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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 22nd May, 2018, 06:09 AM
    Yeah, at three you are good to get them into a game as complex as 'Monkey Madness' or 'Go Away Monster'. Make believe is possible, but structured RP is going to be right out. Give it another two years or so, and you'll be able to get them into some lightweight kid systems.
    11 replies | 285 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Monday, 21st May, 2018, 09:33 PM
    So far as I can tell, Durkon is concealing something about Odin's prophesy and maneuvering to put the vampires in a position where Odin or his followers will be able to intervene. In particular, he's now moved the combat to what appears to be Odin's sacred ground, and the next day is Wednesday, Odin's sacred day. Odin set this whole thing up. Loki is obviously in on it. The question is...
    5 replies | 268 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Monday, 21st May, 2018, 08:25 PM
    Ack. That's a lot of failed caster level checks and a lot of failed Will saving throws.
    5 replies | 216 view(s)
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  • Mercule's Avatar
    Monday, 21st May, 2018, 01:41 PM
    To me, Ovinomancer's graphis very communicative. Funny you should pick "between an 7 and 14" as your range. Based on the graph (and I see no flaw with the math after looking at it more), advantage is roughly between 8-15% better than hero points, in that range. The two are equally beneficial at a roll-to-succeed (RTS) of 18 and hero points are way better than advantage above a RTS 18. No...
    42 replies | 852 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Sunday, 20th May, 2018, 06:28 PM
    Well, prior to Ovinomancer's post, I was going to say the two were probably about even,other than the potential for +d6 giving a chance for results above 20. My gut still says something's a bit off with that graph, but I haven't gone through the math, myself. Basically, advantage is roughly equal to a +5 bonus at a DC 11, tapering to an effective +1 (or marginally less) at either end. The d6...
    42 replies | 852 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Sunday, 20th May, 2018, 06:15 PM
    I GM, but I can't remember the last time a concentration check came into play. It does a pretty good job of limiting multi-buff scenarios, but the party is also pretty good about keeping their support well defended.
    21 replies | 860 view(s)
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  • haakon1's Avatar
    Sunday, 20th May, 2018, 03:31 AM
    I prefer Greyhawk too.
    36 replies | 1220 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 18th May, 2018, 03:57 PM
    Pets are just that, pets. They have no magical or special connection to the player character, and they do not improve as a result of the character increasing levels. As I run them, animal companions will basically understand any instruction that their human companion gives them, and will act on those instructions to the best of their ability without lengthy training. Pets only understand...
    2 replies | 198 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 18th May, 2018, 01:48 AM
    So, the game is specifically the experience of play that occurs at the table. It's composed of a bunch of stuff - rules, metarules (how we think about play often unconsciously), procedures of play (how we decide to apply the rules), how we prepare to play, and the individual social characteristics and goals of the player. The author appears to be focusing on the game world as an element of...
    12 replies | 395 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 15th May, 2018, 11:19 PM
    Totally agree with this. Diggers tend to be less problematic as the majority of really good diggers have not traditionally been tamable or even trainable in D&D. They are also by their nature almost impossible to cage and control, and expensive to feed. Charmed diggers represent fairly high level magic and as such are on the level of 'defenses against teleport'. So the only time you really...
    26 replies | 785 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 15th May, 2018, 08:04 PM
    While it certainly took a trebuchet a long time to reduce a wall, it took less time to reduce a wall with a steady barrage of stones than it took to starve out a castle and in the long run success was basically inevitable unlike other risky approaches like sapping. Trebuchet were used on many occasions to reduce the walls of a city or castle between their introduction in the 11th century and the...
    26 replies | 785 view(s)
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  • haakon1's Avatar
    Tuesday, 15th May, 2018, 03:32 AM
    That looks cool. I was thinking of an inland adventure, but this would fit in my campaign world (my version of Greyhawk) on the coast of Blackmoor. Maybe I’ll ask if they want icy or forested.
    5 replies | 290 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Monday, 14th May, 2018, 05:12 AM
    Well, first, by the late middle ages torsion and gravity based siege weapon technology had advanced to the point that in point of fact if you had enough money you could knock down the walls of pretty much anything with a trebuchet. It was just a matter of time. But for the most part, this was nothing really knew. The whole point of a castle was to delay a large force with a small force until...
    26 replies | 785 view(s)
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  • haakon1's Avatar
    Monday, 14th May, 2018, 03:52 AM
    My opinion ... “From the Ashes” was produced to take Greyhawk from its roots with Gygax, his home campaign, and the game e dominated in the AD&D era. FTA made it TSR’s corporate property, a dark alternative setting to contrast it with “Forgotten Realms” as the “regular” 2e setting. Gygax’s boxed set had knights riding from a castle on the cover. FTA had the same image with a Zombie horse. ...
    3 replies | 306 view(s)
    1 XP
  • haakon1's Avatar
    Sunday, 13th May, 2018, 05:21 PM
    Thanks for this, and the link. I am currently think of running the “Valley of the Snails” adventure, but with some edits. Does this sound reasonable: 1) Start and setting remain as written. Village on the edge of forbidding Dim Forest, missing Ranger, go find him. Several wilderness encounters and random monster table also as written. 2) Change a lascivious Satyr encounter that was...
    5 replies | 290 view(s)
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  • haakon1's Avatar
    Sunday, 13th May, 2018, 04:54 PM
    For personality, I either: 1) Make it up as I go along. Maybe just an alignment for a mook in the crowd, then I invent backstory and personality from there if the person becomes relevant. Often for characters involved in combat, the personality “reveals” itself in play. For example, the most recent NPC to get “spontaneous depth” was an archer at the Temple of Elemental Evil, one of many...
    10 replies | 441 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 11th May, 2018, 07:09 PM
    I'd also encourage you to search for threads on EnWorld. The topic has been repeatedly discussed at very great length, and the response you may receive to this thread does not necessarily reflect the mania the fanbase has for this topic - just the fact they've done it to death.
    26 replies | 785 view(s)
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  • haakon1's Avatar
    Friday, 11th May, 2018, 08:12 AM
    haakon1 started a thread Beginner adventure?
    I’ve seen and answered a few threads like this, but it’s always a good question. My brother-in-law is visiting with his 10 & 8 year old, and wants me to DM for them, to get them off devices. I really know 3.5 best, and I’ve run a ton of stuff in Greyhawk, specifically Bissel, which makes that easiest for me, so a forest or mountain setting (definitely not sea coast or island) would work....
    5 replies | 290 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 8th May, 2018, 02:51 PM
    In general, architectural details are unwelcome to me, because climate and geography tends to determine every feature of architecture and if I'm generating a village I generally know the climate and so can guess at the architecture. If you are going to give architectural suggestions, I'd suggest limiting your generator to embellishments like how the buildings are painted, carved, decorated, or...
    10 replies | 410 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Sunday, 6th May, 2018, 10:05 PM
    I've been toying with wholesale replacing the traits with character Aspects from Fate and using Fate Points through the lens of Inspiration (compels and invokes provide advantage/disadvantage a la Inspiration). One of the reasons I haven't is because I'm afraid that, once I started tacking on Fate bits to D&D, it would be a slow creep towards replacing all the rules. I'm not sure that'd be a...
    42 replies | 1814 view(s)
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  • Mercule's Avatar
    Sunday, 6th May, 2018, 09:55 PM
    I use the average from the PHB (6 for Fighter, etc.). Seems to work well enough. My caveat is that I've fully embraced the "3rd is the new 1st" mentality and have never really considered anything above 11th level, or so, to be interesting. So, that's a pretty narrow band of "works for me".
    17 replies | 794 view(s)
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  • Mercule's Avatar
    Sunday, 6th May, 2018, 09:52 PM
    Baldur's Gate 16 Blackmoor 12 City of Brass 13 City State of the Invincible Overlord 11 Free City of Greyhawk 15 Lankhmar 8 Sharn 13 Sigil 12 Stormreach 8
    600 replies | 11770 view(s)
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  • Mercule's Avatar
    Sunday, 6th May, 2018, 09:49 PM
    My inner voice would not permit me to read your abbreviation correctly. Your boss monsters are harsh, man.
    42 replies | 1814 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 4th May, 2018, 07:44 PM
    I don't think it's fair to try to have this conversation here, but if you wanted to start a new thread on the aesthetics of play (that is, what about a game you or others find to be fun) and how we can match our preparation, rules, and procedures of play to those aesthetics of play I'd find that a very enjoyable conversation. In particular, one of the few things I feel confident I understand...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 4th May, 2018, 02:36 PM
    Well, I think the thread is dead. On the 'sock puppet' front, I actually read several score pages of the blog, and my first impression as I was reading had been the 'Carl' was The Tao as well. But then a Carl was mentioned in one article, and though I'm not completely sure, I think our Carl/Simon is the guy mentioned by the blogger as the one that created the wiki for The Tao. In other...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Wednesday, 2nd May, 2018, 08:53 PM
    Well, except in various blog posts he repeatedly claims to be playing D&D, and one of the posts you linked to as proof of the quality of his work contained a rant about how no one needed to play any other system but D&D because it was best if everyone was familiar with a system. So, whether he's running D&D seems to be a matter of debate. If he is running D&D as he claims, then he's definitely...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Wednesday, 2nd May, 2018, 08:34 PM
    *sigh* I recognize that there are tables that have that social contract, but it's a really dumb social contract that you usually find among tables where one or more players have been burned repeatedly by some jerk (or are themselves jerks) and instead of dealing with the problem as a social problem they blame the game, as if there was some sort of perfect game that could be run that didn't...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Wednesday, 2nd May, 2018, 08:28 PM
    But you can't. Further, trying to do so isn't a very advanced goal. It's a red herring an inexperience GM will attempt when they start to fetishize realism as a solution to the problems that they are having at the table. I mean, seriously, this conversation is like being stuck in the late 80's. By the early to mid 90's people had actually done the things you and the blogger have intended to...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Wednesday, 2nd May, 2018, 08:01 PM
    No, it isn't. Randomness isn't an aesthetic of play. Randomness can be a tool you use to uphold a desired aesthetic of play - in particular because the world seems to be random and people are very bad at creating the illusion of randomness without resorting to a random number generator - but the real purpose of an encounter table isn't in and of itself to be random. Randomness is just one...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Wednesday, 2nd May, 2018, 07:13 PM
    That's not advanced. You have a very primitive goal when what you are trying to do is make an encounter table based on a realistic biome. The reason for that is that the real purpose of an encounter table is not to simulate a biome. If you try to do that, and you actually put your results into play, what you'll discover is that your encounter table is actually a non-encounter table, and that...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 1st May, 2018, 04:23 AM
    Well, to each their own.
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 1st May, 2018, 01:11 AM
    I came up with the goal from 'The Tao of D&D', who in a recent article explained the purpose of revising dragons with the quote I used. Respectfully, I disagree. The game is very recognizably AD&D and still draws heavily on AD&D material as source books and inspiration, for most of its terminology, it's classes and for the greater part of its rules. The game described therein is actually...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Monday, 30th April, 2018, 09:16 PM
    No. Or rather, at least not in my campaign. Summon spells make use of spirits who are pretty much always on standby looking for some excuse to meddle in the natural world. They willing come to fight on behalf of magic wielders in order to further their ends. It's basically like calling a temporary staffing agency and leaving out a magical calling card. Anyone that answers the card would...
    24 replies | 658 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Sunday, 29th April, 2018, 11:11 PM
    Well, in my incredibly not so humble opinion, "Yes. Yes there is." Honestly, I'm not that impressed. Granted, much of this is a matter of taste but I find that people who do nothing but snear at the work of others tend to just have particular tastes and don't critically look at their own work. That isn't to say that their work might not be good - they might be Luke Crane - but often the...
    119 replies | 2977 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Saturday, 28th April, 2018, 03:06 AM
    I do agree with you on the Jedi. Basically, a full fledged Jedi does have the problem that they don't need a party. So the only way to leave them in is not let you become a full fledged Jedi. In any setting where full Jedi appear, pretty much you have to have an all Jedi party. Which is why I only like to play Star Wars in the gap between the Clone Wars and A New Hope. P.S. It actually...
    22 replies | 808 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Saturday, 28th April, 2018, 02:50 AM
    Well it depends on what you mean by that. The main storyline of Star Wars revolves too much around the dreaded 'Chosen One' plotline that basically has no part in any RPG. But the Star Wars universe, and the setting itself, actually makes an excellent RPG setting and one you can tell a story that feels like Star Wars in. I give you things like the original Han Solo trilogy, and 'Rogue One'...
    22 replies | 808 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 27th April, 2018, 07:28 PM
    I don't at all disagree, but often the reason people want to play a particular game that is tied to a setting is that they want to recreate the feel of a particularly story. And quite often, people find that certain stories just don't lend themselves to RPG frameworks in that way.
    22 replies | 808 view(s)
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  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 27th April, 2018, 07:07 PM
    Stranger Things itself is not at all suited to an RPG treatment, for many of the reasons that the story is imploding on itself. Eleven simply doesn't need to belong to a party. She's the only Player Character in the story, and everyone else is ultimately just supporting cast. It's like having a Justice League formed of Wonder Woman and a half dozen ordinary school kids.
    22 replies | 808 view(s)
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About Celebrim

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Past 6 years running a homebrew campaign using a rules set evolved from 3e D&D.
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Would very much like a one off in Dread or Fiasco from an experienced GM.

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USA
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Past 6 years running a homebrew campaign using a rules set evolved from 3e D&D.
More information:
Would very much like a one off in Dread or Fiasco from an experienced GM.

Wednesday, 23rd May, 2018


Tuesday, 15th May, 2018


Friday, 11th May, 2018


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Friday, 20th April, 2018

  • 10:06 PM - Imaro mentioned Celebrim in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    ...e available beyond just foot, should I not find what I want here in Karnos and decide to try elsewhere? Are there any unusual local customs or modes of dress etc. that I need to be aware of? Etc., and I haven't even got to nation-region-world-astronomy questions yet. If much of this wasn't provided ahead of time (i.e. this part of the world wasn't built) then I - as would, I suspect, many players - would be asking most of these questions before I ever get around to declaring an action! Even if the questions don't directly inform my action declaration right now they'll inform my general approach later; and very little of this is stuff players should be expected to just make up on their own (and if they do then the GM has to be scribbling like a madman to record all of it in the interests of future consistency - why not just do this work beforehand when you've time to relax and think it through?) Just wanted to comment on this part of your post as it ties back to the point I think @Celebrim was making earlier in the thread... mainly that @pemerton doesn't play a strictly no myth game. He's stated that he uses pre-authored content including geography, deities, names, places, etc. I think the confusion arises because he then creates a distinction (which honestly I'm still not necessarily clear on where the line is actually drawn) between the things he pre-authors and world-building. However my understanding on no myth gaming (and I don't claim to be an expert) is that everything is created during play. What I feel like @pemerton has done is created a hybrid of the two styles while claiming it's no myth which is actually serving to confuse alot of the issues. Personally I'd love if someone could point to some actual play video or streaming of no myth gaming... the only one I can think of that uses no myth gaming is the episode on Tabletop where they play FATE... and the only thing they establish before play is the State the game takes place in. EDIT: Just to note the...
  • 05:59 PM - Ancalagon mentioned Celebrim in post Cultures in D&D/roleplaying: damned if you do, damned if you don't
    I wouldn't put it as strongly as you Celebrim , but I do thank you for the kind words. And you are correct that I am troubled by a set of "rules" that seem limiting and short sighted. If a goal is to be respectful of others (and this seems laudable), and the pursuit of that goal results in gaming/fiction/etc that pretends others don't exist... then we have failed to attain that goal.

Thursday, 5th April, 2018

  • 04:31 PM - Pauper mentioned Celebrim in post What SHOULD be the purpose of magic items in an RPG?
    Within the D&D universe (and the universes deliberately designed to be similar to it, such as Pathfinder's Golarion and Hackmaster's default universe, etcetera), magic exists as a tool -- it is defined, has specific effects, and requires explicit factors to be in place (class, level, components, etc.) before it can be used. In that sense, the 'why' of magic items in D&D is that they are tools that can be used by classes that don't otherwise get to use magic (healing potions are probably the ur-example here), or they are tools that can be used by classes that do get magic to either do magic they don't normally get to do or do so magic they do get to do more efficiently. I have a good deal of respect for Celebrim and his desire to make magic 'numenous', but as he points out, execution is much harder than conception, and D&D as a system has basically given up on making magic items 'special' save in a few specific instances where 'special' equates more with 'powerful' than with 'exotic'. The way most players approach magic items has adopted this pragmatism: if you ask a player what the purpose of a magic weapon is, his answer will likely be that it's to bypass the defenses of monsters resistant to non-magical weapons. This is a big reason why players complain when a DM is seen as 'stingy' with magic weapons -- players don't like to feel 'ineffective', even if the resistance to non-magic weapons is an intentional game design decision. Fifth edition has tried to reduce the importance of magic items, and has even taken steps to reduce the 'characters are magic item carrying platforms' concept of Third and Fourth edition D&D, but some players insist on collecting loads of magic items because th...

Wednesday, 4th April, 2018

  • 09:40 PM - Gradine mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    I'm not going to touch the broader debate except to mention for full disclosure that my sympathies lie a lot more with the individualist concerns of the grassroots movements. Perhaps you missed it, because my original post read "how is the academic definition useful?", but I realized my mistake and edited it to say "how is the academic definition useful here?" That's a fair point. I suppose I was just trying to cover my bases? To be honest, it seems like both of you are guilty of attributing nefarious motives to the other, and that's driving a lot of the frustration. Because, of course, once you see someone attributing nefarious motives to you, it's only natural to think they must have nefarious motives for doing so... To be perfectly honest, I have a significant amount of respect for Celebrim; he's intelligent and logical and I genuinely get the sense that his heart is honestly in the right place. He's in fact said as much about me as well (well, the heart-in-the-right place bit, anyway, I'm not sure what he thinks about my intellectual or logical capacities at this point :-P). I do have a tendency to let my heart get ahead of my head in discussions such as these, and get heated and say things which I kind of mean but which are unkind and unhelpful and usually apply to other people within the conversation, which tend to come out because I don't tend to reply to those individuals. Which is, I'll admit, pretty awful of me. These are all things I've been working on but clearly haven't mastered yet. And I can also see how I do try to shoehorn in other subjects that I really feel are really relevant at the time but in hindsight are maybe... relevant-adjacent, I'll say. Relevant from my perspective, sure, but probably way more of interest to me than anyone else in the thread. ...
  • 06:37 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    I'm not offended by worthless ideas. I'm also not in the minority here. Race is of absolutely no issue in the game as it stands. At least not to any appreciable number of people. Then how do you explain the change in Pathfinder? If it is of absolutely no issue, then, why is the #2 game changing it and why have a number of other RPG's changed it as well? And, frankly Maxperson, how is it possible to have a conversation with you when you absolutely refuse to acknowledge the other side's point? Whether you agree or not, fair enough. But, you're starting the conversation with "anyone who complains about this is such a tiny minority who shouldn't even be acknowledged". That makes it pretty hard to have any sort of conversation. And, as another point, I'd like to thank BryonD for illustrating my point. Having internalized his own interpretations to such a degree that he cannot even consider that those interpretations aren't actually part of the game. Compare that to Celebrim's elf example, that at least isn't counter-factual some of the time. In AD&D, since the rules were silent on the issue, any interpretation is equally valid. Of course, that means that the "nurture" interpretation is just as valid as the "nature" one. Now, after AD&D, the "nature" interpretation is flat out false since it actually contradicts what's written in the game. Like I said, I'm not terribly fussed abou this. Just bemused that people who spend this much time thinking about the game are so blind to their own internalizations.

Tuesday, 3rd April, 2018

  • 12:26 PM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    ...t. Oh, totally agree. What a DM does in his or her own game is none of my or anyone else's business. That's groovy. What bemuses me though is when people mistake their homebrew for what is actually in the game. They've done it a certain way for so long that they are no longer even aware that they have made changes and then start to argue that the way they've done it is somehow the "right" way of doing it, despite not actually being supported by the game itself. And, frankly, I agree that I wouldn't really want the game to be changed so much that race/origin/whateverdahellwefinallysettleon is a la carte. A baseline elf has elven weapon proficiencies. I'm groovy with that. That's the baseline. If you want to deviate from that (such as AngryDM has) then go right ahead. But, as an argument that somehow those proficiencies are innate to elves is actually not supported by the game. Granted, I'm banging the drum here on a single example, and I don't really mean to pick on Celebrim here actually. It was just something that stuck in my head. The argument is that race is the best term because race encapsulates elements that are not necessarily captured by, say, species because of the existence of magic. And, sure, darkvision (or whatever you want to call it) or trance, yup, that's pretty inherent in being an elf. But, that is still covered by terms like heritage or ancestry.
  • 09:29 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    What amuses and bemuses me the most in these types of topics is just how much people have internalized their own interpretations to the point where they can no longer distinguish their own idiosyncratic takes from what is actually stated in the game. For example, angryDM talks about the elf raised in a human city not being proficient in longswords and bows. Celebrim then claims that such proficiencies are the result of the nature of elves. Elves innately know how to use swords and bows. Only problem with that is that it's not true. It's certainly not true in 5e where, while high and wood elves get it, drow do not. They are all elves after all. If it was innate to being an elf, then everyone would have the same thing. Drow aren't proficient in any bows. Plus, it's specifically called out as Elf Weapon Training. Kinda says it right there in the title. In 3e, it's also called out as training - "Elves esteem the arts of swordplay and archery , so all elves are familiar with these weapons" (3e PHB p 16). 2e is silent on the issue - elves simply gain +1 to hit with bows and swords. There is no background given whatsoever. So, angryDM's point is pretty valid. For a good chunk of the game's history, elves do not gain any innate understanding of swords or bows. So, why does being an elf grant automatic proficiencies?

Thursday, 29th March, 2018

  • 01:09 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    Heh, it's nice to agree with Celebrim, just for the novelty of it. :D Yeah, I'm pretty solidly gamist, with a dose of narrativist in my play, so, yeah, Sim play is pretty much bottom of my list of priorities.

Wednesday, 28th March, 2018

  • 01:58 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    To be honest, I look at your list, Celebrim, and pretty much shrug and play on. These things just don't bother me. Web doesn't work because it needs two anchors? Ok, fair enough. It just doesn't work. 1/day non-magical powers? Fantastic. It's a game, it needs balance. No skin off my nose. Like I said, it just doesn't bother me. I simply cannot get up the energy to get bothered by this stuff anymore. I just want to play. If the game says X and X is fun? Good enough for me.

Monday, 26th March, 2018

  • 11:44 PM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    Celebrim - whereas I ran 3e/3.5 for quite a few years and rarely had any of the issues that seem to trouble you so much. We just didn't. The game ran best when we just stopped trying to fiddle with it. Again, it's all about different experiences. It has very little to do with stability and more to do with the fact that I have zero interest in learning another game, particularly someone's home-brew one. Again, I just don't. Note, RAW =/= you must accept every single book. Where is that part of RAW? RAW means that the rules that you use, you follow. Not, just because it's in a book somewhere, that we're not using, we still must abide by. That would be bizarre to reference a book that no one is using.
  • 01:51 PM - Mercule mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    Now, here is one area where we are in 100% agreement. I've largely come to the same conclusions that you have here. Yes, it's fun to bang out new mechanics, but, watching what people post has made me realize that many people are very bad at it. Like you say, they either set the numbers too high or too low and wind up with mechanics that just aren't all that good. I'll agree with this, too. I'd say I'm better than average, but that doesn't mean I always get it right the first time. Even the pros play test stuff. Heh, it's funny Celebrim, while I was writing my answer to Mercule, I did have you in mind when I mentioned 3 inch binders. :p And, I know, from your posts, that you spend incredible amounts of time on your game. Fantastic stuff. But, I also know myself well enough that I would be a very bad fit at your table. I just would. The constant rule changes would bug the heck out of me and I would wind up spending far more time whinging about this or that rule change than actually playing. :D I've gotten very used to playing in groups where RAW is generally the baseline we're all working from. From 3e onwards, the groups I played in and DM'd have generally tried to adhere to RAW. It works better for us. I'm not interested in playing amateur game designer nor am I interested, particularly in indulging anyone else's amateur game designer proclivities. I just want to play the game that we've agreed to sit down and play. I didn't have a 3" binder, but I did use one of those legal accordion folders and I'm p...
  • 02:35 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    ...ad an idea about what they wanted to achieve the rules change that they were proposing rarely achieved that. Some where the equivalent of Monte Haul GMs that were handing out treasure in the form of broken rules, and others where the equivalent of death dungeon DMs that wanted to change the rules to "keep players in their place". Most of my posts from that era consisted of me trying to explain to some young DM why they probably shouldn't change the rules until they had a bit more experience and a very concrete reason why they wanted to change something and what they hoped to achieve by that change. Now, here is one area where we are in 100% agreement. I've largely come to the same conclusions that you have here. Yes, it's fun to bang out new mechanics, but, watching what people post has made me realize that many people are very bad at it. Like you say, they either set the numbers too high or too low and wind up with mechanics that just aren't all that good. Heh, it's funny Celebrim, while I was writing my answer to Mercule, I did have you in mind when I mentioned 3 inch binders. :p And, I know, from your posts, that you spend incredible amounts of time on your game. Fantastic stuff. But, I also know myself well enough that I would be a very bad fit at your table. I just would. The constant rule changes would bug the heck out of me and I would wind up spending far more time whinging about this or that rule change than actually playing. :D I've gotten very used to playing in groups where RAW is generally the baseline we're all working from. From 3e onwards, the groups I played in and DM'd have generally tried to adhere to RAW. It works better for us. I'm not interested in playing amateur game designer nor am I interested, particularly in indulging anyone else's amateur game designer proclivities. I just want to play the game that we've agreed to sit down and play.

Sunday, 25th March, 2018

  • 12:28 AM - pming mentioned Celebrim in post What Has Caused the OSR Revival?
    Hiya! @Celebrim, I think I get where you are coming from. From what I gather, you're arguing that having "stuff" in the rules, available to the players, helps fuel their imaginations and helps them reach for goals that are otherwise not mentioned/suggested. Is that a fair assessment? If it is...then I agree. I am a firm believer that a two or three sentence description of an "adventure" (for example) serves a much better purpose than a two or three page description of it. I guess the "less is more" paradigm is at the fore in this case. For example, I would rather have a paragraph in the PHB, under Magic-User say something like: "Magic-Users are always striving for more knowledge. Many will head down various intellectual pursuits such as astronomy, geography/geology, flora and fauna, biology, etc, trying to find new ways in which the great mysteries of magic can be understood, harnessed, and used for creating new spells, items, construction, and so forth". I would much rather have that (and I thi...

Tuesday, 13th March, 2018

  • 07:42 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy meets Medieval Europe
    Thomas B - don't let Celebrim worry you too much. I'd amend his claims to be closer to, "If you post this on En World with the pretensions that you are an expert and that any and all criticisms can be brushed away" then you might have problems. Otherwise, nobody is going to bother you in the slightest about this. We reap what we sow after all.

Thursday, 8th March, 2018

  • 10:54 PM - Grogg of the North mentioned Celebrim in post Poll: Gaseous form vampire is surrounded...is it "stuck"?
    The spell allows you to pass through "Mere cracks" so I would say yes. I will also agree with Celebrim that a creature that completely takes up its square would prevent movement, such as a gelatinous cube. Its movement would also be impeded if you could surrounded it with liquid (some sort of wall of water?) or if you had something like Wind Wall cast.

Wednesday, 7th March, 2018

  • 10:14 PM - doctorbadwolf mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy Meets Africa
    @Celebrim no one, anywhere, is saying that you can’t tell stories that are about a black woman if you’re a white guy. They’re saying that you do not have the relevant experience to tell a story that is about the specific experience of being a black woman in America, for instance, when you are a white dude. As for the idea that there are no struggles that aren’t common to “the human experience”...that is literally just blatant nonsense.
  • 11:05 AM - Aldarc mentioned Celebrim in post Your single favourite RPG book?
    Without question, Green Ronin's "The Book of the Righteous".This was my first thought too. IMHO, it was really the first book from the d20 3.X era that got religion right in terms of making a living pantheon and series of cults. Fundamentally it got something incredibly basic right, namely, "you do realize that people will actually want to worship/venerate these gods, right?" Honorable Mentions: mainly for being settings that influenced how I think about settings, and I respect a certain degree of coherency of the the first two listed settings in particular. * Eberron Campaign Setting Book * Numenera * Blue Rose (and the True20 book) Also, Fate Core (and Accelerated). I think that Fate Accelerated presented a more concise depiction of how Fate works, so it made a lot of it digestible for me when I was first looking into the system. I don't think that the writing is all that great, as Celebrim mentions, but once you get past the "pedestrian" writing, there are a lot of gems. I do think that some of the better explanations of the basic rules actually come from some of their other games (e.g., Atomic Robo, Young Centurions) or from 3rd party published settings (e.g., Jadepunk).
  • 12:41 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy Meets Africa
    ...a at all. If you got to be extra respectful to Africa but you can safely portray any non-English European ethnic group as a bunch of drunks that love to fight, guess which group is going to be your "ethnic color"? If some extra wheel starts spinning in your head when you see pictures of people with different skin color than you that causes you to treat that presentation differently, that ought to be a great big huge warning flag about something other than what you are looking at. That extra wheel doesn't help the industry become "more inclusive". It just is a big red flag to avoid any sort of controversy (sort of like what this thread might be with respect to publishing articles about Africa). This is total bull. There are any number of norse inspired modules that don't look like this. Heck, bullywugs? Seriously? And, we've even got historically (semi) accurate D&D supplements like the 2e Viking supplement which at least tries to be somewhat grounded in history. IOW, no, Celebrim, you are absolutely wrong here. Sure, there might be double standard modules like you describe, but, there are also ones that aren't. Which isn't true in D&D of anything African inspired. Which is the whole point.

Tuesday, 6th March, 2018

  • 03:43 PM - Doug McCrae mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy Meets Africa
    Celebrim Looking back on content I've created in the past I would say that I have fallen into the trap of associating black people with animals. For example in a superhero scenario that had about 40 characters there was one black NPC and I made her a Tigra type. On another occasion I used the wereleopard bit as the main antagonists when the PCs visited West Africa. In thinking about this and interrogating my choices I certainly don't think I'm being "deeply thoughtful and intellectual" but I do, quite strongly, feel that it's the right thing to do. Regarding treating fantasy Viking land in the same way, the big difference is that today in Western society people of Scandinavian heritage are not subject to discrimination due to beliefs about their lack of intelligence and propensity to violence that are rooted in 19th century scientific racism and people of sub-Saharan African heritage are. I don't see awareness of a double standard as itself being a double standard. If it is then it's a po...

Saturday, 3rd March, 2018



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Wednesday, 16th May, 2018

  • 07:56 PM - Derren quoted Celebrim in post Castles in a D&D/Fantasy setting
    I've honestly never figured out what the counter measure is short of having an air force of your own. I don't think there is. You would need a readily available weapon which range can match the flight high of the common flight monsters/animals. And the existence of such weapon would change the warfare completely. Or you are back to high level magic everywhere to summon storms Nod. I never found it wonderfully compelling, but it is an old idea worth mentioning, since the setting is pocked with the darn things. ;) The role of a dungeon in defense would be different from a castle, like a castle it could be a (even less pleasant) refuge, but it couldn't just command a high point and be a factor that way, able to survey and threaten the land around. Dungeon defenders' only option would be to sally, and, sure, they might have a lot of secret exits for that purpose. OTOH, a dungeon doesn't have towers & pennants, so where it is might be something the attackers have to figure out....
  • 12:22 AM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post Castles in a D&D/Fantasy setting
    Diggers tend to be less problematic as the majority of really good diggers have not traditionally been tamable or even trainable in D&D. Fliers on the other hand have been since the earliest days of D&D called out as tamable or trainable. ..I've honestly never figured out what the counter measure is short of having an air force of your own. Yes and there are a lot of problems with livability with a dungeon if you are talking about housing humans on a long term basis. Ventilation, light, and flooding are potential problems that most proponents of dungeons tend to ignore. Plus, with a dungeon you have limited options in opposing sappers. The dwarves may have all these problems solved, but not necessarily in ways that humans can equal. Livability of a dungeon is probably even worse than a castle under siege - but maybe not a whole lot worse, and we are assuming the adoption of a castle alternative is driven by magic, so magic could presumably help out there. But dungeons also just...

Tuesday, 15th May, 2018

  • 08:15 PM - Derren quoted Celebrim in post Castles in a D&D/Fantasy setting
    While it certainly took a trebuchet a long time to reduce a wall, it took less time to reduce a wall with a steady barrage of stones than it took to starve out a castle and in the long run success was basically inevitable unlike other risky approaches like sapping. Trebuchet were used on many occasions to reduce the walls of a city or castle between their introduction in the 11th century and the ascendency of cannon in the 15th century. The most famous example I can think of is Edward the Longshanks used a large Trebuchet to destroy the gatehouse of Sterling Castle in 1304, an incident that basically marked the end the high walled castle as an effective deterrent as it proved that with a big enough engine, it was only a matter of time before you could reduce basically any castle. The Mongols also used Trebuchet to knock down the walls of Bagdad. I thought I had mentioned star forts at some point, but maybe that was a different thread. If you had enough stones then yes. Don't f...
  • 07:25 PM - Derren quoted Celebrim in post Castles in a D&D/Fantasy setting
    Well, first, by the late middle ages torsion and gravity based siege weapon technology had advanced to the point that in point of fact if you had enough money you could knock down the walls of pretty much anything with a trebuchet. It was just a matter of time. But for the most part, this was nothing really knew. The whole point of a castle was to delay a large force with a small force until you could muster forces to relieve it. Still by the late middle ages, the presence of powerful siege engines like trebuchets forced castle designers to begin building castles with counter-batteries of siege weapons of their own to destroy attacking trebuchets and latter cannons. As far as I know trebuchets were not really used to knock down walls, but to shoot over them to damage whatever they protected. They still had a rather low velocity and damage to the wall was rather low so it took a long time to destroy them. Cannons started out as "bigger is better" terror and siege weapons as they wer...

Wednesday, 9th May, 2018

  • 09:23 AM - ChaosGenerators quoted Celebrim in post Testing a Random Village Generator (and a City Generator)
    As a minor note, the populations you are generating would be small towns in my more medieval inspired game. Villages in my mind tend to be under 200 people..... ...towns of 200-2000 people pretty much always have at least one manufacturing activity per 1000 people or so. Examples of manufacturing activity include mining, quarrying, horse breeding, weaving, logging, basket-weaving, rope-making, brewing, distilling, cheese making, felting, pickling, smoking or drying meats, milling, forging, leather working, wainwrights, boat wrights, etc. Most manufacturing will distributed around a number of smaller work places, but occasionally it may be centered around a factory, temple, or monastery. Knowing the main economic interests tells me a ton about the town. Populations and what constitutes a village/town/city in different eras is a discussion that could take years. I've taken the population levels from the D&D 5E DMG but I see Pathfinder has a lower threshold for a village so I might redu...

Friday, 4th May, 2018

  • 07:33 PM - Saelorn quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    I can't imagine there is any productive conversation to have on this topic. I was kind of hoping for a discussion about personal preferences on what the end-goal of RPG evolution should be, but yeah, I don't think that's going to happen eleven pages into a thread that got off to such a rocky start :-/

Wednesday, 2nd May, 2018

  • 09:54 PM - Riley37 quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    Randomness isn't an aesthetic of play. Randomness can be a tool you use to uphold a desired aesthetic of play - in particular because the world seems to be random and people are very bad at creating the illusion of randomness without resorting to a random number generator - but the real purpose of an encounter table isn't in and of itself to be random. Randomness is just one tool to an end. You could do just as well with an encounter queue that wasn't random at all, but would be perceived as random by the players if it was long enough and varied enough. TLDR: There are methods, and there are goals, and it's useful to understand which is which. Furthermore, if I'm understanding Celebrim accurately (take with grain of salt), Celebrim sets goals *for the experience of the actual humans playing at his table*. Here's what would motivate *me* to flee a table in horror and outrage: "Well, the dice say zombies again, and I defer to the authority of the encounter table, which I myself wrote last month. So here's your fifth gorram zombie fight of the session. There's nothing to investigate, and no way to parley; roll for initiative." If Celebrim and I might ever agree on anything, I propose this: Servile obedience to one's previously-written tabular ordinances is not the highest possible moral accountability To paraphrase Lao Tzu, the tao which adheres rigidly to percentile roll encounter tables is not the true Tao. Simon, if you see Windows Vista as the acme of information technology and you want more of the same, then I hope you find what you want. However, when you're talking to people who mostly upgraded last year from Windows 8 to 10, or who have swapped to Ubuntu Linu...
  • 09:10 PM - Simon T. Vesper quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    Well, except in various blog posts he repeatedly claims to be playing D&D, and one of the posts you linked to as proof of the quality of his work contained a rant about how no one needed to play any other system but D&D because it was best if everyone was familiar with a system. So, whether he's running D&D seems to be a matter of debate. (Emphasis is mine.) He's biased. Clearly. How is this different from any other gamer out there? Well, except for those who repeat the mantra that the worth of a game is just "a matter of personal preference." If it helps, think of "D&D" as your preferred system. No system is good enough for your table. As the GM, you have to put in the effort to make your game work for your needs. Once we accept that, then we can talk about which ways are better than others, regarding how to advance your game.
  • 08:46 PM - Simon T. Vesper quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    *sigh* I recognize that there are tables that have that social contract, but it's a really dumb social contract that you usually find among tableswhere one or more players have been burned repeatedly by some jerk (or are themselves jerks) and instead of dealing with the problem as a social problem they blame the game, as if there was some sort of perfect game that could be run that didn't depend on the judgment and skill of the DM - just a process engine that churned out results based on dice rolls. Seriously, there isn't. Now sure, there is value to having a GM be a neutral arbiter, and I roll out in the open all the time - and pretty much every time a PC or NPCs success or failure is on the line. But 'fudging' a random encounter to avoid a repetitive result isn't even in the same class of moves as fudging a result to protect your precious plot or DM pet NPC, or whatever you as a GM are doing to rob your player of agency. You've conflated a method with a goal. I'm sorry, I thought I ...
  • 08:21 PM - Simon T. Vesper quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    Randomness isn't an aesthetic of play. Randomness is integral to the game because it takes the decision-making out of the GM's hands. When the GM rolls the dice, she must honor the result. If she doesn't, the players have every right to revolt and leave the game. Or is this thread going to devolve into a debate about whether "fudging" is cheating? Because if it is, I'm calling it right here. I don't you and I are going to see eye-to-eye on any topic unless we share certain core assumptions. I'm not convinced of that. You might have learned a bunch, and it's worthwhile learning about real world biomes and spreadsheets as things in and of themselves, but none of that necessarily makes you a more skillful GM and arms you with greater knowledge of how to run a game. Celebrim, you're going the same direction Ovinomancer went: you're trying to adopt a different definition. I don't disagree that a GM should seek to become more skilled at running her game, but that's a subset of the total possibilities when we're discussing "advanced" RPGs. Just as my example with encounter tables is a subset, and one that doesn't necessarily overlap with your focus on being "a more skillful GM." Again, the encounter tables are meant as an example of how the game might be advanced. Clearly, I did not achieve my objective, but that failure doesn't invalidate the attempt. Should we move on to other examples? It seems that we're struggling to make sense of this one...
  • 07:42 PM - Simon T. Vesper quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    The reason for that is that the real purpose of an encounter table is not to simulate a biome. The purpose of an encounter table is to inject a bit of randomness into the game. It applies the principle of the dice as sovereign to make a decision about the world-setting. How the table is structured, what options it offers, when the GM rolls on it ~ these are subject to change. If you try to do that, and you actually put your results into play, what you'll discover is that your encounter table is actually a non-encounter table, and that it won't take you very much wilderness exploration to realize that encounters with parrots or forest rats or low HD monkeys are generally non-encounters. You are correct. And had you read my post, you would have learned that I was knew this when I started this project: "In other words, that bear and those wolves see you coming. If you encounter them, it’s because they wanted you to. There’s nothing random about it." If your definition of advanced is ...

Tuesday, 1st May, 2018

  • 02:18 AM - Simon T. Vesper quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    I came up with the goal from 'The Tao of D&D', who in a recent article explained the purpose of revising dragons with the quote I used. Odd. I don't remember that. Respectfully, I disagree. The game is very recognizably AD&D and still draws heavily on AD&D material as source books and inspiration, for most of its terminology, it's classes and for the greater part of its rules. It does. And he's on record as stating that he won't reproduce the core rules from the books, for various reasons (not the least of which include copyright infringement). You are correct on two counts. The game described therein is actually a relatively small departure from AD&D, and really no different from AD&D than 1e game heavily drawing from a couple of dozen Dragon articles for optional and extended rules. This is clearly an inaccurate statement. He's written over 2,000 posts on his blog about the game, demonstrating the ability to deconstruct and analyze on a level I've encountered with but a hand...

Monday, 30th April, 2018

  • 11:09 PM - Simon T. Vesper quoted Celebrim in post Looking for Advanced Role-Playing Content
    I strongly recommend A Magical Medieval Society: Western Europe. An invaluable resourceful for that topic. It's available on DTRPG and other places. Found a copy, thank you. Only just started looking it over. Has quite a few tables and even some economic data; how accurate or useful any of it will be remains to be seen. For example, he wrote this: http://tao-dndwiki.blogspot.ca/2018/04/dragon.html Ok, fine I guess. I wrote this: http://www.enworld.org/forum/showthread.php?580811-Revised-and-rebalanced-dragons-for-1e-AD-amp-D Which of us actually met the goal of "a full-grown dragon should be the scariest, most powerful monster in the game" while at the same time creating something that was readable, playable, and matched well the spirit of the original AD&D rules? In short, I'd look around more widely. There is a lot of good content out there if you are looking for it, and in general of course every home brewer thinks his content is he best, because otherwise why would he use it? The...

Saturday, 28th April, 2018

  • 02:58 AM - Elfcrusher quoted Celebrim in post "Stranger Things" RPG
    Well it depends on what you mean by that. The main storyline of Star Wars revolves too much around the dreaded 'Chosen One' plotline that basically has no part in any RPG. But the Star Wars universe, and the setting itself, actually makes an excellent RPG setting and one you can tell a story that feels like Star Wars in. I give you things like the original Han Solo trilogy, and 'Rogue One' which was basically just a love letter to the Star Wars RPG and the extended universe it created. But if you have someone that wants to be Luke or Leia, you've got a problem, and basically leveled up Jedi have always sort of ruined the game. No I meant that if you have a Jedi with a lightsaber then everybody else is just a sidekick. So RPGs either nerf the heck out of Jedi or leave them out entirely. P.S. And I'm rather disappointed that nobody seemed to notice/like my fireball joke.
  • 02:20 AM - Elfcrusher quoted Celebrim in post "Stranger Things" RPG
    I don't at all disagree, but often the reason people want to play a particular game that is tied to a setting is that they want to recreate the feel of a particularly story. And quite often, people find that certain stories just don't lend themselves to RPG frameworks in that way. Like the entire Star Wars setting?

Friday, 27th April, 2018

  • 07:21 PM - Morrus quoted Celebrim in post "Stranger Things" RPG
    Stranger Things itself is not at all suited to an RPG treatment, for many of the reasons that the story is imploding on itself. Eleven simply doesn't need to belong to a party. She's the only Player Character in the story, and everyone else is ultimately just supporting cast. It's like having a Justice League formed of Wonder Woman and a half dozen ordinary school kids. It’s a genre not a specific story.

Thursday, 26th April, 2018

  • 02:29 PM - Lylandra quoted Celebrim in post Killing In The Name Of Advancement
    It seems to be coming down to whether humanoids in your game are inherently humans with bumps on their forehead or big ears or some such. Or to put it another way, do your PC live in a 'Star Wars' world where no matter how differently shaped the alien thing is, it's not actually alien at all but just a funny looking human? Because I think you are willing to concede that the xenomorphs from the movie 'Alien' are, if not easily classified as evil are at least easily classified as always enemies. So there is I think something that is a monster in your mind. You haven't banished the idea of implacable enemy entirely, because you always hedge that you are talking about 'humans'. Even the 'people' of my game are not human. For example, elves. Elves age 1/9th as slowly as humanity. They are inherently more individualistic and do not readily form close social associations or strong governments. Left to their own devices, elves would solve most conflicts with themselves by simply movi...

Tuesday, 24th April, 2018

  • 10:27 PM - Doug McCrae quoted Celebrim in post Killing In The Name Of Advancement
    Call of Cthulhu doesn't really expect any sane investigator to have any question in their mind regarding whether destroying mythos creatures is fundamentally good. "Poor devils! After all, they were not evil things of their kind. They were the men of another age and another order of being. Nature had played a hellish jest on them—as it will on any others that human madness, callousness, or cruelty may hereafter drag up in that hideously dead or sleeping polar waste—and this was their tragic homecoming. They had not been even savages—for what indeed had they done? That awful awakening in the cold of an unknown epoch—perhaps an attack by the furry, frantically barking quadrupeds, and a dazed defence against them and the equally frantic white simians with the queer wrappings and paraphernalia . . . poor Lake, poor Gedney . . . and poor Old Ones! Scientists to the last—what had they done that we would not have done in their place? God, what intelligence and persistence! What a facing of the ...
  • 06:51 PM - Flexor the Mighty! quoted Celebrim in post Killing In The Name Of Advancement
    I've always thought Call of Cthulhu's advancement system was one of the most elegant systems in gaming because it simulates so many intuitive ideas about how people get better at doing something. In terms of the tension between being heroic and killing things, I often find that at some level this idea can be taken too far the other way as well. A famous example would be Batman's relationship with the Joker, where the fact that Batman refuses to take the life of a psychotic murderer results repeatedly in the death and suffering of hundreds or thousands of people. A moral system adopted to explain a comic book code doesn't work very well when the tropes of the setting change, but at no point does the story deeply address the philosophy of pacifism and the challenges that adopting pacifism has for remaining moral. Occasionally the story lines might address the challenge departing from pacifism raises for the hero, but it almost never makes an honest assessment of the reverse. Thus, we have...
  • 03:49 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post Characters of different power levels in Zero to Hero type games
    I wonder what the math of this actually is. The math on damage, in Hero is linear, +1/5, what that represents, though is geometric 2^(n/5), so +5 STR, +1d6 when you punch someone, but you can lift twice as much... The biggest problem I'm having with the later editions zero to hero model that assumes replacement characters of the same level as the dead/retired character is conceptually figuring out where those replacement characters come from. Its not really much of issue, Raise Dead kicks in fairly early, and characters get more durable at higher levels, anyway. In 3e, replacement characters became an issue in one group I was in, because a player would get bored with his current build and want to swap. Or, a PC would die, be stripped of his gear, then the fully equipped (to suit the build) replacement would show up.


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