary magical traps weren't S&S, they were another oddity born of D&D, the game, not of a genre. FWIW. That said, I think the intent of listing "Heroic Fantasy" for Toril, and "Sword & Sorcery" for Oerth in the DMG was probably to divide the genres between "high magic and fantastical" and "low magic and gritty." Assuming that is the thought process behind why Mearls, Crawford, and Perkins wrote that section the way that they did, how do you think the actual rules be different in a low-magic, grittier setting? They don't need to vary the rules much ...

Friday, 24th November, 2017

  • 11:39 AM - Henry quoted Melkor in post Sword & Sorcery vs. Heroic Fantasy
    In a lot of Sword & Sorcery, magic is distrusted/something to be feared, and often used by the evil characters in the story rather than the hero. PCs with access to unlimited cantrips wouldn't really fit the bill in tales like that. That’s always been my take, as well. The protagonist of a S&S story may even have magic-using allies (Conan’s Pelias, for example), but it is uncommon; they themselves rarely use magic, and swordplay or steely determination wins out in the end over wizardly tricks.

Thursday, 23rd November, 2017

  • 11:42 PM - Lehrbuch quoted Melkor in post Sword & Sorcery vs. Heroic Fantasy
    In a lot of Sword & Sorcery, magic is distrusted/something to be feared, and often used by the evil characters in the story rather than the hero. PCs with access to unlimited cantrips wouldn't really fit the bill in tales like that. That doesn't seem right to me. Elric of Melnibone is a pretty genre defining work of Sword & Sorcery and both Elric and numerous other characters have access to lots of magic. Likewise Lord of the Rings is a genre defining work of Epic Fantasy. However, while there is a lot of magic in the story, most of the protagonists don't cast spells, most magic is in the form of items...and the whole plot is driven by the fear and distrust the good characters have of the corrupting influence of powerful magic.
  • 07:57 PM - Satyrn quoted Melkor in post Sword & Sorcery vs. Heroic Fantasy
    In a lot of Sword & Sorcery, magic is distrusted/something to be feared, and often used by the evil characters in the story rather than the hero. PCs with access to unlimited cantrips wouldn't really fit the bill in tales like that. I'd think PCs with any sort of reliable magic wouldn't really fit that bill. :p
  • 03:58 PM - Lehrbuch quoted Melkor in post Sword & Sorcery vs. Heroic Fantasy
    ...Do you think there would be changes (or at least slight modifications) to the core rules to support a more Sword & Sorcery genre? First, I've never understood the idea that some seem to have that the "Sword & Sorcery" genre has less magic in it. "Sorcery" is even in the name. I think that there is a continuum along which lies "Heroic" and "Sword & Sorcery" (and "Epic" and "Mythic"). I don't think that there needs to be any rule changes to support each of these genres. The changes are more about the types of Adventures and the types of characters. But it is very loose. It's not about changes in rules, or even changes in plot, it is changes in the story. For example, if the plot of a whole campaign was "a small band of mercenaries, caught up in a continent at war, have a series of episodic Adventures that culminate in a confrontation against the bickering gods responsible for the war". Then I see that campaign unfolding in any of the genres of "Heroic", "Sword & Sorcery", "Epic",...
  • 03:58 AM - Parmandur quoted Melkor in post Sword & Sorcery vs. Heroic Fantasy
    Thanks for the responses folks. If I remember correctly, the original Grey Box Forgotten Realms felt darker, grittier, and more low-magic than later Realms material as well. On one hand, yes; on the other hand, Greenwood's original has Aslan and Narnia built into it. FR started up as fan-fic gumbo, which you could also argue if Greyhawk, but Gygax had decidedly more Sword & Sorcery influences by volume.

Wednesday, 22nd November, 2017

  • 10:23 PM - ccs quoted Melkor in post Sword & Sorcery vs. Heroic Fantasy
    Page 68 of the DMG notes that Toril (Forgotten Realms) is Heroic-Fantasy setting while Oerth (Greyhawk) is a Sword & Sorcery setting. Maybe they're aiming to make the 5e version of Greyhawk a S&S setting. But that's not the general vibe it's had in any other edition. You know all that High Fantasy stuff FR is known for? Well, before FR was made the flagship setting we did all that on the GH map. All your shiny stuff in the FR comes from GH.... The difference between GH & FR? One has several hundred novels, a score of computer games, & a setting book published for every country/region. The other doesn't.

Thursday, 25th June, 2015

  • 09:45 PM - EzekielRaiden quoted Melkor in post What do you think Wizard's preferred customer is like and what are his/her buying habits?
    I can only say it is probably not me. Pretty much this. I was originally going to say, "I have genuinely no idea at this point," but I was failing to consider that I'm fairly sure of some things it isn't. Heh. Probably, ‘casuals’ is a better term for ‘slackers’. Eh...both are used in rather negative contexts quite often. "Casual" may not be as inherently negative as "slacker," but if we're trying for positive language it's not exactly ideal either. Particularly because it's entirely possible to consider yourself a "D&D fan/player" while meeting whatever definition of "casual" you have--I probably would, despite being a forum-frequenter, because of how rare play opportunities have been for me.

Tuesday, 23rd June, 2015

  • 04:42 PM - Troll Lord quoted Melkor in post Free RPG Day Round Up
    Thanks for the Free RPG day module. One thing I noticed about it was that there is a situation early in the module where a Fighter uses a DEX check to sneak down a hill and his level is added to the check. Based on all of the years I have played C&C, I have always been under the impression that a Fighter would never add his level to a check like that based on Move Silently being a Rogue ability that the fighter doesn't have. Other than that, I thought that the adventure really relies way too heavily on Ability Checks - and as an adventure kind of geared towards new players, that kind of sets a bad precedent for the style of old school gaming that C&C tends to emulate. Granted, players and CKs should be able to run any kind of game they want, it just seemed excessive on initial read through. Melkor, Holy carolina. Nice catch. Your right the fighter should have been added his level to that attribute check. I'll amend that for the release on July 1, turning it into an example of when characters do NOT add levels to their checks. Thanks! As for the number of attribute checks, that was really intentional on my part. I've found that running C&C games at cons, if I'll inundate players new to the game with attribute checks . . . my favorite is to have them cross a river swollen with rain water . . . then it quickly teaches them the ease and versatility of the SIEGE Engine. That's what Shadows of A Green Sky was shooting, lots of checks, lots of repeated descriptions. The hope being by the time you've played it, the attribute check system as been explained so many times you have it memorized. And that fighter sneaking thing you pointed out is the perfect addition to that. I am pushing this onto our other games as well, Open and Play Basic for Amazing Adventures and Victorious...

Sunday, 12th April, 2015

  • 09:43 PM - Aimian_Silverflash quoted Melkor in post So.... hide?
    If the Rogue is hiding behind the friendly Fighter, does he have to move (at least 5') out from behind the fighter in order to shoot his bow at an enemy? If so, is he still hidden when he moves out from behind the fighter? PHB, Pg. 177, Left Column under Hiding states: "In combat, most creatures stay alert for signs of danger all around, so if you come out of hiding and approach a creature, it usually sees you. However, under certain circumstances, the Dungeon Master might allow you to stay hidden as you approach a creature that is distracted, allowing you to gain advantage on an attack before you are seen." PHB, Pg. 182, Right Column states: "When travelling at a slow pace, the characters can move stealthily. As long as they're not in the open, they can try to surprise or sneak by other creatures they encounter." So the player's basically says... ask your DM. Obviously it should be considered that you are not approaching. You're just popping out to shoot. But you ARE poppin...
  • 09:36 PM - fjw70 quoted Melkor in post So.... hide?
    If the Rogue is hiding behind the friendly Fighter, does he have to move (at least 5') out from behind the fighter in order to shoot his bow at an enemy? If so, is he still hidden when he moves out from behind the fighter? He doesn't need to move. The rules allow shooting through someone else's space, but the enemy would have cover. Whether he is still hidden if he moves out from the concealment the fighter gives him is not addressed directly in the rules. I would say he is no long hidden the moment he reveals himself (unless the enemies are distracted and focusing their attention elsewhere). Some DMs would say he can get off a shoot before he is revealed.

Thursday, 26th March, 2015

  • 07:35 PM - Riley37 quoted Melkor in post A lich must periodically feed souls to its phalactery...
    You should have seen the discussions at our table around Stealth and Hiding in 5E. "'But the discord of Melkor rose in uproar and contended with it, and again there was a war of sound more violent than before, until many of the Ainur were dismayed and sang no longer, and Melkor had the mastery.' Your quote indicates that though the discussion around Stealth and Hiding was "more violent than before", you ended up with mastery of how to apply Stealth and Hiding in 5E D&D. Congratulations! As for giant snakes and You-Know-Who... the horcrux is a completely innovative idea, a breakthrough; if it were just the same thing as a phylactery, why would Rowling have invented the word "horcrux"?
  • 02:58 PM - Reynard quoted Melkor in post A lich must periodically feed souls to its phalactery...
    I agree wholeheartedly. Unfortunately, the last decade and-a-half of D&D for us made it hard to try and look at the game from a different angle. A rules set that is left a bit more vague and open to DM interpretation. You should have seen the discussions at our table around Stealth and Hiding in 5E. At least the ones that dominated discussion forums were just ridiculous -- it was like everyone's goal was to invent cracks in the rules to somehow prove 5E was not as good as [insert favorite edition here]. I for one am very pleased that the designers finally remembered there is a human behind the screen, not a random number generator and results output machine. You can hide when the DM says you can hide. Sure, you can use the rules as a basis for an argument (along with precedent and just plain common sense) but in the end the guy behind the screen is making the final call, not the rule book. If it is your regular play group, those circumstances resolve themselves as table rules pretty quickl...

Wednesday, 29th October, 2014

  • 06:42 PM - Joe Liker quoted Melkor in post Attacking from Stealth. When you can / cant Hide - A thorough breakdown
    It bothers me that the ambiguity of the rules as written requires this level of effort to try and make sense of. Nah, the rules as written make sense, and they work fine. It only becomes a problem when DMs think their only means of shutting down a blatantly exploitative player is to read rules at them. The 5e rules are not written with punctilious rigor in mind, so such a rigorous analysis as we see in this thread is bound to collapse. In 5e, the DM is supposed to adjudicate stealth pretty much every time. Mearls has indicated this in nearly those exact terms, so I'm a little mystified why the discussion continues as if a closer reading of the rules can eventually result in perfect, DM-proof, algorithmic clarity.


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Melkor's Downloads

  Filename Total Downloads Rating Files Uploaded Last Updated
Old School 4E Character Sheet (Goldenrod) - Now with Power Cards
I've been working on an old-school look-and-feel character sheet for 4E that resembles the old AD&D Goldenrod sheets. I know that the Character Builder tends to make handwritten character sheets seem a bit obsolete, but I enjoy using them nonetheless...
1022 0 2 Tuesday, 12th November, 2013, 02:15 AM Tuesday, 12th November, 2013, 02:15 AM

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