View Profile: Tyler Do'Urden - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
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About Tyler Do'Urden

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January 19, 1982 (37)
About Tyler Do'Urden
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Paper Street, Menzoberranzan

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Bree-Land Region Guide: A Review Friday, 15th March, 2019 07:48 PM

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Sunday, 17th March, 2019


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Saturday, 19th January, 2019

  • 06:30 AM - barasawa quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Worlds of Design: How "Precise" Should RPG Rules Be?
    That's pretty precise! I wouldn't call it precise, we don't even know if that grog comes in drams, pints, quaffs, kegs, hogsheads, old whiskey barrels, etc. With out the unit measurements, it's kind of meaningless, unless you are just after a ratio with something else measured in the same units. (I so couldn't resist pointing that out, and no, I don't have a propeller beanie. :lol: )

Friday, 18th January, 2019


Saturday, 5th January, 2019

  • 04:18 PM - Jay Verkuilen quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Worlds of Design: “Old School” in RPGs and other Games – Part 1 Failure and Story
    I'd imagine a "very dangerous, high storytelling" game would be possible if the danger was mitigated by having more characters per player. I could imagine running a GoT-style game with a lot of death, cheap character life, and a lot of plot/storytelling... but I guess it wouldn't really be "dangerous" anymore if each player were running four or five characters they weren't particularly attached to, as it would be no different than having one character who was unlikely to die (from the player's perspective). I've played in games like that. Character death is certainly meaningful, or can be. You lose whatever time invested in them and their story, and the group chemistry is often strongly affected. In one game my PC was a young paladin (kinda sorta modeled after Jeanne d'Arc). In the very first encounter, my mentor (another PC, a wizard who'd been my teacher) was killed. That stung for the rest of the game, even though a new and memorable PC showed up in the next session. PCs were altered by their exp...

Wednesday, 5th September, 2018

  • 03:27 AM - StormbringerAUS quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    [QUOTE=Tyler Do'Urden;7489715]Bellairs, John 11 Burroughs, Edgar Rice 17 Carter, Lin 14 de Camp & Pratt 7 Dunsany, Lord 17 Fox, Gardner 11 Leiber, Fritz 19 - 2 = 17 Merritt, A. 16 Offutt, Andrew J. 14 Pratt, Fletcher 12 St. Clair, Margaret 14 Tolkien, J.R.R. 9 + 1 = 10 Wellman, Manley Wade 14 Williamson, Jack 18 Zelazny, Roger 17

Friday, 24th August, 2018

  • 05:42 PM - Jay Verkuilen quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post D&D = American + European Fantasy
    But the rules are there now... and really, the whole point of D&D is that you can modify it however you wish... True, though a lot of times that really depends on the group. I play with two groups, one mostly local and one remote. The local group is quite skeptical of substantial house rules. I understand why, even if I don't totally agree, but that's the group consensus. my question is, why haven't third-party supplements been more "adventurous" in expanding the scope of the game and the rules? It just seems like they produce more of the same. I recall d20 third-party supplements being a lot more daring... Not sure. Part of it might be the fact that they're not too sure what WotC is going to release.
  • 09:39 AM - delericho quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post D&D = American + European Fantasy
    Eh, I don't recall seeing a high level commoner ever statted-out in anything official. Such a creature could theoretically exist, but there were a lot of things in 3e that could theoretically exist that nobody ever bothered with. The settlement construction guidelines in the DMG suggested that most large settlements would have at least one Commoner leveled in the teens. In a metropolis, it wouldn't be terribly uncommon to have an epic-level Commoner present - even before epic levels were even a thing in 3e. Of course, I don't know how common it was to actually use those guidelines. :)

Wednesday, 22nd August, 2018

  • 11:29 PM - CapnZapp quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post D&D = American + European Fantasy
    Which is why there are rules for mundane crafting, magical crafting, and buying and selling magic items right there in Xanathar's guide, of course. Which did not exist for several years of the game's existence, of course. For several years there was heaps and heaps of gold, and next to nothing to spend it on. Not opinion. Fact. Anyway, the playing style where you go from one mission to the next with zero interest in guilds or castle-building is a playing style where the only things you want to buy are things that help you in the next dungeon. In other words, magic items. By the way, this is the playing style encouraged by most of the official hardbacks. When the clock is ticking you don't waste time on downtime.
  • 09:43 PM - Jay Verkuilen quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post D&D = American + European Fantasy
    Well, I'm brand new to 5e, having just picked up the books after a 12 year hiatus from D&D. I'm also constrasting this with 2nd edition, which had no rules at all that I can recall from any book for buying and selling magic, extremely vague crafting rules, and rules for creating items that were contradictory and nearly impossible... I think 5e found a suitable middle ground. From that perspective, yeah, 5E looks better. 1E and 2E's creation rules were pretty strongly on the "don't bother" line, definitely. 3E got out of hand and 4E managed to make magic items both utterly necessary and very boring.
  • 09:25 PM - Jay Verkuilen quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post D&D = American + European Fantasy
    Which is why there are rules for mundane crafting, magical crafting, and buying and selling magic items right there in Xanathar's guide, of course. XGtE was released over three years after the core books, which themselves have numerous categorical statements indicating that the authors didn't want anyone making anything or really even buying much of anything. No, they're not as granular as 3e... but they have a great deal of flexibility to them. To me, having random pricing and haggling for rare and exotic items, and potential complications with making them, is a lot more interesting than the set prices and procedures of 3e. True, they are out there, and there are some interesting bits, though they're very much written in a "don't bother" mode. Check out the costs for scribing scrolls, for instance. (I don't have the book in front of me to check, but recall it being super crazy expensive.)

Monday, 20th August, 2018

  • 12:04 AM - JonnyP71 quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Survivor D&D Computer Games- Baldur's Gate WINS!
    Baldur's Gate 26 Baldur's Gate II -1 What? You're all downvoting the wrong one! BG was the first Infinity Engine game... but also the worst. Low-level play, lots of dull wandering, and just generally a clunky outing - I could never finish it. BG II was better in every single way. As the clock ticks past midnight to signify a new day here in the UK, I take great delight in confirming the rightful winner. Lower level play is a plus. You call it wandering, I call it exploration - also a plus. I've finished it about a dozen times - compared to the sequel just twice. The only game in which I've invested more hours was the original Sid Meier's Civilization. A worthy winner. The original. The best.

Tuesday, 14th August, 2018

  • 05:43 AM - DMMike quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post FRP RPG sucks
    I'm pretty sure that the OP's first language is not English. I'm pretty sure that the OP is Microsoft's Twitter bot, reprogrammed with a slightly nerdier bent.

Friday, 3rd August, 2018

  • 08:09 PM - Dannyalcatraz quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post FRP RPG sucks
    I'm pretty sure that the OP's first language is not English. It’s possible, even probable. But there are a LOT of words run together, and that’s editing/formatting.
  • 04:56 PM - BookBarbarian quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Survivor D&D Computer Games- Baldur's Gate WINS!
    I remember when it first came out and I could only control one character plus a sidekick. We could play multiplayer with parties... but it wasn't like the Infinity Engine games. The main campaign of NWN 1 single player had only on follower. the Hordes of the Underdark expansion increase that to 2. It was NWN 2 where you controlled a party of 4.
  • 04:06 PM - Sacrosanct quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Survivor D&D Computer Games- Baldur's Gate WINS!
    AD&D: Cloudy Mountain 15 Baldur's Gate 24 Baldur's Gate II 26 Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance Series 14 Chronicles of Mystara 20 Dungeons & Dragons Online 4 Eye of the Beholder Series 21 Gold Box: Pool of Radiance Series 17 Gold Box: Dragonlance Series 20 Gold Box: Savage Frontier Series 20 Gold Box: Spelljammer 18 Icewind Dale 18 Icewind Dale II 20 Neverwinter Nights 24 Couldn't get into it. Found it a disappointment after BG/IWD/Torment. Mainly because there were no parties or NPCs. Neverwinter Nights II 22 Planescape: Torment 21 SSI Dark Sun Series 18 Temple of Elemental Evil 16 Warriors of the Eternal Sun 19 We posted at almost the same time, so you'll need to update your results with my votes. Also, I'm a bit confused. Neverwinter nights was party based and had NPCS. Are you thinking of a different game perhaps?

Tuesday, 31st July, 2018


Thursday, 5th July, 2018

  • 09:56 PM - Shiroiken quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Level Advancement and In-Campaign Time
    If you have such an issue with it, don't run an epic adventure that forces PCs to manically run around from level 1-20 without a break. Run several adventures that have weeks, months, or even years between them. Adventures in Middle Earth uses this standard, with each adventure (and subsequent downtime) taking up a year. The Training Downtime option in XGtE can slow down adventuring as well, forcing time for leveling up. Myself, I only allow characters to level up after an adventure, and if you push things such that you would get enough XP to skip a level, instead you stop gaining XP at 1 short of that level. As I run a West Marches style game, this really hasn't been an issue. I'm also considering adding the Training downtime option as well, forcing people to play different characters while their current one levels. That’s one thing that’s bothered me for a long time. By the tables of 1e/2e, it was possible to have a 20th level 16-year-old fighter, because no one bothered to do anything about the...
  • 09:20 PM - Irda Ranger quoted Tyler Do'Urden in post Level Advancement and In-Campaign Time
    Well, there is fiction that moves THAT fast: Wheel of Time. I love the WoT, but that part actually bothered me. It was sort of hand-waived away that the protagonists were all Ta'veren / chosen by the Light / agents of the Pattern, or whatever. But people progressed in skill in weird ways. Like Matt went from unassuming farmboy to quarterstaff super-ninja overnight with just a throwaway line about how he used to win the village staff-fighting contests as a boy. Um, okay, I guess practicing against farmboys lets you take on the two best warder students at the same time while you're sick. <hand jerk motion> Everyone in Wot who wasn't one of the half-dozen main young protagonists advanced more like the way I'm describing. Lan took decades to become the best swordsman in the world. The non-protagonist Aes Sedai studied at the Tower for decades or even over a century. Etc.

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