View Profile: WaterRabbit - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Thursday, 14th March, 2019, 11:12 PM
    Still don't see the requirement that the target has to use any specific action. It could use Dash or Disengage, but there isn't a requirement for it. A rogue isn't required to use its bonus action to Dash either. One could make an argument that if they could mount an creature and move further that might be an option, but the mount rules are kind of wonky with regards to this. It seems...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Thursday, 14th March, 2019, 05:26 PM
    But a picture/map is worth a thousand words. Both allow you to focus on meaningful description instead of the mundane size of room and number of exits.
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Thursday, 14th March, 2019, 05:23 PM
    This does not require the target to use the Dash action. It just means that if the target has multiple modes of locomotion, it chooses the fastest. The command doesn't require the target to even spend an action. A target with a ranged attack could move away from the caster and then shoot them for example. I think people are reading too much into this. If the intent were the target would...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Monday, 4th March, 2019, 04:45 PM
    Um, no. Both get class abilities as they level. That is all you have shown. Weapons, armor, spells, potions are acquired through play (but a fighter does get stuff at 1st level just like a wizard). So you are just purposely missing the point here. A full work week of time to learn a few spells means that everyone else is able to engage in downtime activities while the wizard is learning...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Friday, 1st March, 2019, 05:24 PM
    I noticed that you conveniently left off the cogent part, The Book's Appearance Your spellbook is a unique compilation of spells, with its own decorative flourishes and margin notes. It might be a plain, functional leather volume that you received as a gift from your master, a finely bound gilt-edged tome you found in an ancient library, or even a loose collection of notes scrounged together...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Friday, 1st March, 2019, 04:49 PM
    I challenge you to find something in RAW/RAI that defines explicitly what a spellbook is. Also, as I pointed out, it would not be pointless for a number of reason listed in the section that defines the process of inscribing a spell into a book.
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Thursday, 28th February, 2019, 04:40 PM
    5ekyu I think your argument falls apart when you consider that a wizard isn't specifically required to scribe new spells in their spellbook. There is nothing preventing a wizard collecting spellbooks and just preparing them from any of those. Now it may be inconvenient to carry around 50 spellbooks but the spellbook isn't that tightly defined. The rules that define the spellbook are fairly...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Wednesday, 27th February, 2019, 04:10 PM
    IIRC, in the Undermountain book just released they had prices for spellbooks. They were priced at the highest level spell available in the book and thus were very cheap. Something like 350gp for a spellbook that could have 50 spells, but the highest was 3rd level. The price seemed a bit low to me.
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Wednesday, 27th February, 2019, 12:03 AM
    The simplest solution to me is just to apply the Instant Death due to massive damage rule. If the suicidal frog gets hit for more than 1 point of damage, the character is killed. The spell is also broken so you now have a dead humanoid instead of a dead frog. This is in the context of "The target assumes the hit points of its new form". Instead, another player could try to just knock the...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Tuesday, 26th February, 2019, 07:22 PM
    There is no difference between using a d20 vs using a d100. The both are flat distributions. So instead of counting by 5 you count by 1. The other problem with flat distribution is when looking at contested actions. So a high strength vs medium strength arm wrestle for example. In a flat distribution, the lower strength person can win quite a bit more frequently because any number is...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Tuesday, 26th February, 2019, 06:31 PM
    In the category of dice that will never be used to model a game. 2d10 creates a nice bell curve without the improbability that 4d6 incurs (1 in 10 * 1 in 10 = 1 in 100) vs (1 in 6 * 1 in 6 * 1 in 6 * 1 in 6 = 1 in 1,296). Not only is the math a pain, but it swings the ends too far out. You might as well not bother with the dice at all and just use fixed numbers. The idea behind having a...
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  • WaterRabbit's Avatar
    Monday, 25th February, 2019, 10:14 PM
    2d10 would be much better at modeling D&D combat than 3d6 -- that's GURPS territory. :) Also, I doubt that grognards would have a problem with dice that create a bell probability over a flat probability. Just make sure you pronounce grognard correctly if you are going to throw it around.
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About WaterRabbit

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Thursday, 22nd November, 2018

  • 04:54 AM - Laurefindel mentioned WaterRabbit in post Scary situations that aren't
    Personally, I like treating hp as a resource that a character must spend to stay alive. If you receive damage, you fall unconscious and are dying. To avoid that, you must spend hp - in equal amount as damage dealt - to stay up and fighting. I leave the task of describing damage to the player; whatever they imagine that makes their character still standing (assuming the still have at least 1 hp) is fine with me. You avoided the blow in extremis? Cool Your armor took the blunt of the blow? Cool The arrow pinned your hat to the tree? Cool You took that sword in the guts and kept going? Cool You're just stupidly lucky? Cool Plot armor is just that - plot armor - ( WaterRabbit is right; plot armor is improperly used here. Still, I stand by the essence of my post) but regardless of the narrative you come up with, if you took 15 damage, you're 15 points closer to death. And perhaps poisoned. Or grappled. Or shocked out of a reaction. Until that plot armor wears too thin. The rules are easy to follow; make the story you like for your character that goes with them.

Friday, 9th November, 2018

  • 07:55 AM - ClaytonCross mentioned WaterRabbit in post Is Ranged really better than Melee?
    Oh lord is this thread really devolving into a Battle of Pedants about military history? I guess most of them do. Your not wrong, so I am bowing out and returning to the topic. I had more to say but your point is fair and it was really becoming a different conversation and I was going to recommend that WaterRabbit start another thread and we could pick up there but then I realized it is moved too far from D&D to even post here. So Elfcrusher, I am sorry for the side track and thanks for the tactful call out.

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Wednesday, 20th March, 2019

  • 05:02 AM - MNblockhead quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    The only module I have purchased for Roll20 was Curse of Strahd. To be honest I didn't find it all that helpful except it did include some maps that were not in the book -- 2d floor plans of the castle. Did it save some prep time? A bit. However, I still had to import/draw lots of maps and create monsters to run the adventure. So, I am skeptical of modules that cost more than about $10 for VTTs. Huh. I'd hope that they would have all the wall tracing done so that dynamic lighting and auto-reveal, etc., would be ready to use. I would also hope that all the encounter stats and tokens would be included.

Monday, 18th March, 2019

  • 10:31 PM - Rob Twohy quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    You are expanding the process beyond the initial discussion is why you are going there. The initial discussion was about adding modules to FG. Most of what you are describing the work has already been done. Also, try to be a bit less condescending. You have no idea my background and I assure you that putting together a title for production doesn't even rise to my list of difficult projects. I am also quite familiar with the "Scotty" syndrome which is on full display here. Hey whoa whoa whoa... As I understand it, condesension implies "an attitude of patronizing superiority" and I never intedned that at all. I was simply stating that expressing a position of "not boding well for Fantasy Grounds" simply because there is a complicated process behind making a good product for the public is not very valid. It's only my opinion. I never meant to be anything other than observant.
  • 06:41 PM - Rob Twohy quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    Why are you building classes, feats, races, and spells? They should already be built as the Saltmarsh series doesn't have anything unique in it. I think you are way exaggerating how much effort it takes. Entering the text is just a copy and paste from a scan (that's assuming you didn't do anything more than that). I listed a full example of what might be needed, and those are all needed for an example of a book that probably every person using a VTT to play 5E might want, the Player's Handbook. I barely scratched the surface of the many backend processies that are required to make an electronic version of a WotC book that a company would be proud to sell to any user for HALF of what Roll20 does. There's just way more to it than what I laid out in a simple example that a person could read in a minute or two. Until you actually develop titles (which I have), you really wouldn't apprecaite the process. But to say what you did that just because making a licensed work conversion is a lot of work,...
  • 06:12 PM - bedir than quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    Why are you building classes, feats, races, and spells? They should already be built as the Saltmarsh series doesn't have anything unique in it. I think you are way exaggerating how much effort it takes. Entering the text is just a copy and paste from a scan (that's assuming you didn't do anything more than that). The assumption that the Ghosts of Saltmarsh book only has the three Saltmarsh series modules is your issue. It clearly has more than just that. It has rules about ship play, almost certainly has feats and certain subclasses. We know it has player facing info because it is a 5e book
  • 04:38 PM - Rob Twohy quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    400-600 hours seems excessive to me. I converted the original U1 into Roll20, including drawing my own outdoor contour map (which isn't included in the adventure). By converted I mean created from scratch. I drew all of the maps including added the dynamic lighting elements. That also includes replacing all of the monsters with 5e versions (I substituted Hobgoblins because they fit an ongoing arc IMC). That means creating tokens, NPC character sheets, etc. I also created loot handouts to give to the party. Finally, I had to integrate it into my ongoing campaign story. Overall it took about 8 hours. If it take 400 hours to convert instead of hand drawing everything than either someone is really inefficient or FG is way too work intensive. This isn't a ringing endorsement for FG to me. Well let's see... Considering the steps it takes to make a book from a WotC property into a Fantasy Grounds module... 1. Resize all images to fit nicely on the screen for users. Maps and artwo...

Thursday, 14th March, 2019

  • 09:00 PM - LordEntrails quoted WaterRabbit in post Describing is Seeing (and more)
    This is one area that I think digital excels at. When I use my VTT online or in person, rooms get three descriptions. First the players see the map. Second they get the "boxed text" in the chat window they can read. Third they get my audio description. This means I almost never have to describe size. It means that players get major information in 3 ways. So that people (like me) who often have a hard time building a mental image from a verbal description can get the details in a way that works for them. You can do similar with battlemaps, terrains and miniatures, but digital is much easier/faster/quicker once you are there (but less tactile and no reading material for the players). For instance, I tend to focus on priorities like Obvious dangers to you now (creatures, moving effects, etc.) Obvious dangers other than those ( pits, broken floors, crumbling roof.) Exits and entrances Major furnishings Anything "active" This is a good list. Though when going digital I usually ignor...
  • 06:58 PM - Lidgar quoted WaterRabbit in post Command: Flee
    This does not require the target to use the Dash action. It just means that if the target has multiple modes of locomotion, it chooses the fastest. The command doesn't require the target to even spend an action. A target with a ranged attack could move away from the caster and then shoot them for example. I think people are reading too much into this. If the intent were the target would use the Dash action, it would have been specified. Compare this to the Halt command which does explicitly states the target takes no actions. The Approach, Drop, and Grovel commands both state the target does something and then ends it turn. Flee. The target spends its turn moving away from you by the fastest available means. Bolded for emphasis. I would interpret that as the target spending it's entire turn "fleeing". Like the other options you mention (grovel, approach, etc.), it seems to be pretty clear that if you fail your save, you spend your entire turn involuntarily executing the caster's comman...
  • 06:29 PM - UngeheuerLich quoted WaterRabbit in post Command: Flee
    This does not require the target to use the Dash action. It just means that if the target has multiple modes of locomotion, it chooses the fastest. The command doesn't require the target to even spend an action. A target with a ranged attack could move away from the caster and then shoot them for example. I think people are reading too much into this. If the intent were the target would use the Dash action, it would have been specified. Compare this to the Halt command which does explicitly states the target takes no actions. The Approach, Drop, and Grovel commands both state the target does something and then ends it turn. I don't think shooting fulfills the requirement of flee. But I do aknowledge that spending an action to dash or even cast teleport is a bit too much. I would look at the turn undead rule.
  • 06:22 PM - 5ekyu quoted WaterRabbit in post Describing is Seeing (and more)
    But a picture/map is worth a thousand words. Both allow you to focus on meaningful description instead of the mundane size of room and number of exits.I agree completely and often use maps myself... But... In this case using ToM this would have been a quick done and past thing, no map ever needed, if only a little more complete description was done at the outset.

Tuesday, 12th March, 2019

  • 04:28 PM - Rhineglade quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    No that is incorrect. The original U1 series wasn't set in any particular game setting. It was later placed in Greyhawk. Text from the actual print: "On the WORLD OFGREYHAWK™ map, Saltmarsh is placed in the southernmost part of Keoland, at the western edge of hex U4/123."

Saturday, 2nd March, 2019

  • 10:24 PM - 77IM quoted WaterRabbit in post Value of a spell book (gp wise)
    In Dragon Heist, they assign the retail value for spells at: 1st - 25 gp 2nd - 75 gp 3rd - 150 gp 4th - 300 gp 5th - 750 gp Let's extend this progression. This involves some guesswork: 1st - 25 gp 2nd - 75 gp 3rd - 150 gp 4th - 300 gp 5th - 750 gp 6th - 1,500 gp 7th - 3,000 gp 8th - 7,500 gp 9th - 15,000 gp This is a 10x cost increase per 3 spell levels, which is roughly the same rate as for magic items/spell scrolls. (Each rarity band is a 10x increase, and spell scrolls increase rarity band roughly every three spell levels. Both rates have a discontinuity around Uncommon band.) 1st level spell get a slight discount, presumably because 1st level wizards are somewhat more common than the progression would indicate. It's all approximate anyway. These costs are roughly 60% of the costs of an equivalent scroll. (According to the "Magic Item Rarity" table in the DMG, with consumable items at half price.)

Friday, 1st March, 2019

  • 08:20 PM - 5ekyu quoted WaterRabbit in post Value of a spell book (gp wise)
    I noticed that you conveniently left off the cogent part, The Book's Appearance Your spellbook is a unique compilation of spells, with its own decorative flourishes and margin notes. It might be a plain, functional leather volume that you received as a gift from your master, a finely bound gilt-edged tome you found in an ancient library, or even a loose collection of notes scrounged together after you lost your previous spellbook in a mishap. There is no requirement that the spellbook is a single tome. There also isn't any requirement that copying a spell into the spellbook is required to learn. Now that may be your houserule, but it isn't a general rule for the game. All of the language of the game is "can" and "may" not must. All that is required to learn a spell is time. In 5e spellbooks are not magical in and of themselves like prior editions. There aren't any requirements for special magical inks and whatnot. There are only two reasons to copy a spell. The first is that i...
  • 08:06 PM - 5ekyu quoted WaterRabbit in post Value of a spell book (gp wise)
    I noticed that you conveniently left off the cogent part, The Book's Appearance Your spellbook is a unique compilation of spells, with its own decorative flourishes and margin notes. It might be a plain, functional leather volume that you received as a gift from your master, a finely bound gilt-edged tome you found in an ancient library, or even a loose collection of notes scrounged together after you lost your previous spellbook in a mishap. There is no requirement that the spellbook is a single tome. There also isn't any requirement that copying a spell into the spellbook is required to learn. Now that may be your houserule, but it isn't a general rule for the game. All of the language of the game is "can" and "may" not must. All that is required to learn a spell is time. In 5e spellbooks are not magical in and of themselves like prior editions. There aren't any requirements for special magical inks and whatnot. There are only two reasons to copy a spell. The first is that i...

Thursday, 28th February, 2019

  • 05:31 PM - Li Shenron quoted WaterRabbit in post Value of a spell book (gp wise)
    5ekyu I think your argument falls apart when you consider that a wizard isn't specifically required to scribe new spells in their spellbook. There is nothing preventing a wizard collecting spellbooks and just preparing them from any of those. Now it may be inconvenient to carry around 50 spellbooks but the spellbook isn't that tightly defined. That's arguably not RAW and certainly not RAI, otherwise the scribing rules would be pointless.
  • 04:58 PM - 5ekyu quoted WaterRabbit in post Value of a spell book (gp wise)
    5ekyu I think your argument falls apart when you consider that a wizard isn't specifically required to scribe new spells in their spellbook. There is nothing preventing a wizard collecting spellbooks and just preparing them from any of those. Now it may be inconvenient to carry around 50 spellbooks but the spellbook isn't that tightly defined. The rules that define the spellbook are fairly open. They describe the process of scribing new spells into your spellbook if you have the time to decipher and copy. Well if you can decipher, then one doesn't really need to copy. The form of the spellbook is also fairly open and could even just be a library of books if the wizard liked. That may not be the most portable solution. So the cost of acquiring a spell is irrespective of the cost of scribing it in general. A wizard can only learn two spells per level, so assuming they always take the two of the highest level they can cast that gives: 10 x 1st level and 4 x level 2-9 and an additional 4 fro...

Tuesday, 26th February, 2019

  • 06:48 PM - TaranTheWanderer quoted WaterRabbit in post A true D20 game system? Has anyone ever thought about trying this?
    In the category of dice that will never be used to model a game. 2d10 creates a nice bell curve without the improbability that 4d6 incurs (1 in 10 * 1 in 10 = 1 in 100) vs (1 in 6 * 1 in 6 * 1 in 6 * 1 in 6 = 1 in 1,296). Not only is the math a pain, but it swings the ends too far out. You might as well not bother with the dice at all and just use fixed numbers. The idea behind having a curve vs linear is that a +1 modifier is much more significant. A +1 sword is actually useful. However, I prefer exploding dice systems vs a target # like ShadowRun, Earthdawn (if you like using all of your polyhedral dice) and to some extent Storyteller. In those systems success feel more significant. In Shadowrun in particular, the number of success influences the amount of damage done as well, so it's a double win. As I mentioned above percentile dice work well. Dangerous Journeys used a skill system that ranged from 1-100. You had to roll under your skill. Difficulty was represented like s...
  • 06:47 PM - dnd4vr quoted WaterRabbit in post A true D20 game system? Has anyone ever thought about trying this?
    In the category of dice that will never be used to model a game. 2d10 creates a nice bell curve without the improbability that 4d6 incurs (1 in 10 * 1 in 10 = 1 in 100) vs (1 in 6 * 1 in 6 * 1 in 6 * 1 in 6 = 1 in 1,296). Not only is the math a pain, but it swings the ends too far out. You might as well not bother with the dice at all and just use fixed numbers. The idea behind having a curve vs linear is that a +1 modifier is much more significant. A +1 sword is actually useful. However, I prefer exploding dice systems vs a target # like ShadowRun, Earthdawn (if you like using all of your polyhedral dice) and to some extent Storyteller. In those systems success feel more significant. In Shadowrun in particular, the number of success influences the amount of damage done as well, so it's a double win. True, the 4d6-4 method was derived because it more approximates a normal curve, not just a bell curve. I never ended up using it since it was for a game I was developing, but I always...

Tuesday, 5th February, 2019

  • 04:33 PM - Retreater quoted WaterRabbit in post 5e - Just Missing the Mark
    Also, the other odd thing about this. Why are you having to look up rules like this "at the table" don't you do any pre-game prep? You should have a good idea beforehand if jumping, underwater combat, riding, etc. are going to come up in the session. Granted players can do wacky things, but I generally know have some idea beforehand that I should prepare for. And has been pointed out, this idea of a poor index is a horse that has been beaten to death many many times over the last four years. If the index bothers you that much, follow the suggestions and download a more complete one. Sometimes (in the case of Tomb of Annihilation) it is a random encounter. Sometimes the party gets farther in the adventure than I was planned for (in the case of Yawning Portal). And sometimes the tactics caught me off guard (as in the homebrew). One of the observations from many of my groups is that I over prep, but you can't be ready for every situation. I guess the answer is to download and replace the ...

Friday, 1st February, 2019


Tuesday, 22nd January, 2019

  • 11:14 PM - doctorbadwolf quoted WaterRabbit in post The help action is not broken, but Working together is
    and So it is a bad rule because you created a house rule that would not apply? Why are you even using skill checks for magic item creation? If you are going to use skill checks it seems like it would take various skill checks mostly to determine progress, not success or failure. The two are unrelated, first of all. It's an example, not the point. It's an example from a recent game. Also, the rules in the DMG for working together on a crafting project are essentially the same as working together on an ability check. The same restrictions and logic apply, regardless of any houserule. The point is, we were doing something that required that I make ability checks, and several people worked together (shortening time and cost, as well as providing advantage on one check each) even though none of them but my character could have enchanted a magic sword on their own. Each had a competency that was relevant to the task, and applied that in a way that made sense within the narrative. Sec...


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