View Profile: WaterRabbit - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
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    Today, 04:19 PM
    If you have played Witcher 3, you would see an excellent example of this in fantasy fiction. Not only book burning, but the burning of witches at the stake. It would be easy to create a whole pogrom against a particular group. Even in a setting such as the Forgotten Realms, which is a Renaissance setting, it would not be unheard of for inquisitions to take place. What that has to be...
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    Yesterday, 06:34 PM
    I think too much of this discussion devolved into how two spells in particular work. I think the more general thrust would be, given the spells and items in the game, what would a game world realistically look like? Does a setting like Forgotten Realms really work from a magical perspective? For example, take a wall-city or castle. Neither are effective at stopping aerial or teleporting...
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    Monday, 29th April, 2019, 04:38 PM
    I think thread necromancy is a function of how this forum is laid out.
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    Wednesday, 24th April, 2019, 02:49 PM
    In case you were confused, the title of the thread is "Fixing the Terrible Weapon Master Feat". So, the question you pose isn't any different than the reasons someone would take the original feat. Multiclassing isn't allowed; playing to level 20 and don't want to give up a capstone ability through multiclassing just to get a weapon; gain access to weapon proficiencies in the base table. So,...
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    Wednesday, 24th April, 2019, 02:41 PM
    Ok, good to know you think that. However, your comment cuts into the overall credibility of any of your arguments here since it has no explanation as to why you think that.
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Monday, 29th April, 2019


Friday, 12th April, 2019

  • 12:23 AM - Hussar mentioned WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    ...y about the same amount as, say, putting a parchment background behind text, or using flavorful typefaces. Maybe RPGs should all be published exclusively in black Times on white backgrounds so that no extra neurons will be required to utilize them. I like the sideways map. Reminds me of the Erebor map in the Hobbit. If every now and then I say, "Oh, right, that's East, not North" that ranks 3,478th on my list of problems. And a Lich ain't one. Heh, Times is an ugly font that would turn me off of any map. :D And, yeah, you want to use those fancy squirrely fonts? Make it hard to read? Next map please. The point of a map is to be used. Particularly a map for D&D. It's not an art piece only. It has to be functional. Which means anything that makes it harder to use is bad. Thus, randomly choosing a compass rose to point to the left, using hard to read fonts, using odd parchment colors that bleed into the map itself, are all examples of poor map design. WaterRabbit, I'm frankly rather surprised that you are arguing so vehemently on this to be honest. Yes, there is a top of a map. Because maps often have writing on them and the writing is oriented to the top of the paper. Which, virtually always, is north (or close enough to north anyway). Which has been done for virtually all maps for the past 500 years. Heck a quick Google search of 16th century maps proves that. Maps are a pet thing for me. I love maps. I spend far too much time perusing old map collections because it's a bit of a hobby. You know what I don't see in all those collections? Maps with north to the left of the page. :D In all the years I was in the army, never saw that either. We used grid coordinate maps, down to a 100 meter square, and yet, the maps were always oriented north to the top (or close enough). When using a paper map when orienteering, you orient your map so that the map follows the compass, not the direction of travel, which means the top of your map...

Thursday, 22nd November, 2018

  • 04:54 AM - Laurefindel mentioned WaterRabbit in post Scary situations that aren't
    Personally, I like treating hp as a resource that a character must spend to stay alive. If you receive damage, you fall unconscious and are dying. To avoid that, you must spend hp - in equal amount as damage dealt - to stay up and fighting. I leave the task of describing damage to the player; whatever they imagine that makes their character still standing (assuming the still have at least 1 hp) is fine with me. You avoided the blow in extremis? Cool Your armor took the blunt of the blow? Cool The arrow pinned your hat to the tree? Cool You took that sword in the guts and kept going? Cool You're just stupidly lucky? Cool Plot armor is just that - plot armor - ( WaterRabbit is right; plot armor is improperly used here. Still, I stand by the essence of my post) but regardless of the narrative you come up with, if you took 15 damage, you're 15 points closer to death. And perhaps poisoned. Or grappled. Or shocked out of a reaction. Until that plot armor wears too thin. The rules are easy to follow; make the story you like for your character that goes with them.

Friday, 9th November, 2018

  • 07:55 AM - ClaytonCross mentioned WaterRabbit in post Is Ranged really better than Melee?
    Oh lord is this thread really devolving into a Battle of Pedants about military history? I guess most of them do. Your not wrong, so I am bowing out and returning to the topic. I had more to say but your point is fair and it was really becoming a different conversation and I was going to recommend that WaterRabbit start another thread and we could pick up there but then I realized it is moved too far from D&D to even post here. So Elfcrusher, I am sorry for the side track and thanks for the tactful call out.

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Monday, 29th April, 2019

  • 11:00 PM - Hussar quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    Curse of Strahd has a significant number of maps where North is not oriented to the top of the map: Abby of St. Markovia, Castle Ravenloft all but one, Vistani Camp, Tsolenka Pass, Death House Maps. So about 1/4 to a 1/3. Especially for the Abby, it just would not fit on a single page without losing a lot of detail were it oriented to the top of the page. Your majority distinction is a bit silly though as a product with a single map while the majority would not be that determinative. ROTFLMAO. So, 3/4 of the maps are oriented north to the top, but, that's apparently not a majority? This has been, without a doubt, the most bizarre argument I've ever had on En World. You folks are arguing that despite the fact that most (as in nearly all) maps you will see for the past few hundred years, are oriented north to the top, there is no actual standard for doing this and it's not unusual to do maps that aren't north to the top. Wow. Hey, whatever floats your boat. This all starte...

Thursday, 25th April, 2019

  • 10:31 PM - Chaosmancer quoted WaterRabbit in post Fixing the terrible Weapon Master feat
    In case you were confused, the title of the thread is "Fixing the Terrible Weapon Master Feat". So, the question you pose isn't any different than the reasons someone would take the original feat. Multiclassing isn't allowed; playing to level 20 and don't want to give up a capstone ability through multiclassing just to get a weapon; gain access to weapon proficiencies [Did you want a "not" here"? in the base table. So, what I am assuming you meant was that you don't think the proposed change is sufficient to make the feat viable. Fair enough. But maybe offer your own tweak or build on what others have posted. Yeah, I don't think it is sufficient enough for most tables. From everything I have seen and heard 1) Multi-class is common, 2) Most capstones are not desirable 3) Most tables do not use weapons not on the base tables, and if they do they often either provide proficiency or the DM does not want players proficient in those weapons. I did offer the homebrew I use (taken from T...

Wednesday, 24th April, 2019

  • 03:08 PM - Bawylie quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    Ok, good to know you think that. However, your comment cuts into the overall credibility of any of your arguments here since it has no explanation as to why you think that. Any of them, huh? Oh well.
  • 02:58 AM - Chaosmancer quoted WaterRabbit in post Fixing the terrible Weapon Master feat
    However, this seems like a good fix on saw on gdnd: Weapon Master Increase your Strength or Dexterity by 1, to a maximum of 20. You gain proficiency with any four weapons of your choice; OR you gain a fighting style of your choice from the Fighter's list. Assuming multi-class is legal, why take this over a level of fighter? The only thing I can think of is having an odd stat, otherwise a single level of fighter is better every time and that is the thing I keep running up against with this feat.
  • 12:39 AM - Oofta quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    That is what I dislike the most here. Why are you assuming that cheating is involved anywhere? Why bring it up? That is not at all the reason why understanding how the player is trying to accomplish a task works. Unless you are playing a board game version of the game, it is unlikely that the players have access to all of the information involving the the task they are trying to accomplish. How a player tries to climb the metaphorical wall (because we really aren't talking about just a wall, but any task) makes a difference in outcomes and the information they get. In your game, they player declares they climb the wall. However, in mine they might be using pitons to create ropes because other party members have terrible athletics. By using pitons, they actually break pieces of rock off and find an ancient bas relief underneath. But if they just climbed straight up with their hands they wouldn't. The "how" matters as much as the "what" -- sometimes more. But this is the differe...
  • 12:13 AM - Bawylie quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    That is what I dislike the most here. Why are you assuming that cheating is involved anywhere? Why bring it up? That is not at all the reason why understanding how the player is trying to accomplish a task works. Unless you are playing a board game version of the game, it is unlikely that the players have access to all of the information involving the the task they are trying to accomplish. How a player tries to climb the metaphorical wall (because we really aren't talking about just a wall, but any task) makes a difference in outcomes and the information they get. In your game, they player declares they climb the wall. However, in mine they might be using pitons to create ropes because other party members have terrible athletics. By using pitons, they actually break pieces of rock off and find an ancient bas relief underneath. But if they just climbed straight up with their hands they wouldn't. The "how" matters as much as the "what" -- sometimes more. But this is the differe...

Tuesday, 23rd April, 2019

  • 11:43 PM - 5ekyu quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    That is what I dislike the most here. Why are you assuming that cheating is involved anywhere? Why bring it up? That is not at all the reason why understanding how the player is trying to accomplish a task works. Unless you are playing a board game version of the game, it is unlikely that the players have access to all of the information involving the the task they are trying to accomplish. How a player tries to climb the metaphorical wall (because we really aren't talking about just a wall, but any task) makes a difference in outcomes and the information they get. In your game, they player declares they climb the wall. However, in mine they might be using pitons to create ropes because other party members have terrible athletics. By using pitons, they actually break pieces of rock off and find an ancient bas relief underneath. But if they just climbed straight up with their hands they wouldn't. The "how" matters as much as the "what" -- sometimes more. But this is the difference be...
  • 09:26 PM - Chaosmancer quoted WaterRabbit in post Fixing the terrible Weapon Master feat
    I don't know what point you are arguing here. Obviously if a weapon is a common staple then this feat would not apply outside of its normal use. No one is arguing that this is a great feat. Think "Expedition to the Barrier Peaks" as an example of where this feat could be used to expand a player's proficiencies. Otherwise, it is a niche feat that usually multiclassing would be a better choice -- unless of course multiclassing isn't being used. I was being a little snippy to be honest. The phrase "real utility" made me think that you wanted to imply this was the true use of the feat that we hadn't considered. That it was a great feat if only we had thought about it in the right way. Apologies for assuming, but I've been embroiled in some heated discussions recently and it's made me a little more short than I should be with people. Well that is fantastic. However, siege weapons generally have an operator that is proficient (i.e., allows the use of a proficiency bonus). If ...
  • 04:32 PM - bedir than quoted WaterRabbit in post Fixing the terrible Weapon Master feat
    Well that is fantastic. However, siege weapons generally have an operator that is proficient (i.e., allows the use of a proficiency bonus). If your campaign takes place primarily on a ship that has canon's that are used in ship-to-ship actions, then it is good to have proficiency in the weapon. In most campaigns, players would never bother with learning siege weapons. However, in most campaigns the riding rules also come up rarely. I am quite sure that Mounted Combatant isn't chosen that often either. But in the right campaign, it probably is a great feat. This is probably the case for a good number of the feats that aren't that useful compared to just a few. So yes Weapon Master is a poor feat to pick unless there is a campaign specific reason to make it worthwhile. Great Weapon Master on the other hand is always useful based on the character build except for a few campaign settings where using two-handed weapons is a drawback. Not all feats have to be 100% useful in all settings.One ...
  • 03:21 PM - 5ekyu quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    This isn't needless hair splitting. You made a statement that isn't correct. If other hadn't I would have. Before any roll is made, a statement of intent or action by the player must precede it -- this isn't narration. Without a such a statement, how do you know what to roll? The narration is the result of the action. Climbing a wall is a perfect example: Player: I climb the wall in this manner. DM: Sets the DC for Athletics check based on the player's statement. The DC could be anywhere from automatically successful (i.e., using a ladder) to impossible (bare-handed while trying to carry everyone else in the party on his back up a wall made of ice). Player: Rolls if necessary. DM: Narrates the success or failure of the action. Now maybe that is what you meant, but then you misunderstood/misrepresented the person you were responding to. The point they and others were making is that you cannot make a roll much less determine the chance of success unless you have a clear understanding...
  • 12:22 AM - bedir than quoted WaterRabbit in post Fixing the terrible Weapon Master feat
    The real utility of the is feat is to allow players to become proficient in weapons that are not in the standard tables. For example, if you have black powder weapons in you game, players could only become proficient in them using this feat. Or if the campaign focuses on ship to ship combat, the players could become proficient with cannons with this feat. This allows character to become proficient in weapons that would not be available just through multiclassing. In my campaign siege weapons are a tool. They require a crew and don't make sense to just be a proficiency. They also might require different checks for different activities (aim, repair)

Friday, 19th April, 2019

  • 07:52 PM - Chaosmancer quoted WaterRabbit in post Fixing the terrible Weapon Master feat
    The real utility of the is feat is to allow players to become proficient in weapons that are not in the standard tables. For example, if you have black powder weapons in you game, players could only become proficient in them using this feat. Or if the campaign focuses on ship to ship combat, the players could become proficient with cannons with this feat. This allows character to become proficient in weapons that would not be available just through multiclassing. I'd argue that a feat that allows you to become proficient in weapons that most games do not use isn't great. Especially since the tables in the DMG for blackpowder weapons do give the layout for who should get proficiency in them if they are a common staple of your world. So, you are looking at getting proficiency in a weapon that is incredibly rare, and that your DM did not give proficiency for to begin with. That isn't "real utility" that's a niche that it just happens to cover.

Thursday, 18th April, 2019

  • 02:57 PM - Elfcrusher quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    I think, especially in the like of the current troll king scenario being discussed, that explicitly telling the player the DC and the consequence is poor form. At the very least, explaining the consequences would fall actually be the proper use of Insight. A character with low Insight would not be able to predict the troll king's response to his attempt whereas a character with a high Insight would. Also stating the exact DC also seems off. A general sense if the difficulty maybe, but the exact DC? Yeah, I said in the follow-up it wouldn't have to be the exact DC and the exact consequence. It could be, "The king is angry and doesn't seem to be in the mood for rationale discourse; no telling what he will do if an attempt to influence him fails." And then an Insight check, as you suggest, might very well reveal a trait/bond/ideal/flaw (which could then be used to influence him without even having to roll!) As I said to 5ekyu, I was really trying to make the point that I think the playe...

Thursday, 11th April, 2019

  • 04:33 AM - Hussar quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    Disagree. I behooves the creators to make the most effective presentation not necessarily bowing to blind convention. Maybe those of us that grew up with print being the most common medium don't really see this as an issue since changing the orientation of a map is trivial (just rotate the page). Maybe for those who grew up in the digital it seems a much bigger deal since it is more difficult to rotate an image (like two mouse clicks depending on the view software). So, you have to rotate your 200 page (ish) book every time you want to use a map properly and that's "bowing to blind convention"? Again, NEARLY EVERY print map you've ever used in your entire life has put north on the top of the map. And, note, sure, I can just reorient the map, but, in the print product, that's a bit more difficult. You must not use a lot of 45 degree bends if you only give directions like left and right. DM: The corridor T's ahead of you, left and right. Player: So, East and West? DM: No, r...

Tuesday, 9th April, 2019

  • 01:40 AM - Hussar quoted WaterRabbit in post Sneak Peek At Ghosts of Saltmarsh Maps
    I guess that polar projections really give you fits. Transverse Mercator projection might be nightmare inducing event if you ever saw one. McArthur's Universal Corrective Map of the World would probably cause your brain to seize. :) I think you are too caught up in the orientation of the map. If we ever have a magnetic flip in our lifetime your whole world would be turned upside-down. :) A map is just a compact means of communicating spatial relationships. Different orientations serve different purposes. For example: "The New York City Department of Transportation places pedestrian friendly maps around the city with the orientation rotated to be “heads-up” or forward-facing so that viewers are facing the map in the same direction they standing for readability. This helps pedestrians to better orient themselves in relationship to the landmarks on the map and to better navigate the city." from geolounge.com For D&D, most maps have to fit on a standard sheet of paper and a North o...

Saturday, 30th March, 2019

  • 04:42 AM - Chaosmancer quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    Posting a few different thoughts from a long reading of this thread. The question really is should insight be better than the 2nd level spell ZoT? That is subject more to DM interpretation. Also the DC is set by the DM, so a DC 30 for a stranger aligns with the general rule for Insight. I'm curious, does anyone take Insight as a skill in your games? I've got a friend who I play with, sometimes he GM's and he also does not allow Insight checks to decide if strangers are lying to us. He says it is unrealistic because we don't know these people well enough to know that. I never take Insight when he is GMing, because it becomes a useless skill. We are traveling mercenaries who are rarely in the same town twice, let alone spending multiple weeks or months getting to know people in said towns. When the merchant says a bad crop means prices went up, is he gouging the newcomers to town or is this a plot hook? Sure, I can find out by asking around town, after I lose the extra 20 gold they...

Tuesday, 26th March, 2019

  • 11:37 PM - doctorbadwolf quoted WaterRabbit in post How Should Taunting Work?
    You left off a more obvious option on the poll. I wouldn't allow it all inside of combat. The mechanics proposed don't address any player cost. One way to do that is to require the attack action using CHA (non-proficient) verus passive Insight. The target would then use its next attack versus the taunter with no requirement to move or put itself in danger. Also I wouldn't allow non-intelligent or animal intelligent creatures to taunt at all. I would also impose disadvantage on trying to taunt an intelligent creature that has a different cultural basis. Otherwise, this just becomes way to prone for abuse. There is no mechanic for it in the game. It should be a role-play reward or even spending Inspiration to get working. If you don't like the way the DM runs his monsters (which seems to be the thrust here) that is a different discussion. I left it off because it is outside the scope of the question. I’m not interested in any way in the discussion over whether or not it should be allo...
  • 08:10 PM - DEFCON 1 quoted WaterRabbit in post 2d10 for Skill Checks
    I generally like this system, but there is a difference between a combat roll and a skill roll in general. A 20 is an automatic success / crit in combat but not in a general skill check. So, if you use 2d10 for combat, crits will occur much less often. Now in 3e this wasn't as much of an issue since the threat range could get as large as a 15 or better, depending on feats and weapons. But in 5e, using 2d10 it might be necessary to redefine a crit as hitting by more than x (probably 5), but could vary based upon house rules. Heh, yeah... I had actually gone through the math when I was first considering whether or not I would use 2d10 for attacks as well. Had I done it, I would have had critical hits occurring for anyone who rolled an 18, 19 or 20 on the 2d10, as those three numbers produce a 6% chance whereas a nat 20 is a 5% chance. I would have been fine with that extra 1% chance over normal crit... but ended up not using 2d10 for attacks after all.
  • 07:22 PM - Oofta quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    The question really is should insight be better than the 2nd level spell ZoT? That is subject more to DM interpretation. Also the DC is set by the DM, so a DC 30 for a stranger aligns with the general rule for Insight. There's a fairly common trope in fiction of "the human lie detector" and some people probably are slightly better at it than others. However, in my games the only 100% sure-fire way of knowing whether someone is lying is magic. Even then, as you stated there are frequently ways of skirting the truth if using zone of truth. People also remember things incorrectly all the time as well so you probably need hard evidence to be certain. False memories are easily created - see the "lost in the mall false memory" study. Telling the players that they don't need to bother with an insight check because the person is telling the truth makes insight far too powerful for my game. Which is why I would go with the old standby "They seem to be telling the truth". Adjudicating interrogat...
  • 07:01 PM - iserith quoted WaterRabbit in post If an NPC is telling the truth, what's the Insight DC to know they're telling the truth?
    The question really is should insight be better than the 2nd level spell ZoT? That is subject more to DM interpretation. Also the DC is set by the DM, so a DC 30 for a stranger aligns with the general rule for Insight. After reading the spell, it looks to me like zone of truth performs a somewhat different function than a task to observe mannerisms and body language to determine a creature's true intentions. You may even be likelier to get a more evasive response or no response at all from a creature in a zone of truth. Zone of truth probably enhances but does not replace mundane attempts to get at the truth. So I don't really see it as a trade-off that needs balancing.


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