View Profile: Quasqueton - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
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July 17
About Quasqueton
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Far from the nearest settlement, away from traveled routes, and high upon a craggy hill. . .

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Quasqueton's Classic Adventure discussions Friday, 7th May, 2010 01:13 PM

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Tuesday, 24th July, 2018

  • 09:19 AM - Lanefan mentioned Quasqueton in post Everybody Cheats?
    My point is that AD&D uses a wargaming XP system (XP for monsters, plus a few other bits and pieces on the side) yet presents the goal of play as something other than wargaming. In 2e, possibly. In 1e as written, the vast majority of earned xp (at least in published modules of the era) comes from recovery of treasure; assuming the PCs are the least bit efficient at scooping the loot they find. Quasqueton did a bunch of detailed analyses years and years ago on just this; the threads he started to discuss the results are buried in here somewhere if you want to dig 'em up. What socio-political decision does this reveal? I can certainly tell you, as a cold hard fact, that both rather left wing and rather right wing posters on this board have enjoyed 4e. (I am not going to identify said posters, as that would violate board rules, but my judgements of political affiliation are not speculative but based rather on PM correspondence.) In any event, to reiterate and elaborate: the decision is aesthetic. It is a decision that levelling is not a reward of play, but rather a pacing device. It is comparable to the way Pendragon handles time: whereas in Gygax's AD&D time is a resource, to be used sensibly (or squandered foolishly) in improving one's position as a player (see his DMG p 38), in Pendragon one adventure occurs each year. Time in Pendragon is not a resoure, or a reward, but r...

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Tuesday, 9th September, 2014

  • 09:07 PM - Honorlord quoted Quasqueton in post Native Outsider
    Two of the PCs in my group are "Native Outsiders" (a tiefling and a genasi), and I think the DM misunderstands what that means. I need to get some confirmation on this so I can show him proof. Is this correct: Native Outsider means you are an outsider, not a humanoid -- so are not subject to hold person, charm person, and other spells that affect humanoids. You can be raised/resurrected. You cannot be banished/dismissed. Thanks. If he wants to house rule the type, I want him to know its a house rule and not the standard. But I don't think he wants to house rule it, I think he just has misinterpretted the type definition. Quasqueton "Unlike most other living creatures, an outsider does not have a dual nature; its soul and body form one unit." Native Outsiders do have the dual nature hence: " An outsider with the native subtype can be raised, reincarnated, or resurrected just as other living creatures can be." Unlike Outsiders which can not, but rather need a wish spell, miracle, or some other form to bring them back. " Native outsiders breathe, eat, and sleep." Unlike Outsiders which can, but do not have to do these things. This makes native outsiders subject to spells that effect either humanoid or beast, unless specified in the racial description. "Native" means the material plane is their home, making them NOT extraplanar, but native to the material plane. They are getting plenty of benefits for their racial type and subtype as a result of their heritage/bloodline. If the prescribed benefits listed in the racial description are not what you are looking for consult your DM, they may give you options for altern...

Wednesday, 11th December, 2013

  • 05:49 PM - Celebrim quoted Quasqueton in post The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan - your experiences?
    Did you Play or DM this adventure (or both, as some did)? What were your experiences? Did you complete it? What were the highlights for your group? Quasqueton Have played and run it. Using the pregenerated characters and scenario mode (starting from the inside out), this is probably a more lethal dungeon than Tomb of Horrors because the players are put on a hard clock. Tomb of Horrors allows the players to spend days or weeks investigating the environment without cost. In HSoT the PC's will be dead within hours unless they rush headlong through a series of encounters that are well above their capabilities. Playing it was a lot of fun. Great atmosphere. Interesting puzzles. Suffocating to death was a major bummer, but had fun until we died. Running it 1e style was a chore, mostly because I'm now used to a coherent rules set and there is nothing like HSoT to expose the problems with the 1e rules set. While the module tries to create rules subsystems for the various encounters on the fly, invariably the players are going to go out of the box in predictable ways (throwing another player a rope, trying to swim down and pull ...

Wednesday, 3rd July, 2013

  • 03:48 PM - Umbran quoted Quasqueton in post Buying magic items vs. finding magic items
    As a Player (as opposed to a DM), would you rather your PC get money on adventures, with which to purchase magic items of your own choosing? Or would you rather "find" magic items? Do you prefer picking (buying) specific magic items to support your character concept, or do you like building your character based on the magic items he/she finds in the course of adventure? I definitely prefer finding them. I don't typically consider items, bought or found, when "building" a character. But then, I don't normally do the long-range, think many levels ahead form of building that many others do. So, maybe I'm not in the question's target audience. I should note this is a system-agnostic thing, for me, most times. Shadowrun being a clear exception.

Thursday, 14th February, 2013

  • 01:02 AM - tunafish quoted Quasqueton in post um
    Can M&M be used for a Marvel Universe game? Can a Marvel Universe work with the M&M game mechanics? Are there Marvel characters translated to M&M mechanics anywhere? And, can you tell me about the M&M world? Quasqueton Emphatically, NO. there was one game that echoed the simulationist sensation of Marvel heroes like Wolverine, Hulk & Dr. Strange. this was classic Marvel Superheroes by TSR. name the games that allow you to "call your shot" (knock-out or kill) foes with your very first strike? Wolverine factors heavily here, along with Nick Castle/Punisher & Thing, who was prone to K.O. an opponent when the situation required it. few RPGs allow you to "call your shot" & deliver that climactic, cinematic effect you want, scene-to-scene. MSH did it & it's the reason i still use that system for my "generic universal role-playing system". M&M is more "Golden Age", in the sense that it's near-impossible to kill or seriously harm characters with a single attack. the lack of hit points, and having a saving throw mechanic that favors high defenses, prevents this. call me simulationist, but comics simulate the real world, to a degree. using the M&M system, Spider Man or Thing or Colossus can't K.O. a foe b...

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