View Profile: Celebrim - D&D, Pathfinder, and RPGs at Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
Tab Content
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:04 AM
    Sort of. If I was redoing AD&D using what I've learned since 1e, there would be NWP's that would allow you to get thief abilities to some degree but they would still use their own separate rules for percentage chances of success because NWP's aren't very flexible and thief abilities need to be.
    8 replies | 157 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Saturday, 14th July, 2018, 06:02 PM
    Best: 1e: Dungeon Master's Guide, Runner Up: Ravenloft 2e: Complete Thieves Handbook, Runner Up: Return to the Tomb of Horrors 3e: Book of the Righteous, Runner Up: Player's Handbook Worst 1e: There are several good candidates, but my vote would be Q1: Queen of the Demonweb Pits, edging out Forest Oracle and Castle Greyhawk. 2e: There are probably too many to name, but FRQ1: Haunted...
    87 replies | 13361 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Thursday, 12th July, 2018, 03:29 PM
    I first encountered the concept of builds playing 1e AD&D in the late '80's. Builds weren't a thing in AD&D if and only if the group consensus on ability scores was to keep them fairly low. If the group used ability score generation methodologies that consistently generated above average ability scores, or if they tolerated cheating of some sort in ability score generation (rolling up...
    288 replies | 8335 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Thursday, 12th July, 2018, 04:48 AM
    No, you are quoting me out of context. No, the antecedent of the pronoun is logically and properly in the prior sentence, so that I said was, "I also don't think is nearly as relevant as some people think it is, as I don't think whether or not the only differences between the genders are cosmetic matters much." You can't just attach a pronoun willy-nilly to whatever you think it applies...
    16 replies | 487 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Wednesday, 11th July, 2018, 06:53 PM
    I'm going to stop there because since you've just outted yourself as having insufficient reading comprehension to understand what you read, that there is not much point in addressing the rest of your post either. I don't appreciate being misquoted in such a blatant fashion, but I in no fashion said "gender and sexuality presentation aren't nearly as relevant as some people think". Correct...
    16 replies | 487 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 10th July, 2018, 07:44 PM
    I'm inclined to think a large part of the OSR community is driven by this desire to fix up the old game based on the lessons learned since they first started playing it. For a while there I was greatly tempted to write Celebrim's 1e AD&D rules to make the game I wish I had been playing back in the day, but then I realized that the game would be just a cut down version of 3e with a bunch of...
    288 replies | 8335 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 10th July, 2018, 07:14 PM
    1982 here. 600+ pages of house rules, just of the ones that are written down. That said, I understand if rules smithing isn't everyone's thing. For me the real difference is how much of the rules are assumed to be player driven compared to how much the rules are DM driven, which is to say how much of the rules are flavor driven compared to mechanics driven. Goblins, hobgoblins, sidhe,...
    288 replies | 8335 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 10th July, 2018, 06:29 PM
    Obviously, there are still some die hard players that prefer 3e in some form. Add them all up, and I think they are probably the second largest block of D&D players. But I think it is also true that 5e one over a lot of 3e players, precisely because there was a block of 3e players that like 3e but found it way too fiddly and dense and wanted a streamlined more balanced 3e. I'm sort of...
    288 replies | 8335 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 10th July, 2018, 05:47 PM
    I don't believe this is true in real life. I also don't think it is nearly as relevant as some people think it is, as I don't think whether or not the only differences between the genders are cosmetic matters much. That is to say, whether or not the only differences between genders are cosmetic, men and women would still be equally valuable, deserve equal rights before the law, and deserve...
    16 replies | 487 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 10th July, 2018, 04:22 PM
    My impression is that both 2e and 4e came at a time when a large number of players felt the game needed to be fixed, and would generally welcome a new edition. These people had developed some theories about what was wrong and had expectations about what would be fixed by the new edition. However, both groups were largely surprised by the actual changes that came about. 1e players for example...
    288 replies | 8335 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Thursday, 5th July, 2018, 07:01 PM
    The irony is that I got banned out of innumerable threads for saying things that are in this article. In fact, to this day there are people who will claim that any statement that suggested 4e took design hints from World of Warcraft is blatant nonsense and such statements have ulterior motives. Honestly, I'm going to stop reading the article before it finishes, because it's bringing back such...
    288 replies | 8335 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Monday, 2nd July, 2018, 02:05 PM
    It's one of the mechanics that in theory kept Wizards from having a solution to every problem, which is as much to say it is one of the mechanics that kept wizards from being a Tier 1 class. When all these little annoyances and hindrances were dropped in 3e, the result was a very large gap in utility between casters and non-casters. That said, most of the time you aren't playing a Wizard...
    6 replies | 281 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Sunday, 1st July, 2018, 01:43 AM
    Corollary: Never challenge the GM's math when he's the only engineer at the table. (Said as a software engineer who likes statistics.)
    43 replies | 1243 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Friday, 29th June, 2018, 10:26 PM
    In general, I tend to find that the following to things are equivalent: a) Having the answer for every problem. b) Having a hammer so big that every problem becomes a nail. In WoD this was referred to as, "Potence/Celerity is every Discipline." Perfect balance is probably not attainable. What you should be going for is making sure that no build has an answer for every problem,...
    3 replies | 175 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Wednesday, 27th June, 2018, 04:25 PM
    This. I'm not a huge fan of innate flight for PCs. Tends to become a major factor in pretty much all adventure design -- which kinda sucks if the GM is walking in expecting relatively "normal" D&D. That said, I see nothing wrong with the player later saying, "I'd really like my wings back." Even if it screws up the current scenario, you can always plan for it down the road. They aren't getting...
    194 replies | 6299 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Wednesday, 27th June, 2018, 04:10 PM
    I had a conversation with someone who explained Enochian magic to me as, essentially, a way to use assembly to tweak the OS of the universe. I'm not sure how accurate of a depiction that is (I haven't found looking through the writings on the topic worth the effort -- too much absinthe or something), but your comment took me back to that conversation. Combining the two ideas, it doesn't take long...
    61 replies | 2336 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Wednesday, 27th June, 2018, 03:54 PM
    Newsletter, etc.
    61 replies | 2336 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Tuesday, 26th June, 2018, 04:21 PM
    Based on the Goliath lore, I think Bard makes a ton more sense than Wizard, especially if they're the keepers of the race's lore -- screams for Loremaster. So, a +1 charisma would drive things in that direction. Maybe some do go for Wizard, but it's more that they mistake knowledge for lore -- at least that's what their Bardic peers would say, which sounds like a reasonable sort of tribalism that...
    8 replies | 362 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 05:36 PM
    Aha. "It's the Dungeon & Dragons ride..."
    7 replies | 469 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Celebrim's Avatar
    Tuesday, 19th June, 2018, 05:33 AM
    Celebrim replied to Topography
    DMs should look at lots of pictures. Better yet, they should get up close with topography, and own the terrain so that they can bring places to life.
    2 replies | 221 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Mercule's Avatar
    Monday, 18th June, 2018, 12:12 AM
    High Elf 5 Wood Elf 16
    186 replies | 3880 view(s)
    0 XP
No More Results
About Celebrim

Basic Information

Age
44
About Celebrim
About Me:
A Stranger
Location:
Colombus, OH
Sex:
Male
Age Group:
Over 40
My Game Details

Details of games currently playing and games being sought.

Town:
Columbus
State:
Ohio
Country:
USA
Game Details:
Past 6 years running a homebrew campaign using a rules set evolved from 3e D&D.
More information:
Would very much like a one off in Dread or Fiasco from an experienced GM.

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
12,044
Posts Per Day
2.05
Last Post
thief abilities: should they have been NWPs? Yesterday 04:04 AM

Currency

Gold Pieces
40
General Information
Last Activity
Today 01:38 AM
Join Date
Thursday, 6th June, 2002
Product Reviews & Ratings
Reviews Written
0

7 Friends

  1. Brooding Paladin Brooding Paladin is offline

    Member

    Brooding Paladin
  2. Gentlegamer Gentlegamer is offline

    Member

    Gentlegamer
  3. haakon1 haakon1 is offline

    Member

    haakon1
  4. lordxaviar lordxaviar is offline

    Member

    lordxaviar
  5. Mark CMG Mark CMG is offline

    Member

    Mark CMG
  6. Mercule Mercule is offline

    Member

    Mercule
  7. Nonei Nonei is offline

    Member

    Nonei
Showing Friends 1 to 7 of 7
My Game Details
Town:
Columbus
State:
Ohio
Country:
USA
Game Details:
Past 6 years running a homebrew campaign using a rules set evolved from 3e D&D.
More information:
Would very much like a one off in Dread or Fiasco from an experienced GM.

Wednesday, 11th July, 2018


Tuesday, 10th July, 2018


Monday, 9th July, 2018


Friday, 6th July, 2018


Thursday, 5th July, 2018


Tuesday, 3rd July, 2018


Saturday, 30th June, 2018


Friday, 29th June, 2018


Thursday, 28th June, 2018


Wednesday, 27th June, 2018


Saturday, 23rd June, 2018


Friday, 22nd June, 2018


Tuesday, 19th June, 2018


Monday, 18th June, 2018


Page 1 of 12 1234567891011 ... LastLast

Friday, 20th April, 2018

  • 10:06 PM - Imaro mentioned Celebrim in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    ...e available beyond just foot, should I not find what I want here in Karnos and decide to try elsewhere? Are there any unusual local customs or modes of dress etc. that I need to be aware of? Etc., and I haven't even got to nation-region-world-astronomy questions yet. If much of this wasn't provided ahead of time (i.e. this part of the world wasn't built) then I - as would, I suspect, many players - would be asking most of these questions before I ever get around to declaring an action! Even if the questions don't directly inform my action declaration right now they'll inform my general approach later; and very little of this is stuff players should be expected to just make up on their own (and if they do then the GM has to be scribbling like a madman to record all of it in the interests of future consistency - why not just do this work beforehand when you've time to relax and think it through?) Just wanted to comment on this part of your post as it ties back to the point I think @Celebrim was making earlier in the thread... mainly that @pemerton doesn't play a strictly no myth game. He's stated that he uses pre-authored content including geography, deities, names, places, etc. I think the confusion arises because he then creates a distinction (which honestly I'm still not necessarily clear on where the line is actually drawn) between the things he pre-authors and world-building. However my understanding on no myth gaming (and I don't claim to be an expert) is that everything is created during play. What I feel like @pemerton has done is created a hybrid of the two styles while claiming it's no myth which is actually serving to confuse alot of the issues. Personally I'd love if someone could point to some actual play video or streaming of no myth gaming... the only one I can think of that uses no myth gaming is the episode on Tabletop where they play FATE... and the only thing they establish before play is the State the game takes place in. EDIT: Just to note the...
  • 05:59 PM - Ancalagon mentioned Celebrim in post Cultures in D&D/roleplaying: damned if you do, damned if you don't
    I wouldn't put it as strongly as you Celebrim , but I do thank you for the kind words. And you are correct that I am troubled by a set of "rules" that seem limiting and short sighted. If a goal is to be respectful of others (and this seems laudable), and the pursuit of that goal results in gaming/fiction/etc that pretends others don't exist... then we have failed to attain that goal.

Thursday, 5th April, 2018

  • 04:31 PM - Pauper mentioned Celebrim in post What SHOULD be the purpose of magic items in an RPG?
    Within the D&D universe (and the universes deliberately designed to be similar to it, such as Pathfinder's Golarion and Hackmaster's default universe, etcetera), magic exists as a tool -- it is defined, has specific effects, and requires explicit factors to be in place (class, level, components, etc.) before it can be used. In that sense, the 'why' of magic items in D&D is that they are tools that can be used by classes that don't otherwise get to use magic (healing potions are probably the ur-example here), or they are tools that can be used by classes that do get magic to either do magic they don't normally get to do or do so magic they do get to do more efficiently. I have a good deal of respect for Celebrim and his desire to make magic 'numenous', but as he points out, execution is much harder than conception, and D&D as a system has basically given up on making magic items 'special' save in a few specific instances where 'special' equates more with 'powerful' than with 'exotic'. The way most players approach magic items has adopted this pragmatism: if you ask a player what the purpose of a magic weapon is, his answer will likely be that it's to bypass the defenses of monsters resistant to non-magical weapons. This is a big reason why players complain when a DM is seen as 'stingy' with magic weapons -- players don't like to feel 'ineffective', even if the resistance to non-magic weapons is an intentional game design decision. Fifth edition has tried to reduce the importance of magic items, and has even taken steps to reduce the 'characters are magic item carrying platforms' concept of Third and Fourth edition D&D, but some players insist on collecting loads of magic items because th...

Wednesday, 4th April, 2018

  • 09:40 PM - Gradine mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    I'm not going to touch the broader debate except to mention for full disclosure that my sympathies lie a lot more with the individualist concerns of the grassroots movements. Perhaps you missed it, because my original post read "how is the academic definition useful?", but I realized my mistake and edited it to say "how is the academic definition useful here?" That's a fair point. I suppose I was just trying to cover my bases? To be honest, it seems like both of you are guilty of attributing nefarious motives to the other, and that's driving a lot of the frustration. Because, of course, once you see someone attributing nefarious motives to you, it's only natural to think they must have nefarious motives for doing so... To be perfectly honest, I have a significant amount of respect for Celebrim; he's intelligent and logical and I genuinely get the sense that his heart is honestly in the right place. He's in fact said as much about me as well (well, the heart-in-the-right place bit, anyway, I'm not sure what he thinks about my intellectual or logical capacities at this point :-P). I do have a tendency to let my heart get ahead of my head in discussions such as these, and get heated and say things which I kind of mean but which are unkind and unhelpful and usually apply to other people within the conversation, which tend to come out because I don't tend to reply to those individuals. Which is, I'll admit, pretty awful of me. These are all things I've been working on but clearly haven't mastered yet. And I can also see how I do try to shoehorn in other subjects that I really feel are really relevant at the time but in hindsight are maybe... relevant-adjacent, I'll say. Relevant from my perspective, sure, but probably way more of interest to me than anyone else in the thread. ...
  • 06:37 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    I'm not offended by worthless ideas. I'm also not in the minority here. Race is of absolutely no issue in the game as it stands. At least not to any appreciable number of people. Then how do you explain the change in Pathfinder? If it is of absolutely no issue, then, why is the #2 game changing it and why have a number of other RPG's changed it as well? And, frankly Maxperson, how is it possible to have a conversation with you when you absolutely refuse to acknowledge the other side's point? Whether you agree or not, fair enough. But, you're starting the conversation with "anyone who complains about this is such a tiny minority who shouldn't even be acknowledged". That makes it pretty hard to have any sort of conversation. And, as another point, I'd like to thank BryonD for illustrating my point. Having internalized his own interpretations to such a degree that he cannot even consider that those interpretations aren't actually part of the game. Compare that to Celebrim's elf example, that at least isn't counter-factual some of the time. In AD&D, since the rules were silent on the issue, any interpretation is equally valid. Of course, that means that the "nurture" interpretation is just as valid as the "nature" one. Now, after AD&D, the "nature" interpretation is flat out false since it actually contradicts what's written in the game. Like I said, I'm not terribly fussed abou this. Just bemused that people who spend this much time thinking about the game are so blind to their own internalizations.

Tuesday, 3rd April, 2018

  • 12:26 PM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    ...t. Oh, totally agree. What a DM does in his or her own game is none of my or anyone else's business. That's groovy. What bemuses me though is when people mistake their homebrew for what is actually in the game. They've done it a certain way for so long that they are no longer even aware that they have made changes and then start to argue that the way they've done it is somehow the "right" way of doing it, despite not actually being supported by the game itself. And, frankly, I agree that I wouldn't really want the game to be changed so much that race/origin/whateverdahellwefinallysettleon is a la carte. A baseline elf has elven weapon proficiencies. I'm groovy with that. That's the baseline. If you want to deviate from that (such as AngryDM has) then go right ahead. But, as an argument that somehow those proficiencies are innate to elves is actually not supported by the game. Granted, I'm banging the drum here on a single example, and I don't really mean to pick on Celebrim here actually. It was just something that stuck in my head. The argument is that race is the best term because race encapsulates elements that are not necessarily captured by, say, species because of the existence of magic. And, sure, darkvision (or whatever you want to call it) or trance, yup, that's pretty inherent in being an elf. But, that is still covered by terms like heritage or ancestry.
  • 09:29 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    What amuses and bemuses me the most in these types of topics is just how much people have internalized their own interpretations to the point where they can no longer distinguish their own idiosyncratic takes from what is actually stated in the game. For example, angryDM talks about the elf raised in a human city not being proficient in longswords and bows. Celebrim then claims that such proficiencies are the result of the nature of elves. Elves innately know how to use swords and bows. Only problem with that is that it's not true. It's certainly not true in 5e where, while high and wood elves get it, drow do not. They are all elves after all. If it was innate to being an elf, then everyone would have the same thing. Drow aren't proficient in any bows. Plus, it's specifically called out as Elf Weapon Training. Kinda says it right there in the title. In 3e, it's also called out as training - "Elves esteem the arts of swordplay and archery , so all elves are familiar with these weapons" (3e PHB p 16). 2e is silent on the issue - elves simply gain +1 to hit with bows and swords. There is no background given whatsoever. So, angryDM's point is pretty valid. For a good chunk of the game's history, elves do not gain any innate understanding of swords or bows. So, why does being an elf grant automatic proficiencies?

Thursday, 29th March, 2018

  • 01:09 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    Heh, it's nice to agree with Celebrim, just for the novelty of it. :D Yeah, I'm pretty solidly gamist, with a dose of narrativist in my play, so, yeah, Sim play is pretty much bottom of my list of priorities.

Wednesday, 28th March, 2018

  • 01:58 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    To be honest, I look at your list, Celebrim, and pretty much shrug and play on. These things just don't bother me. Web doesn't work because it needs two anchors? Ok, fair enough. It just doesn't work. 1/day non-magical powers? Fantastic. It's a game, it needs balance. No skin off my nose. Like I said, it just doesn't bother me. I simply cannot get up the energy to get bothered by this stuff anymore. I just want to play. If the game says X and X is fun? Good enough for me.

Monday, 26th March, 2018

  • 11:44 PM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    Celebrim - whereas I ran 3e/3.5 for quite a few years and rarely had any of the issues that seem to trouble you so much. We just didn't. The game ran best when we just stopped trying to fiddle with it. Again, it's all about different experiences. It has very little to do with stability and more to do with the fact that I have zero interest in learning another game, particularly someone's home-brew one. Again, I just don't. Note, RAW =/= you must accept every single book. Where is that part of RAW? RAW means that the rules that you use, you follow. Not, just because it's in a book somewhere, that we're not using, we still must abide by. That would be bizarre to reference a book that no one is using.
  • 01:51 PM - Mercule mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    Now, here is one area where we are in 100% agreement. I've largely come to the same conclusions that you have here. Yes, it's fun to bang out new mechanics, but, watching what people post has made me realize that many people are very bad at it. Like you say, they either set the numbers too high or too low and wind up with mechanics that just aren't all that good. I'll agree with this, too. I'd say I'm better than average, but that doesn't mean I always get it right the first time. Even the pros play test stuff. Heh, it's funny Celebrim, while I was writing my answer to Mercule, I did have you in mind when I mentioned 3 inch binders. :p And, I know, from your posts, that you spend incredible amounts of time on your game. Fantastic stuff. But, I also know myself well enough that I would be a very bad fit at your table. I just would. The constant rule changes would bug the heck out of me and I would wind up spending far more time whinging about this or that rule change than actually playing. :D I've gotten very used to playing in groups where RAW is generally the baseline we're all working from. From 3e onwards, the groups I played in and DM'd have generally tried to adhere to RAW. It works better for us. I'm not interested in playing amateur game designer nor am I interested, particularly in indulging anyone else's amateur game designer proclivities. I just want to play the game that we've agreed to sit down and play. I didn't have a 3" binder, but I did use one of those legal accordion folders and I'm p...
  • 02:35 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post Do You Use Your RPG Rules as Written?
    ...ad an idea about what they wanted to achieve the rules change that they were proposing rarely achieved that. Some where the equivalent of Monte Haul GMs that were handing out treasure in the form of broken rules, and others where the equivalent of death dungeon DMs that wanted to change the rules to "keep players in their place". Most of my posts from that era consisted of me trying to explain to some young DM why they probably shouldn't change the rules until they had a bit more experience and a very concrete reason why they wanted to change something and what they hoped to achieve by that change. Now, here is one area where we are in 100% agreement. I've largely come to the same conclusions that you have here. Yes, it's fun to bang out new mechanics, but, watching what people post has made me realize that many people are very bad at it. Like you say, they either set the numbers too high or too low and wind up with mechanics that just aren't all that good. Heh, it's funny Celebrim, while I was writing my answer to Mercule, I did have you in mind when I mentioned 3 inch binders. :p And, I know, from your posts, that you spend incredible amounts of time on your game. Fantastic stuff. But, I also know myself well enough that I would be a very bad fit at your table. I just would. The constant rule changes would bug the heck out of me and I would wind up spending far more time whinging about this or that rule change than actually playing. :D I've gotten very used to playing in groups where RAW is generally the baseline we're all working from. From 3e onwards, the groups I played in and DM'd have generally tried to adhere to RAW. It works better for us. I'm not interested in playing amateur game designer nor am I interested, particularly in indulging anyone else's amateur game designer proclivities. I just want to play the game that we've agreed to sit down and play.

Sunday, 25th March, 2018

  • 12:28 AM - pming mentioned Celebrim in post What Has Caused the OSR Revival?
    Hiya! @Celebrim, I think I get where you are coming from. From what I gather, you're arguing that having "stuff" in the rules, available to the players, helps fuel their imaginations and helps them reach for goals that are otherwise not mentioned/suggested. Is that a fair assessment? If it is...then I agree. I am a firm believer that a two or three sentence description of an "adventure" (for example) serves a much better purpose than a two or three page description of it. I guess the "less is more" paradigm is at the fore in this case. For example, I would rather have a paragraph in the PHB, under Magic-User say something like: "Magic-Users are always striving for more knowledge. Many will head down various intellectual pursuits such as astronomy, geography/geology, flora and fauna, biology, etc, trying to find new ways in which the great mysteries of magic can be understood, harnessed, and used for creating new spells, items, construction, and so forth". I would much rather have that (and I thi...

Tuesday, 13th March, 2018

  • 07:42 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy meets Medieval Europe
    Thomas B - don't let Celebrim worry you too much. I'd amend his claims to be closer to, "If you post this on En World with the pretensions that you are an expert and that any and all criticisms can be brushed away" then you might have problems. Otherwise, nobody is going to bother you in the slightest about this. We reap what we sow after all.

Thursday, 8th March, 2018

  • 10:54 PM - Grogg of the North mentioned Celebrim in post Poll: Gaseous form vampire is surrounded...is it "stuck"?
    The spell allows you to pass through "Mere cracks" so I would say yes. I will also agree with Celebrim that a creature that completely takes up its square would prevent movement, such as a gelatinous cube. Its movement would also be impeded if you could surrounded it with liquid (some sort of wall of water?) or if you had something like Wind Wall cast.

Wednesday, 7th March, 2018

  • 10:14 PM - doctorbadwolf mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy Meets Africa
    @Celebrim no one, anywhere, is saying that you can’t tell stories that are about a black woman if you’re a white guy. They’re saying that you do not have the relevant experience to tell a story that is about the specific experience of being a black woman in America, for instance, when you are a white dude. As for the idea that there are no struggles that aren’t common to “the human experience”...that is literally just blatant nonsense.
  • 11:05 AM - Aldarc mentioned Celebrim in post Your single favourite RPG book?
    Without question, Green Ronin's "The Book of the Righteous".This was my first thought too. IMHO, it was really the first book from the d20 3.X era that got religion right in terms of making a living pantheon and series of cults. Fundamentally it got something incredibly basic right, namely, "you do realize that people will actually want to worship/venerate these gods, right?" Honorable Mentions: mainly for being settings that influenced how I think about settings, and I respect a certain degree of coherency of the the first two listed settings in particular. * Eberron Campaign Setting Book * Numenera * Blue Rose (and the True20 book) Also, Fate Core (and Accelerated). I think that Fate Accelerated presented a more concise depiction of how Fate works, so it made a lot of it digestible for me when I was first looking into the system. I don't think that the writing is all that great, as Celebrim mentions, but once you get past the "pedestrian" writing, there are a lot of gems. I do think that some of the better explanations of the basic rules actually come from some of their other games (e.g., Atomic Robo, Young Centurions) or from 3rd party published settings (e.g., Jadepunk).
  • 12:41 AM - Hussar mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy Meets Africa
    ...a at all. If you got to be extra respectful to Africa but you can safely portray any non-English European ethnic group as a bunch of drunks that love to fight, guess which group is going to be your "ethnic color"? If some extra wheel starts spinning in your head when you see pictures of people with different skin color than you that causes you to treat that presentation differently, that ought to be a great big huge warning flag about something other than what you are looking at. That extra wheel doesn't help the industry become "more inclusive". It just is a big red flag to avoid any sort of controversy (sort of like what this thread might be with respect to publishing articles about Africa). This is total bull. There are any number of norse inspired modules that don't look like this. Heck, bullywugs? Seriously? And, we've even got historically (semi) accurate D&D supplements like the 2e Viking supplement which at least tries to be somewhat grounded in history. IOW, no, Celebrim, you are absolutely wrong here. Sure, there might be double standard modules like you describe, but, there are also ones that aren't. Which isn't true in D&D of anything African inspired. Which is the whole point.

Tuesday, 6th March, 2018

  • 03:43 PM - Doug McCrae mentioned Celebrim in post When Fantasy Meets Africa
    Celebrim Looking back on content I've created in the past I would say that I have fallen into the trap of associating black people with animals. For example in a superhero scenario that had about 40 characters there was one black NPC and I made her a Tigra type. On another occasion I used the wereleopard bit as the main antagonists when the PCs visited West Africa. In thinking about this and interrogating my choices I certainly don't think I'm being "deeply thoughtful and intellectual" but I do, quite strongly, feel that it's the right thing to do. Regarding treating fantasy Viking land in the same way, the big difference is that today in Western society people of Scandinavian heritage are not subject to discrimination due to beliefs about their lack of intelligence and propensity to violence that are rooted in 19th century scientific racism and people of sub-Saharan African heritage are. I don't see awareness of a double standard as itself being a double standard. If it is then it's a po...

Saturday, 3rd March, 2018



Page 1 of 12 1234567891011 ... LastLast
No results to display...

Thursday, 12th July, 2018

  • 08:15 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    If the group used ability score generation methodologies that consistently generated above average ability scores, or if they tolerated cheating of some sort in ability score generation, then builds were very much a thing in 1e. They were relatively straight forward... That's a build the way a dugout canoe is the Titanic. Primitive & much less elaborate, also unlikely to be sunk by an iceberg in the middle of the North Atlantic.
  • 02:19 PM - Umbran quoted Celebrim in post Gender and Sexuality in Golarion
    ... you've just outted yourself as having insufficient reading comprehension to understand what you read... And you've just outed yourself as being willing to insult fellow posters to "win" the argument. That's not acceptable. Please don't post in this thread again.

Wednesday, 11th July, 2018

  • 09:19 PM - Pauper quoted Celebrim in post Gender and Sexuality in Golarion
    I don't appreciate being misquoted in such a blatant fashion, but I in no fashion said "gender and sexuality presentation aren't nearly as relevant as some people think". I am quoting you verbatim. You said: "I also don't think it is nearly as relevant as some people think it is, as I don't think whether or not the only differences between the genders are cosmetic matters much." The follow-on phrase makes it clear that the 'it' you are referring to is the original poster's quote about the only game differences between genders being cosmetic. Expression within a game's mechanics, including whether or not those expressions are purely cosmetic, is a presentation of gender and sexuality -- if it wasn't, we wouldn't be having this discussion, as the entire point of 'inclusiveness' is to present expressions of gender and sexuality that people who don't fit the assumed social 'default' can identify and identify with. You appear to believe those presentations "aren't nearly as relevant as some...
  • 05:59 PM - Pauper quoted Celebrim in post Gender and Sexuality in Golarion
    To be perfectly honest, this seems like a false debate, ginned up for the purposes of demonstrating one's virtue, like one of those corner evangelists standing on a milk carton box, screaming at everyone, "Sinners go to hell. Repent now!", not because he is particularly concerned about the individuals he is screaming at, or their particular challenges, or out of any sort of real empathy for them as persons, but because he thinks that doing so is good for his own soul, and earns him brownie points. He's just engaged in a show of community service so that he can say he's a good person, and this comes out in the sort of things that they do and say (and how ineffectual they are at achieving their stated purpose). In the same way, I find these repeated debates have almost no bearing on actual gameplay, and they don't organically come up in play, and they aren't even something that anyone is usually interested in exploring when they sat down to play. I don't think that anyone is making nearly as ...

Tuesday, 10th July, 2018

  • 08:05 PM - Kobold Boots quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    By pushing 1st level characters to have more than 1 HD, 4e actually did introduce one major change in my house rules for the exact same reason - and one I've been very happy with. Granted, the change I made was conceptually very different than what 4e did, but it was certainly 4e inspired and had some of the same effects on the procedures of play (more rounds per combat, for example). Very cool. On my end I recently realized that the reason why 1e was so deadly was because it was intended to be played by players running more than one character and in most cases multiple - through the retainer rules. We never played it that way the first time around and tbh it's given me the perspective necessary to play that game with the balance intended. I'd never had a problem killing PCs with any version of the game, but this is likely going to dramatically affect how I concept games going forward, even if it doesn't change my style otherwise. KB
  • 07:26 PM - Kobold Boots quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    ... was front loaded. That is to say, the designers of the game had done a lot to make it easy to use their stuff, but in doing so they'd also increased the amount of work required to extend the system. Creating a new class for 4e was no light piece of work, and even creating a new interesting monster could be a daunting challenge owing to the complexity of the stat block and the need to make that monster mechanically interesting in 4e's tactical framework. By comparison, creating new content in 1e was owing to the lack of framework a simple exercise in natural language, where creating new content in 3e could be tedious but only for reasons of rote accounting. Now, if you weren't a rules smith, this probably was a welcome change. But if you came at the game as something you were going to customize to your taste and setting, imposing both new mechanics and new rules on your existing setting (and tying the two together strongly) was not something you wanted. Kindred spirit on this Celebrim as I've actually written/edited table drafts of the three main 1e rulebooks that had our campaign specific errata and Gary-isms removed or cleaned up. Granted that was a long time ago, and my English grades improved dramatically due to doing it. When I jumped into 4e, experience told me it was not to be touched or modified casually so I didn't do it and didn't convert my homebrew world to it. It annoyed me but now I see it as a blessing because walking away from it for a decade made me go back and critique things like I never would have otherwise. Rules smithing isn't everyone's cup of tea, but if you're going to critique a system because it doesn't have all the bells and whistles, as a DM I expect folks to go make some. 2c KB
  • 07:10 PM - houser2112 quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    Obviously, there are still some die hard players that prefer 3e in some form. Add them all up, and I think they are probably the second largest block of D&D players. Considering the vast majority of them probably switched to Pathfinder, and how Pathfinder is the main competitor to 5E for the mantle of "most popular edition of D&D right now", you're absolutely right. But I think it is also true that 5e one over a lot of 3e players, precisely because there was a block of 3e players that like 3e but found it way too fiddly and dense and wanted a streamlined more balanced 3e. Maybe it did. I can't dispute that, except to say it didn't "win over" this 3E diehard. :) 5e didn't enrage 3e adherents like 4e did. 3E adherents were enraged by 4E because they didn't have Pathfinder yet, and they were worried about losing support for their game. They have Pathfinder now, so they don't need D&D anymore. And it's system is not streamlined compared to 5e, it's actually /very/ similar, rig...
  • 06:17 PM - houser2112 quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    Again, I think 5e is successful because it's the game that 3e players expected from 4e I was with you until this. 5E is successful, cannot deny that, but to attribute that success to 3E players giving it their blessing couldn't be less true. People who like 3E like it for the density of its rules, and the depth and breadth of its character building options. 5E's rules system is extremely streamlined compared to 3E's, and 5E's character building options are downright anemic. 5E's success is in spite of 3E adherents, not because of it.

Saturday, 7th July, 2018

  • 09:27 AM - ccs quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    The irony is that I got banned out of innumerable threads for saying things that are in this article. In fact, to this day there are people who will claim that any statement that suggested 4e took design hints from World of Warcraft is blatant nonsense and such statements have ulterior motives. Honestly, I'm going to stop reading the article before it finishes, because it's bringing back such hard feelings about how I was treated here, that I find myself thinking of quitting EnWorld just reading it. The real irony is that when I started saying things like this, I wasn't by and large being critical of the new design. I was in fact actually happy with what I perceived as some of the goals of the design. It was only later that people took up my comments about how the design was taking cues from World of Warcraft as a sign that the new design was "too video gamey" or that the design was taking queues from how the MtG team had cleaned up the rules in 6e to make them more machine readable "t...

Friday, 6th July, 2018

  • 12:26 AM - Umbran quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    The irony is that I got banned out of innumerable threads for saying things that are in this article. All discussions take place within a context. It has been several years, and the context has changed significantly.

Thursday, 5th July, 2018

  • 10:17 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post The roots of 4e exposed?
    The irony is that I got banned out of innumerable threads for saying things that are in this article. In fact, to this day there are people who will claim that any statement that suggested 4e took design hints from World of Warcraft is blatant nonsense and such statements have ulterior motives. There's a difference between designing a TTRPG to be accessible to potential crossover fans from MMO RPGs (or CRPGs or CCGs, for that matter), and designing a 'tabletop MMO.' And, frankly, as MMOs /are/ still RPGs, even that's not as bad as the actual claims people had push back against: that 4e somehow "wasn't an RPG." But, it was ultimately a fool's errand, I suppose. The path just hasn't ever been mainstream > MMO > TT, it was never going to become 'all paths lead to D&D.' Probably there's a lot more TT > CRPG > MMO than the reverse. You discover TTRPGs, your group breaks up (or you never can find one in the first place), so you turn to a CRPG based on it, then MMOs when they come out. I...

Sunday, 1st July, 2018

  • 06:18 AM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post Gatekeeping, Edition Wars, and Fandom
    I'm ok with that. It's the trend of "If they don't like what I like then they are unpleasant..." that bothers me. Oh there are myriad perfectly agreeable persons who may not like what you like. You probably won't be aware of it, unless you ask them directly or it otherwise comes up - even then they'll likely just shrug at the difference of opinion and get on with their lives, leaving you to yours. OTOH, unpleasant people who dislike something you like will often make themselves known to you, by seeking out opportunities to tell you exactly how they feel and give you reasons, often very bad ones, why no one should like what you do. The actual Douchebags who don't like what you like are the ones who want to punish or at least mock you for liking it, if not take it away from you, stomp on it, criminalize it, and/or burn it - not necessarily in that order.
  • 12:52 AM - Garthanos quoted Celebrim in post Attercop Attercop from Taunting to - Come and Get it.
    You'd need a designer conversant in 4e, but I'm not. However, I can explain the general ideas involved and put them as close as I can in 4e terms. The feat basically gives you in 4e terms foptions on how to use a minor action during a round, or alternately if you want to power up the feat, one free action per turn can be used on the feat. That's more limited than the 3e version, but 4e has a tighter action economy and the change would be made up elsewhere. “Fight me, you son of a pig!”: Allows you to force a character to use its 'reaction' or 'opportunity' on you if you over come its Will defense (or Insight?). If it does, you have a significant advantage defending against the attack. In 3e, this can sometimes be significant because most things can only make 1 AoO a round, which means that your ally can now grapple the foe or quaff a potion or what not freely. I don't know what the limits on reactions or opportunities are in 4e, but presumably this would drain or limit them in a 4e vers...

Saturday, 30th June, 2018


Friday, 29th June, 2018

  • 11:59 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post Gatekeeping, Edition Wars, and Fandom
    I find that you ought to be careful dismissing other peoples ideas as 'utterly bogus', because almost certainly there are people that feel the same way regarding your ideas.... in retrospect, I think I took your post the wrong way.... ...nevermind.
  • 06:12 PM - Umbran quoted Celebrim in post Gatekeeping, Edition Wars, and Fandom
    My point is that we seem to be trying to apply the term "gatekeeping" to things that aren't gatekeeping, and I'm not sure what is the more destructive outcome of doing that, that it would excuse actual discriminatory gatekeeping based on stereotypes or that it would condemn what is actually necessary for the health of a community. That's why I broke out the differences between mentoring and gatekeeping, and mentioned the current colloquial usage of gatekeeping as well. Mentoring is good and healthy. The only gatekeeping we should be engaged in is (pardon my colorful language) "Are you a douchebag? Yes? Get out of my game / gaming room." By this broad usage you yourself are a gatekeeper for a community, in perhaps a more literal sense than we would use it for some dork at a convention saying girls weren't welcome at his table. Yet, I don't think either of us think your role as gatekeeper needs to be absolutely abolished as a thing inherently unhealthy. If we want to talk about mo...
  • 05:50 PM - epithet quoted Celebrim in post Gatekeeping, Edition Wars, and Fandom
    ... That to me strikes as decay of meaning, and if we can't avoid that, we should drop the metaphors and just talk plainly about the thing itself. The decay of meaning, and the use of metaphors to label and invalidate people who don't agree with you, seem to be the defining characteristics of modern discourse. To talk plainly about the thing itself would be to risk offending the sanctimonious or "triggering" the delicate, and we can't have that now, can we?
  • 05:44 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post Gatekeeping, Edition Wars, and Fandom
    No, I don't. I'm baffled, because you just defined "gate-keeping" in a manner I was pretty much happy with, and now you are contradicting your own definition. I'm putting "de-facto" in front of it for a reason. Gatekeeping is something people do, by 'de-facto' I mean an effect has been happening that is like the result of gatekeeping, but not necessarily because anyone's actively engaging in the activity. Coincidence rather than conspiracy. No, the edition war was not fought over preserving a supposed right or ability to engage in gatekeeping. That's ridiculous on its face and unsustainable in detail. Are you suggesting for example that Pazio broke from WotC because they wanted to preserve some ability to determine who could or could not enter the fandom or hobby, as opposed to having a legitmate business interest in producing a marketable product? Paizo acted for perfectly pragmatic business reasons, I assume. The people they were selling to, OTOH, clearly wanted to maintain a st...
  • 03:42 AM - Umbran quoted Celebrim in post Gatekeeping, Edition Wars, and Fandom
    See, that uses the term 'gatekeeping' so broadly that it ceases to have any real meaning I think, in this case, it is not simply too broad. It is inaccurate. Gatekeeping is an activity. D&D is not a thinking entity. It does not take actions. I agree there is such a thing as 'gatekeeping', albeit I don't necessarily agree that it is always destructive since any healthy community mentors prospective members into the community and explains to them the standards of that community. No. Mentoring and gatekeeping are not the same thing. A mentor says, "Oh, you want to try this? Well, I can help you if you'd like." A gatekeeper says, "Oh, you want to try this? Well, let me see if you are good enough," and then sends you away if you don't fit their criteria. The gatekeeper does not generally provide help after that. They only attempt to control access. And, in the modern parlance or social situations - a male geek trying to tell a woman cosplayer how she's not a "real ...

Thursday, 28th June, 2018

  • 11:48 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Celebrim in post Gatekeeping, Edition Wars, and Fandom
    See, that uses the term 'gatekeeping' so broadly that it ceases to have any real meaning Really? You can't see how having one primary entry point to a sub-culture from the mainstream, couldn't result in de-facto 'gatekeeping' effects? I agree there is such a thing as 'gatekeeping', albeit I don't necessarily agree that it is always destructive since any healthy community mentors prospective members into the community and explains to them the standards of that community. And I'd prefer - since the term has negative connotations - to only apply to the term to obviously destructive and discriminatory acts of gatekeeping, as opposed to ones that are at least non-discriminatory or potentially even positive and reasonable acts. While it's a reality not brought about by any intentional or overt acts (though, arguably, the edition war was fought in part to preserve it, so might qualify), it does seem to have a net discriminatory and, if not destructive, and least not constructive, effect. Had se...


0 Badges

Celebrim's Downloads

  Filename Total Downloads Rating Files Uploaded Last Updated

Most Recent Favorite Generators/Tables

View All Favorites