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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 17th May, 2019, 07:45 PM
    Probably a game based in a culture with strong restrictions/expectation for gendered roles AND where the genre emulated reinforces this societal position. Something like a game based on Pride and Prejudice (but not the infinitely improved Pride and Prejudice and Zombies).
    32 replies | 551 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 17th May, 2019, 11:12 AM
    Ghosts of Motley Hall -- a troupe of ghosts from different times confined to a manor house Sapphire and Steel -- a sort of Twilight Zone-ish show about two probably non-human agents who "repair" temporal/dimensional problems often to the detriment of those caught up in them Not the Nine O'clock News -- an ensemble comedy skit show
    35 replies | 1109 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Thursday, 16th May, 2019, 04:18 PM
    Clear cookies probably?
    3 replies | 127 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Wednesday, 15th May, 2019, 05:13 PM
    It's not escaping towards them, they are inside the event horizon so light is falling over them like water in a shower on its way deeper into the hole. The event horizon is the surface of a sphere some distance from the singularity point (the more massive the hole, the farther the surface of the sphere from centre of mass). Nothing is really there other than gravity at sufficient force levels...
    433 replies | 17438 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Wednesday, 15th May, 2019, 05:11 PM
    There would be tidal stress effects on the hull though, but that would be "pushing out" (actually linear stretching stress as opposed to expansion) as opposed to "pressing in". The ship needs to be designed to support a minimal amount of analogous "pushing out" from air pressure so I could wink at external pressure being a greater risk. It just has to be a *very* big black hole to drop the...
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 13th May, 2019, 07:23 PM
    It's not 3e. Rich had a post about that when 4e came out. People were asking if the strip would go through a period of "World change" like 3,0 to 3.5 had way back at the beginning of the strip. Rich said it was inspired by particular RPG editions, but he felt comfortable including things from whatever source was interesting.
    6 replies | 218 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 13th May, 2019, 05:24 PM
    Probably a high-level Tiefling Blade-pact Warlock
    6 replies | 218 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 5th May, 2019, 12:25 PM
    It does! That's how I saw this post. "New posts" filters out all posts you've already read and you are assumed to have read a post you make. So you won't see your own posts unless someone replies.
    2 replies | 82 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 3rd May, 2019, 11:47 AM
    In 1E, Polymorph Other has a process for the target to lose personality. It was checked daily, so you'd want to tone that down or not depending on if the item's use is discretionary. Other possibilities include 1E's "Swords vs. Characters" check for intelligent weapons.
    51 replies | 1248 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 30th April, 2019, 10:14 PM
    Perhaps they get to play more than 3-4 times a year? That does tend to put a premium on actually playing usefully.
    46 replies | 3164 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 30th April, 2019, 01:33 PM
    Yeah. I was hoping they'd just be "people". Someone to talk to, negotiate with, attempt to ally, prevent a potentially disastrous misunderstanding from happening, etc. who have an odd viewpoint because most of the biological concerns don't interest them. Now they are effectively a boogeyman plot device.
    433 replies | 17438 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 30th April, 2019, 01:05 PM
    Original Star Trek "I, Mudd" had Rogue Servitors.
    433 replies | 17438 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 30th April, 2019, 01:00 PM
    I don't want to "help a table out": I want to play and advance my character. If I'm locked out of some awards at one table, I'll likely look for a table where that is not true. If I can't find one where I'm not treated as second class, I'll probably just wander off.
    46 replies | 3164 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 30th April, 2019, 02:07 AM
    Identical twins are clones. They don't have the same fingerprints. Many a murder mystery has relied on that.
    14 replies | 417 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 29th April, 2019, 11:43 PM
    It makes sense for their characters though. They've been hiding out in their home system for how long? They only came out when they thought they had a insurmountable advantage... and were stopped cold despite their intellectual superiority, preparedness, and thoroughly vetted plan. I was a bit disappointed when the Kaylons were revealed as Determined Exterminators, I was hoping for some...
    433 replies | 17438 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 29th April, 2019, 11:33 PM
    Well, this year probably not. Next year, it'll probably be burdensome to players like me. I don't play enough to get one character to tier 3 in a season -- often not even to tier 2. So come next year, I'll have to hope people near me keep running season 1-8. Otherwise, I'm going to be a perpetual newbie.
    46 replies | 3164 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 29th April, 2019, 06:50 PM
    I'm usually worried about GMs who don't have an understanding of basic science. There was one Traveler GM back in the mists of time who insisted radio was slower than light because nothing is faster than light! Semaphore flashing became our go-to communication simply because it was received faster than radio communication. Or the writers on Orphan Black who thought clones have the same...
    14 replies | 417 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 29th April, 2019, 06:34 PM
    That update reassures me somewhat. I have time to play 2-3 times per season. I skipped two of the last 3 because of the (for me) draconian season rules (get locked in Ravenloft! Adventure with only 25% of your hp and stay dead if you die!). The league would be completely unavailable if it required 1 character per season and I had to hunt around for an adventure worth playing on those few...
    46 replies | 3164 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 29th April, 2019, 02:45 PM
    I agree with the first couple of responses. I will only provide stimuli, never reaction. If I tell the player he feels dread, it is because something in the area has the effect of making him feel dread regardless of his base reaction (i.e. a spell, area effect, what-have-you). Even in game systems with more codified personalities (Hero, GURPS, Pendragon, FATE), I will simply call for the...
    59 replies | 1498 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 28th April, 2019, 02:23 AM
    Sabaton -- Cover of Metallica's For Whom the Bell Tolls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwDzLYyyE6A
    274 replies | 22954 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 21st April, 2019, 07:14 PM
    They used to have a cadre of enterprise architects so all the definitional work should be done. I guess they're gone?
    19 replies | 947 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 21st April, 2019, 07:10 PM
    One thing about the dénouement of the season finale confuses me. In addition to time suits and time crystals, Spock recommends erasing Discovery and its spore drive from the records in order to prevent a recurrence of Control. Why? The spore drive had no bearing on the discovery of time travel or Control so knowledge of its existence should do no harm. Did I miss some foundational...
    357 replies | 13767 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 21st April, 2019, 11:51 AM
    To keep a PbP game moving, I'd suggest a compromise: if a PC hasn't received a post in X days, a post will be made for it either by the DM or group consensus. That way the PC is ostensibly controlled by one person, but their absence doesn't confound the group. This mimics how I handle a player missing a session in tabletop play. You can try to mess with PC ownership, but people like to have...
    5 replies | 188 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 21st April, 2019, 12:33 AM
    Wasn't the whole point of the (+) and (-) thread designations to specifically stop posts like this? Nice personal attack on everyone participating. :-/
    357 replies | 13767 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Saturday, 20th April, 2019, 07:42 PM
    Some of your examples aren't situational so much as advancement narrowing: if you take elemental adept, you are predicting the character will be taking elemental invocations as frequently as possible. If for some reason the PC can't or the campaign develops in ways where such invocations are sub-optimal, then the character will be as well. As a player, the major problem with any permanent...
    11 replies | 493 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Saturday, 20th April, 2019, 12:07 PM
    Nah, the writers simply had an story that felt interesting and fun to them. It's just a pity that it wouldn't fit within the constraints of the universe, so they ignored the constraints that they felt interfered with the precious story and/or the cinematic awesomeness.
    357 replies | 13767 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Saturday, 20th April, 2019, 12:03 PM
    Probably. After watching the finale, I got my hopes up it was the series finale, but alas, it is only the season's. I expect next season (and probably any after that) will remain in the future so as to not constrain the writers.
    357 replies | 13767 view(s)
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Monday, 22nd April, 2019

  • 03:39 AM - Immortal Sun mentioned Nagol in post Playing With Collectively "Owned" Characters
    I agree with Nagol that characters who haven't gotten a post in X sessions becomes "public property". I think your initial idea might work if the players all bought into it to begin with, but I'd have some set guidelines for every character that the players have to agree to play by, that way you don't end up with characters with constantly flipping personalities.

Saturday, 6th April, 2019

  • 02:55 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post How to deal with death in RPG?
    The root is not generally about pacing.I didn't suggest any general root. It made a suggestion about a particular issue in a particular context. Nagol provided more information in response (fleshing out the meaning of "slowly") which corrected my misapprehension. The root is that GMs can, with effort, come up with some really cool stuff, but sometimes players don't engage with that stuff, or they choose to disengage once they have already bought in. <snip> You might say, "Well, I never use elements in my games that I can't prep rather quickly, so this is not an issue for me."I would, and did, say that - like S'mon - I don't have disappointing sessions. Some posters appeared to be sceptical of this. I'm not sure what you have in mind by "really cool stuff"; and I'm not sure what your threshold is for disappointment. Just having a look through my 4e prep folder on my computer, there are 60-odd files. There seem to be about 4 that (as best I recall) I never got to use: a fey forest encounter, a haunted fey swamp encounter, an aboleth encounter and an epic-tier shadowdark encounter. Each of these might be an hour or more of...

Friday, 5th April, 2019

  • 11:36 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post How to deal with death in RPG?
    To the extent that Nagol's Ars Magica example is meant to be a negative example, the issue would seem to be one of pacing. WIth the Champions example, again to the extent that it is meant to be a negative example, the issue would seem to be that the one player was able to make a choice that resolved the stakes for the other players. I think that can be a big issue, especially in systems that assume group play and so group win/loss.

Monday, 10th December, 2018

  • 04:51 AM - Lanefan mentioned Nagol in post Echohawk's Collector's Guides Broken?
    Lanefan, if you're still around, do me the favour of trying the matching link in my post #16 (it's the 2nd link)? Nagol - there are three links in post 16. The first and third ones work fine for me. The second, or middle one, gives me the same error I noted above.

Wednesday, 24th October, 2018

  • 02:04 PM - Blue mentioned Nagol in post Deleted Posts
  • 01:37 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    ...by improving in class ability. I think the answer to your "captain as henchman" question is trivially obvious, but at the moment I'll leave it as something for the interested reader to resolve. A more interesting question is whether a PC or henchman fighter enjoys the command abilities of a NPC captain if appointed to such a role. The rules don't tell us. I would suggest that they do, but that's an extrapolation from the rules, not an interpretation of them. It's a white room scenario pemerton. Knocking out the 20 goblins killing the townsfolk does nothing as the will just get back up and kill more. What is the party going to do? Leave them out in the middle of the forest to wake back up? It's not feasible to carry them to town. Carrying them to town will just result in the town killing them anyway, which will introduce the fighter to meting out death indirectly.I gave an actual play example upthread (from a different system, but no different in principle in this respect). Nagol gave an example. I can't remember the colours of the walls where I was playing, and don't know about Nagol's case, but white paint or not these are reports of actual play. As far as the goblins are concerned: (i) why is it not feasible to take them to town? (ii) where do the rules say that they will be killed in the town? (iii) handing someone over to someone else who then murders them typically is not a case of meting out death? (iv) why can't the PCs take an oath from the goblins to renounce their evil ways (thats what the PCs in my 4e game did on more than one occasion)? You seem to have an incredibly narrow conception of what is possible - presumably you think most of the above is house ruling, but I don't know where in the rulebooks you're taking your narrow conception from. In the game the PC has already hit and killed the opponent. Then, AFTER the player has found out that fact, the player can suddenly have the PC time travel back to before damage was rolled and decid...

Tuesday, 16th October, 2018

  • 11:28 PM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    To be perfectly honest, it didn’t really occur to me that this would be contentious.That surprises me! Although there are a wide variety of approaches expressed on ENworld (I'll point to eg Aldarc, TwoSix, Nagol in this thread), there is a default or dominant approach which is that RPGing = the GM establishes a fiction (which typically will take the form of some sort of "story") and the players' role is to work their way through that fiction. Hence any suggestion that players should exercise some control over establishing the fiction will be contentiouos.

Saturday, 13th October, 2018

  • 02:18 AM - Hussar mentioned Nagol in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    ...s the PC to be effectively "hands off" the element as well. So Background element of a factional membership/patronage/code of conduct could only remain on the Background so long as the PC is behaving in ways that are considered appropriate. A paladin of devotion can't go around burning down orphanages that were otherwise minding their own business; the player doesn't get a free pass from inappropriate behaviour. It's more of a "Don't ask; don't tell" situation. The DM won't bring situations into play specifically test adherence to the oath and the player will play generally compliant with the oath. A Warlock's patron might have him performing actions in downtime in the background, but the table won't be spending time on furthering the Great Old One's goals in the world. Sauntering my way through a lot of pages. This is a busy thread. But, it is good to see that someone here gets precisely what I'm talking about. If you don't like how I describe things, I suggest rereading Nagol's posts. He puts it perfectly well, gets the point immediately and can likely answer any questions better than I can.

Saturday, 22nd September, 2018

  • 04:13 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post Burning Questions: What's the Worst Thing a DM Can Do?
    ...ly 1 surprise die rolled for the party, using the best die (eg one ranger means the whole party is surprised only on a 1 in 6) - so 5e in this respect seems consistent with that strand of D&D tradition. You see, I'm still not sure that in Iserith's example that this would grant an active check. Or weather this counts as 'Keeping Watch' and therefore, in Iserith's mind, is still passive.I've asked him about this and so hopefully will soon learn! As for the example 'with context', take the example in isolation for a moment. There's a few contextual factors that might change the needle here but I they also change the purity of the example, I guess. Whatframing do you think underides the mechanics as set out?What I'm getting at here is my version of iserith's "telegraphing". When I GM, I don't do telegraphing in that way - rather, the telegraphing comes from what the PCs put at stake via the build and play of their PCs from the "story"/narrative point of view (see also my reply to Nagol not far upthread).
  • 04:09 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post Burning Questions: What's the Worst Thing a DM Can Do?
    Heh. I tried to say this in another thread and got dogpiled for it.To be fair, you got dogpiled for saying that it's a game creation engine in which the adventure/scenario is the game that is created. That's not what Nagol said - he pointed to a feature of adjudication of player-declared moves in RPGs.

Monday, 10th September, 2018

  • 09:14 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post X & O For More Fun
    If one person doesn't like horror films we don't invite that person on those occasions when we're going to see one. it's really much closer to the group having a horror movie night and someone else trying to change the genre.I don't have much to add to Nagol's reply. Turning up to play a RPG isn't, per se, turning up to be reminded of some unpleasant or traumatic personal incident that you're rather not (re)engage with as part of your leisure time. To use the spiders/bugs example that has been brought up a few times in the thread: is turning up to play a RPG ipso facto agreeing to be freaked out by bug narratives? I don't see how it is, and I don't see how it's any sort of "tyranny" or "entitlement" to ask the group to step back from that.

Friday, 8th June, 2018

  • 03:23 PM - Manbearcat mentioned Nagol in post Flipping the Table: Did Removing Miniatures Save D&D?
    Of course if it's the level of abstraction that is the issue with SC's for a few/some/many... a better explanation wouldn't have really helped. Some people just want finer granularity and tighter action association in their task resolution and mechanics. I definitely have some sympathy for this position (not because I hold it personally). Players like yourself and @Nagol have been very consistent on this point throughout many conversations over the years. If a gamer has strident Sim priorities and/or they have Sim priorities localized to their D&D play, then 4e's genre-logic and scene-based considerations/techniques (dramatic arc, escalation, narrative causality, fail forward) are going to be problematic, no doubt. And if you try to eschew all of these fundamental components to 4e scene-based play and smuggle in Sim priorities/approaches in their stead, the game is going to push back very hard. You're likely going to end up with boring, stale Skill Challenges where the situation doesn't change dynamically (or much at all), no dramatic arc arises, and it looks/feels like "an exercise in dice rolling." Our conversation many years ago (it was a good one) regarding "the gorge" is probably the benchmark for the dissonance you're ascribing to the game experience for you (and others like you). When your mental framework is predicated upon one very part...

Saturday, 14th April, 2018

  • 04:28 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    Pre-authored the secret door is there for PC's and NPC's to discover or stumble across even before it is "established" (At least in the way established has been used in this thread)...as an example that jumps readily to mind, in some games elves, whether PC's or NPC's would have a chance to detect said secret door just by passing near it, I'm not sure how an ability like this would work in a game where a secret door is never pre-authored it would either mean the ability is virtually useless and never discovers a secret door or it is rolled for every time they enter a room leading to a strange overabundance of secret doors in the world, often in illogical or strange places. Abilities like this definitely seem like a reason to favor one over the other. Nagol has already said some stuff in reply to this; I'll say a bit more. The PCs "stumbling across" a secret door really means that, at certain points, the GM tell the players that their PCs notice a secret door. These moments of telling can be regulated via a complex interaction of pre-authored and pre-mapped architecture, movement rules that require tracking the PC movement on the map, and rules for determining whether or not a PC notices a door when within 10'. That's how AD&D does it. But there are other ways to generate moments of telling. One of the PCs in my Burning Wheel game has the Dreamer ability: as a GM, I'm obliged from time to time to narrate portentous dreams that this PC has had. In effect, the player has paid a modest amount of PC building resources to impose this obligation on the GM. An elven ability to notice secret doors could be handled somewhat similarlly. As far as NPCs stumbling across a secret door - I'm not 100% sure what you have in mind, but that seems ...

Tuesday, 13th March, 2018

  • 11:08 PM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post Any Dungeon World players here?
    I would have pointed you to Cambelll and Manbearcat, but that already happened. I think Nagol also GMs Dungeon World. And I belive AbdulAlhazred has some experience. chaochou is an Apocalypse World player/GM and so might have something to contribute too. I've played it a little bit, and have a general grasp of its approach and methods, but am far from an expert.

Wednesday, 7th March, 2018

  • 03:04 PM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ... be useful if you can answer if you've been swayed in any way. If there are any decent answers to the question you posed in the OP. What is worldbuilding for? If you reply to me, I'd hope you would not cut this question out a third time. I think it'd genuinely be interesting to see your take on it after hundreds of pages of this thread. Certainly there must have been some take away for you?I answered this a long way upthread, I think in multiple posts. A range of answers have been given. Worldbuilding provides material for the GM to share with the players as triggered by their moves - this is generally described as "exploration". On the GM side, this can be a creative exercise. On the player side, it seems to be described mostly in terms of immersion. "Immersion" in this context seems necessarily to involve someone else telling fiction to the player, but that characterisation has been resisted to quite a degree. Worldbuilding provides the players with "levers" to do things - Nagol is the main poster to have talked about this. It hasn't been fully analysed in this thread, but there are multiple ways this could play out. One is in what I would call White Plume Mountain style - worldbuilding provides material, by way of fictional positioning, that the players can directly engage to proffer solutions to the puzzles they are faced with (I call it WPM because the paradigm, in my mind, is removing doors from their hinges so as to "surf" down the frictionless corridor over the pits with super-tetanus spikes). Another, which is less OSR-ish/WPM, and probably therefore more typical in contemporary RPGing, is that the players - by engaging with the "levers" - trigger the GM to narrate stuff in ways that go beyond pre-authoring. When this really starts to reflect player pro-activity, I think that we may see a transition to player-driven play without anyone in the game having to get self-conscious about it. Now that I think about it, AbdulAlhazred has, quite a way upthrea...

Tuesday, 27th February, 2018

  • 06:27 AM - AbdulAlhazred mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    1) principles play would be to curtail action negation through secret backstory. If it's never used, there's not point. No, instead, that was about the mere existence of secret backstory being enough to mean that the DM will not only occasionally veto a declaration, but that they will instead veto every declaration that doesn't fit their 'choose-your-own-adventure' novel backstory. This is clearly false. Well, that wasn't actually the question/commentary. The question was "if it is never going to use it to veto an action declaration, then why does it exist at all?" You COULD answer that, straight up, by providing some sort of reason. In fact some fairly plausible answers HAVE been presented. Nagol for instance suggested that a type of mystery story, and a type of exploration would both benefit from secret backstory or hidden world elements (which is a bit different but COULD be hidden backstory, they're pretty close anyway). I posed some questions, which we may yet examine :) 2) I don't think player-centered games provide all of the same depth of play experience. I think they provide a different play experience, one that can also be deep. This is a point that many have agreed upon, the chess vs checkers argument. The playstyles incorporate different approaches and goals and so can't provide the same experience because they aren't tuned to do so. You can mix and match a bit, but it's mostly importing some traits into a mostly DM or mostly player driven game. I think they can do different things. I actually tend to think that GM-centered play with hidden elements is MORE limited, but there are questions of aesthetics here and nobody can claim they own the final word on it,...

Monday, 26th February, 2018

  • 05:28 PM - pming mentioned Nagol in post Settling a player argument with Suggestion
    Hiya! So Charm Person lasts 1 hour per casting. Once it expires the person you charmed knows you charmed them and may not be all that receptive to you twisting their free will in this fashion. How does that days...weeks...months thing work in this case? I'll answer that for Nagol. He is/was playing 1e AD&D. In it, how long the spell lasted depended on the Intelligence of the creature charmed. If you were some sort of super-genius (19+ Intelligence), the duration was 1 Day. If you were dumb as a rock (3 Intelligence) it was 3 months. If you were of average Intelligence (10 Int, lets say), it was 3 weeks. Yeah...1e Charm Person is nothing to sneeze at. ^_^ Paul L. Ming

Saturday, 24th February, 2018

  • 10:17 PM - Lanefan mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...ans appropriate to their characters. Yet here we have a player who would rather use exploration and wise information gathering in order to go where the action isn't; in effect mitigating or sometimes entirely denying the DM the opportunity to frame these dramatic scenes as long as doing so allows character goals to be met, missions accomplished, etc. This to me is an important form of player agency that is entirely denied by 'go where the action is'. I rather badly waved at this idea a long way upthread; I'll try again here, using the example from pemerton 's game where the PCs were looking for a reliquary, and met some angels en route that showed them the way to get there. As written, the PCs conversed with the angels after which pemerton-as-GM went where the action is and framed the scene in the reliquary; and things proceeded from there. (note this might not be the best example to use but it's one I can remember the gist of without having to dig around) A player using Nagol 's approach loses out on gobs of agency here: - s/he doesn't get the opportunity to explore the approaches to and surroundings of the reliquary before arriving at the drama; which means - - s/he doesn't get a chance to explore the area around the reliquary to determine whether there's more than one possible approach or exit - - s/he doesn't get an opportunity to pre-scout the reliquary itself via stealth or scrying or whatever other means might be available in order to assess its occupants, threats, hazards, etc. - - because of this lack of knowledge s/he isn't able to mitigate potential risks or prepare for a potential encounter via pre-casting spells, downing potions, or whatever other means might be available - before all this, s/he also loses out on any opportunity to explore whatever might lie between the angel encounter site and the reliquary - by bypassing this the GM has arbitrarily decided there's nothing there of relevance rather than allowing the players to find ou...

Friday, 16th February, 2018

  • 02:23 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    On fiction and existence: this is a response to Ovinomancerr, Nagol, Lanefan, Michael Silverbane and chaochou. To begin: reading, listening, imagining etc are real processes that take place. Imagining involves causal processes in the brain. Listening also involves processes in the ears. Reading also involves processes in the eyes. I am taking the above to be uncontenious, so if you disagree you're going to have to let me know explicitly. There is more to these processes, too, which I will get to below. The process in the brain when these things - reading, listening, imagining - occur involve the linguistic capacity of the person to a high degree. I'm not really across the science of this, and am going to describe it in more colloquial terms: the person who is reading, listening or imagining forms and entertains ideas. Assuming that they know what they are reading, listening to or imagining is a fiction, however, then they don't form beliefs (other than prsently irrelevant beliefs, such as "I am now reading Hound of the Baskervilles"). ...

Wednesday, 31st January, 2018

  • 09:52 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...see the PF AP style as a descendant of this style. CoC is my favourite RPG to play in this style (with an evocative GM, and in modest doses). Then there is the "indie"/"no myth" style I like. There are variations in this style - eg I tend towards rather strongly scene-framed approaches, whereas eg Dungeon World is a bit structurally looser than that, with the GM decision-making a bit more on the micro-/granular rather than "big picture" side of things. But for the current thread these differences can be glossed over, I think. Then the "half-style": the one that is Gygaxian in some ways (pre-authored setting, but no fudging) but which has a scope and an approach that therefore makes player learning (through repeat attempts, use of divination resources, etc) hard; and makes the GM's role in choosing what to foreground about the setting much more important than the player's less mediated, more direct engagement with the dungeon map and the dungeon key. I think this is where you and Nagol probably fall (in terms of this thread - I'm not saying this is who you are as RPGers). I'll go this far in this post: I think this fourth style can tend to slip into a version of the 2nd ed style. Now just like there are variants in the "indie"-style, there are variants in that 2nd style. I'm running them together because the difference don't loom large for me (given my conception of player agency). Eg in a PF AP the players may be literally on a railroad (first encounter A, then encounter B, then C, etc). Whereas in some others that I'm putting into this category, the players can choose whether they go to A or B or C. From my point of view, though, the choice of A or B or C - if it is still a choice among things to be told by the GM - still makes the game a GM-driven one. The players just trigger which bit of his/her pre-written stuff the GM tells them. I think the fourth style can tend to slip into the "choose A or B or C" version of the second style. Without the clear stru...


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Sunday, 19th May, 2019

  • 06:13 AM - Psyzhran2357 quoted Nagol in post How do I go back to the mobile version of the website?
    Clear cookies probably? It worked, but it logged me out of everything else, so that sucks. If you are on a mobile device (smartphone or tablet), that may be a function of your device's browser. Don't see an option for that. I got to the desktop website by pressing the big button syaing "Deaktop Version", but the desktop website has no way to go back to the mobile website.

Friday, 17th May, 2019

  • 11:54 AM - Dioltach quoted Nagol in post Classic British television shows
    [QUOTE=Nagol;7606096] Sapphire and Steel -- a sort of Twilight Zone-ish show about two probably non-human agents who "repair" temporal/dimensional problems often to the detriment of those caught up in them I saw one series of that, when I was 5 or 6. It gave me nightmares for years.

Wednesday, 15th May, 2019

  • 08:34 PM - Umbran quoted Nagol in post The Orville Season Two - Thoughts?
    It just has to be a *very* big black hole to drop the tidal effect to manageable levels. Who knew a massive black hole was wandering around that section of the galaxy? No one! No one knew! Oh, their handling of the tidal forces can be explained - we know they can generate gravity (to keep people with feet on the deck, and probably more dynamically to keep crew members from becoming red smears on the bulkheads when they perform high acceleration maneuvers). They just use internal gravity generators to counter the effects.

Tuesday, 14th May, 2019

  • 02:30 PM - hamishspence quoted Nagol in post OOTS 1163 They Stayed Friends Though:
    It's not 3e. Rich had a post about that when 4e came out. People were asking if the strip would go through a period of "World change" like 3,0 to 3.5 had way back at the beginning of the strip. Rich said it was inspired by particular RPG editions, but he felt comfortable including things from whatever source was interesting. You mean this? http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?203003-4e-Oots I think, since then, the pattern has been toward the 3.5e ruleset - monsters since then have have DR/adamantine, or DR/silver, or DR/cold iron. Neither 4e nor 5e has those. I believe it's safe to say that the basic chassis for OOTS is 3.5e, even if other editions might receive the occasional nod.

Monday, 6th May, 2019

  • 07:19 PM - Yaarel quoted Nagol in post My activity doesnt appear in the ‘New Posts’ search list.
    It does! That's how I saw this post. "New posts" filters out all posts you've already read and you are assumed to have read a post you make. So you won't see your own posts unless someone replies. Nagol, thanks for your confirmation and the explanation. The piece I didnt take into account is, the "read" posts would be missing.

Friday, 3rd May, 2019

  • 02:50 PM - CapnZapp quoted Nagol in post "straight" rolls in D&D
    In 1E, Polymorph Other has a process for the target to lose personality. It was checked daily, so you'd want to tone that down or not depending on if the item's use is discretionary. Other possibilities include 1E's "Swords vs. Characters" check for intelligent weapons.I will have to check it out!

Tuesday, 30th April, 2019

  • 03:14 PM - Ryujin quoted Nagol in post The Orville Season Two - Thoughts?
    Yeah. I was hoping they'd just be "people". Someone to talk to, negotiate with, attempt to ally, prevent a potentially disastrous misunderstanding from happening, etc. who have an odd viewpoint because most of the biological concerns don't interest them. Now they are effectively a boogeyman plot device. That could be changed, if their fundamental premise could be shown to be flawed. Time for a patented James Tiberius Kirk logic loop!
  • 01:12 AM - MNblockhead quoted Nagol in post Running RPG games in historical or hard science-fiction settings
    I'm usually worried about GMs who don't have an understanding of basic science. There was one Traveler GM back in the mists of time who insisted radio was slower than light because nothing is faster than light! Semaphore flashing became our go-to communication simply because it was received faster than radio communication. Or the writers on Orphan Black who thought clones have the same fingerprints. Tech doesn't become much of an issue for the players so long as it is consistently portrayed and unusual situations are extrapolatable from known conditions. The only exception would be someone who thinks they are knowledgeable about a subject and is trying to McGuyver a custom solution to a problem. Well, you exhibit what I'm worried about. I fear that the examples you mention would not be considered "basic science" to many. I got your first reference, but had to google your second. I would guess that many people would mistake radio waves for sound waves. I knew that environmental factors...

Monday, 29th April, 2019

  • 07:25 PM - Dannyalcatraz quoted Nagol in post Running RPG games in historical or hard science-fiction settings
    I'm usually worried about GMs who don't have an understanding of basic science. There was one Traveler GM back in the mists of time who insisted radio was slower than light because nothing is faster than light! Semaphore flashing became our go-to communication simply because it was received faster than radio communication. Ohhhh, that hurts.

Sunday, 21st April, 2019

  • 11:39 PM - Umbran quoted Nagol in post Star Trek Discovery not getting any better I fear.
    Wasn't the whole point of the (+) and (-) thread designations... There is no (-) thread designation.
  • 10:39 PM - Hussar quoted Nagol in post Star Trek Discovery not getting any better I fear.
    One thing about the dénouement of the season finale confuses me. In addition to time suits and time crystals, Spock recommends erasing Discovery and its spore drive from the records in order to prevent a recurrence of Control. Why? The spore drive had no bearing on the discovery of time travel or Control so knowledge of its existence should do no harm. Did I miss some foundational relationship? Indeed, its been established that if the mycelium network dies, all life in the galaxy will perish. Even if the drive is found to be mostly useless, requiring as it does a genetically altered human to operate, wouldn't it be prudent to maintain study of the network to detect if another civilization (in this dimension or a nearby one) is poisoning the network? How does one go about hiding a foundational element of the universe anyway? There was something that caused it to be detected. That something isn't going to go away with anything less than Q-level power. You're presuming that the d...
  • 09:20 PM - MarkB quoted Nagol in post Star Trek Discovery not getting any better I fear.
    One thing about the dénouement of the season finale confuses me. In addition to time suits and time crystals, Spock recommends erasing Discovery and its spore drive from the records in order to prevent a recurrence of Control. Why? The spore drive had no bearing on the discovery of time travel or Control so knowledge of its existence should do no harm. Did I miss some foundational relationship? Discovery is a missing ship. The best way to stop people from pulling on that thread is for it to have never existed.
  • 12:37 AM - Morrus quoted Nagol in post Star Trek Discovery not getting any better I fear.
    Wasn't the whole point of the (+) and (-) thread designations to specifically stop posts like this? Nice personal attack on everyone participating. :-/ Fair. I just don’t get it. I just don’t watch things I don’t like. But you’re right; I’ll leave you to it.

Saturday, 20th April, 2019

  • 07:00 PM - Jester David quoted Nagol in post Star Trek Discovery not getting any better I fear.
    Probably. After watching the finale, I got my hopes up it was the series finale, but alas, it is only the season's. I expect next season (and probably any after that) will remain in the future so as to not constrain the writers. Probably for a bit. It's frustrating that they're doing a Star Trek series but seem wholly uninterested in actually making it a Star Trek series. It feels like advertising a television show as a World War 2 series and then redesigning all the Allied Forces and German uniforms, completely changing the design of tanks and planes, giving the Japanese U-boats. And then having the show focused around a squad that has built a stealth bomber. The weird thing is 900 years is a ridiculous length of time. 200 or 300 years would have been enough. That's like someone from 1119 coming to the modern world. Simple things should be magic. Especially with the way technology advances. Really, 250 years from now should look very different than Star Trek. 1000 years is almost b...

Wednesday, 17th April, 2019

  • 11:20 AM - Zardnaar quoted Nagol in post Anyone Else Play Stellaris?
    The micro, especially as a synth-ascended or machine empire is extraordinarily annoying. I can handle it until I get to about 100 colonies then I throw in the towel. That generally takes me the first 100 years or so. What is even more annoying, the only tool offered to reduce micro, population controls, burns 25 Influence per colony to activate. So I'd need to spend ~50 years of Influence gain to stop the micro -- assuming no new colonies, megastructure construction, diplomatic actions, war claims, or anything else that consumes Influence. The game performance, never great, took a nose dive under 2.2 and although the devs have improved it from its worst, it still sucks. I start seeing a slow down within the first hundred years. -- mostly connected to galactic population count. Ah yeah I tend to get collusus and blow up planets instead.
  • 03:41 AM - Zardnaar quoted Nagol in post Anyone Else Play Stellaris?
    I've shelved it for now. My preferred style is large and populous galaxies with "wide" growth. The current game supports this very poorly. Wide is easy. Or do you mean the micro?

Sunday, 14th April, 2019

  • 03:10 PM - Morrus quoted Nagol in post What's RPGNEWS.com?
    Is there a point to logging in? I could not see any "personalized" features like forums, interactive applets or the like. Not much. There are other features hidden away (a forum, comments, groups, etc) but they’re not linked from the menus.

Sunday, 7th April, 2019

  • 06:34 PM - Eis quoted Nagol in post D&D Products That Were Never Used By Anyone?
    Dragon Dice? oh man a friend of mine at work and I would come in early to our retail job and play dragon dice in the breakroom....it was always fun when the B Dalton had new sets and it NEVER failed to get people stopping and wondering wth we were doing good times

Saturday, 6th April, 2019

  • 02:23 AM - pemerton quoted Nagol in post How to deal with death in RPG?
    It's not the system assuming group play. The scenario framing provided group risk.That second bit is what I was trying to get at with "resolving the stakes for the other players". I think a system that allows that to happen - D&D certainly has this feature, and so does Rolemaster, Traveller, CoC, etc, because they don't have mechanical devices for separating consequences from the extrapolation of in-fiction causation - generates expectations for how the group should work at the table. Either, as S'mon has suggested, intra-group dissent/unravelling is accepted (and the obvious risk here is degeneration of the game) or else there are strong norms about respecting group decision-making. Upthread I said "My players are consscius of the need to manage group tensions, and are sensitive also to whether or not the game depends on 'party' play (see eg 4e D&D, which is, vs Burning Wheel or Cortex+ Heroic Fantasy, which is not)." That's pointing to the same general issue.

Friday, 5th April, 2019

  • 04:18 PM - pemerton quoted Nagol in post How to deal with death in RPG?
    Neither were about pacing. The Ars Magica campaign had about a 5 minute conversationThis is a case of me misunderstanding your desscription of "The PC was slowly bringing the conversation around to the issue." The CHAMPIONS campaign the players were aware of the danger to several PC loved ones. The group had decided a direct frontal assault was too risky and spent maybe three minutes working out a plan when on player decided that's not an approach his character would take and he unilaterally did the whole out in the open call out.This seems to reinforce my suggestion that "the issue would seem to be that the one player was able to make a choice that resolved the stakes for the other players." And it seems to reinforce my suggestion that this can be a big issue, especially in systems that assume group play and so group win/loss.


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