View Profile: Nevvur - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
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Sweeet. Ya, that's with 3 e's.
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Survivor the Good, the Bad, and the Fey- SPRITE WINS! Thursday, 19th July, 2018 03:19 AM

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Friday, 27th April, 2018

  • 02:48 PM - Oofta mentioned Nevvur in post Invisibility /stealth / hide with a rigid DM what can i do instead?
    ...amger actually a multiclassed ranger rogue with proficiency in perception stealth and even lockpicks. I will describe the situations a bit better: We are playing Oota (no Spoilers pls) One of the situations was a mass combat where the Party was had some cover by a room inside a stalagmit. The DM would not allow that i hide/stealth before taking a look out. He said the mobs would instantly notice me because they look at the entrance. So, since stealth is not equal to invisibility i can live with that ruling. But the in Initial postings Situation my char was not moving, hiding and invisible but several derro were swarming the place so he ruled one of them stumbled over me. Since when in such a Situation, i should be able to evade the contact, no? The derro were actively searching for the group or an attacker (and lateron i learned that they had alarms there notifying them of invisible People (but not dispelling the invisibility)) i should mention that for clarity. Based on Nevvur's response I'd say a conversation with the DM (even if it's email/text) is still definitely called for. This may just be some unique situations and it sounds like it may not be as bad as you think. Just keep in mind that a character with the criminal background can do most of what a rogue can do, but a rogue is still going to be better at being a rogue. In addition, while I prefer the looser feel of 5E it does mean there will be a lot of variation from table to table.
  • 12:05 PM - Coroc mentioned Nevvur in post Invisibility /stealth / hide with a rigid DM what can i do instead?
    Nevvur Wow most interesting, that the DM kept so close to the book, and somehow the Situation made it likely to use stealth or invisibility in that spot. Once the campaign is over i will read it up. Thanks to all replies, you were very helpful.

Saturday, 10th February, 2018

  • 05:41 PM - Redthistle mentioned Nevvur in post Character Backstories: Care to share?
    Nevvur. Delightful! It immediately called to mind Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, and that wizard's dealings with the Fey. Your take on the world of faerie is great entertainment. I love Nav's background, and the tale your DM and your group is weaving.

Tuesday, 6th February, 2018

  • 05:10 AM - 77IM mentioned Nevvur in post Swaying a Crowd of NPCs
    Nevvur: You're right about the undecided voters. If we assume that each one flips a coin just before the vote, then it's likely that the PCs' candidate can still win even if they haven't secured enough votes. That changes the math a little bit, but not by much, especially if you assume that most players won't stop schmoozing until they know they have enough votes. I imagine that failure to sway an undecided voter in a particular direction results in siding with the opposite camp. Committed voters are harder to sway and failure to sway means they can no longer be moved off their position. This will make resolution quick and decisive I think, plus it will shut down retries at a certain point. I love the idea of displaying this as a state machine for each NPC: Strongly Decided <---> Decided <---> Undecided If it were me, I would lay out a map of a Viking hall, and arrange the NPCs according to the state machine. Undecideds in the middle, Strongly Decideds in the corners (initially o...

Friday, 29th December, 2017

  • 12:22 AM - ArchfiendBobbie mentioned Nevvur in post Advice on revealing a secret identity.
    An expansion to the idea by @Nevvur below: Maybe the informant isn't a person. Maybe it's a specially-designed magical tome or similar item that has since gained sentience. But it wants free of its current owner, who is someone the Thieves Guild cannot afford to be caught crossing. The guild doesn't know about it in general, but one member does and if suitably compensated may be willing to part with information on doing the job he cannot.

Thursday, 14th December, 2017

  • 11:53 PM - CTurbo mentioned Nevvur in post My players are using my favorite classes against me lol
    I have some new info here. The beginning stat array will be a choice between 16, 15, 14, 12, 10, 8 or 15, 14, 14, 13, 12, 10 before racial bonuses. I let the group agree on a "reasonable" array and this is what they came up with. I don't have any problems with them. We almost always roll for stats. I'm more concerned about them being relatively equal moreso than them being a bit overpowered. If they're ALL overpowered, I just scale up the encounters. Both Pallys and the Tempest Cleric will be heavy armor Str builds, and the other three with be Dex based so I don't think stealth will be too big of an issue for them. I do like the moral dilemma opportunities and I will definitely be using that. Nevvur, my concerns are I feel like they won't have any glaring weaknesses. They're all going to have really high ACs(except for the Lore Bard), and be great at pretty much all saving throws. They can buff, control, and have much greater healing capacity than most parties.

Saturday, 18th November, 2017

  • 12:17 AM - Trit One-Ear mentioned Nevvur in post Help developing Drow plot
    Nevvur - You have it right, they're pretty much moving from behind the scenes, though they do have a small presence in the city - enough to put pressure on the higher ups and keep an eye on things. They have had the Archmage issue orders to seal the city to outsiders though, which has drawn some attention. I have a couple ideas. The Ritual could just produce similar results of the previous one. In reality the spell not only puts the dragon into a slumber but slowly drains it lifeforce and magical essence and that power is absorbed to a high priestess of drow who slowly gains power and turns into some kind of drow dragon hybrid. That means that more heros wait more powerfull The priestess becomes. Could make a choice of braking the ritual, which means the dragon wakes up (priestess may ar may not die due to this action) or slaying the dragon which means the priestess does not get more power but the city looses its amplification of magic. The Archmage could be dead and the one that looks like...

Wednesday, 15th November, 2017

  • 02:59 AM - pukunui mentioned Nevvur in post XGTE Errata
    Nevvur: I hyperlinked all the answers, which got rid of the green text. I hope that's OK. Jeremy says they've found (and fixed) three errors so far, and he's got his eye on a fourth (see below). I've added the other one (mind spike), plus my question about the Second Chance feat to the original post. I sure hope Healing Spirits gets an errata soon...Jeremy Crawford says he's keeping his eye on it and will change it if it becomes an actual problem in play (vs a theoretical one).

Tuesday, 14th November, 2017

  • 05:11 PM - OB1 mentioned Nevvur in post Where did the 6-8 encounter standard come from?
    I disagree with the conclusion. The reason that I use the 6-8 encounters is because there is a large amount of empirical evidence across a lot of tables that shows that this is the point the at-will, short-rest-recharge and long-rest-recharge classes balance against each other as well as common attrition tactics take a toll. Fewer, harder encounters favor some classes more and disfavor other. Number one common element in "5e is easy mode" threads is that they don't do 6-8 encounters. BTW, I'm not defending 6-8 encounters - I really enjoy 5e and it's by far my biggest complain about the system. I'm just saying that the reason the 6-8 gets talked about is because not only do they suggest it, but it holds up. Like as if they balanced against it. I agree this section is worded horribly and lends itself to confusion. Nevvur correctly quoted the DMG, but in your response you are already dropping the key words of CAN along with MEDIUM TO HARD. These are all very important factors in the guideline. When you look at the Adventure Day XP guidelines, you quickly see that what is missing from the 6-8 encounter assumption is that 3 Deadlies also give you the full adventuring day XP and equal the amount before a typical short rest. So you CAN get to the recommended maximum in 3 Deadly fights (with a short rest between each). Now, I know there is an argument that favors LR classes. But in actually play it doesn't. Sure, a Barbarian can theoretically rage in every encounter if you are going 3 Deadlies, but that assumes first that the Barbarian knows there is going to be exactly 3 encounters and that there would be a need or desire for the Barbarian to rage in each of 8 medium encounters. As for LR spellcasters, the fewer number of encounters per day is balanced by the fact that the number of combat ro...

Monday, 30th October, 2017

  • 06:04 AM - Wulffolk mentioned Nevvur in post Solution to ASI Problem
    Nevvur Thank you for your insights. I had considered that monsters might be more challenging if PC's don't have a 20 in their primary Ability, and I am fine with that. I would consider it more of a feature than a problem. You are definitely correct in your observation that this would have a greater impact on SAD Classes than it would on MAD Classes. I will give this some thought, but I am not sure that I would consider this a problem. Super specialization should mean some deficiency elsewhere.

Wednesday, 18th October, 2017

  • 04:38 PM - Wulffolk mentioned Nevvur in post E6 in 5e
    Someone else brought up the issue that, without dead levels, there's a lot going on in classes we'd like to see. Such as, if I was playing a wizard, I would like to see getting my hands on the level 10 subclass ability. Or an eldritch knight being able to do the teleport when spending an action surge. Those are fun, often iconic abilities. A paladin might want to get their subclass' aura. A monk or sorcerer want to increase their class points, while a battlemaster would want more martial dice, even if they don't get more sides on the dice. How are we going to address this? Yup, it would probably be a good thing to condense some of the interesting abilities into the dead levels. It would take work, but might be worth it. Once I start house-ruling things I tend to get out of control, practically re-writing the game. Maybe I will get around to re-writing an E6 version of 5e, or maybe I will be lazy and wait to see what Nevvur comes up with.

Sunday, 8th October, 2017

  • 11:43 PM - Harzel mentioned Nevvur in post Telegraph This
    Is there a way I can let the PCs know that bribery is on the table without just coming out and saying it? Isn't bribery always on the table? ;) More seriously, I think others have pretty much covered the ideas that occurred to me, but I will just add that they mainly stem from a general principle: Don't tell - show. Show the duergar being greedy; show the duergar ordering around some other animated objects; show the objects being deferential to dwarves. Of course, 'show' still means 'describe', but the point is to describe instances/examples of a general idea and then let the PCs infer the general idea. Of course, since you have limited opportunities to make the point, the examples often have to be quite blatant, but, as Nevvur noted, what is obvious to the DM is almost always not obvious to the players. The players may only get one or two examples of what their PCs would see dozens or hundreds of instances of.

Sunday, 1st October, 2017

  • 03:11 AM - Rhenny mentioned Nevvur in post Help and advice for 5e spellcaster
    I'll add to what Nevvur wrote too. Ultimately you should just play what you think would be fun for you. Don't worry about filling out the party. 5e is very flexible when it comes to party configuration and PC roles.

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Sunday, 1st July, 2018

  • 06:54 AM - Riley37 quoted Nevvur in post Would you marry a party member for +2 AC?
    Polymorph insect into humanoid. Marry humanoid. End polymorph. Enjoy buff. True Polymorph is a high requirement, and regular Polymorph could only turn the insect into a beast. Is it THAT hard to find a willing humanoid?

Wednesday, 27th June, 2018

  • 03:39 AM - Blue quoted Nevvur in post Damage cap thought experiment
    Big hits are kinda necessary to threaten PCs at high level play, so this sounds like a god feat if you set it at a static cap (unless the cap is pretty high, which in turn makes it completely useless at lower levels). The only way I can see making it functional is to have it scale with level. I'd probably go with half max HP if I were set on including such a feat at my table. Also depending on the cap amount, you may become invulnerable to instant death from damage that would equal or exceed your HP max. Just a few initial thoughts, I'm sure others will have more to add. Okay, let's try this from the top. It's not actually expected to work as a feat. I wouldn't want it in a game, it makes no narrative or game sense. Please don't try to fix it. But, it brings up interesting questions. It's a thought experiment to see what numbers make it a god feat and what merely makes it competitive. It's completely understood and discussed that it's no good at low levels, just like Heavy Armor Maste...

Friday, 15th June, 2018

  • 08:04 PM - Mouseferatu quoted Nevvur in post Orcus vs. Demogorgon
    It's fun to speculate on these sort of white room match-ups, but I wouldn't really call it a problem. The demon lords (along with literally every character in every RPG) should be more than the sum of their stat blocks The problem with looking purely at the start block of 5e monsters, is that they were created to simplify combat between players and to give them a chance to win, not display ALL of a monster's abilities. While these are both true, there are two problems: 1) This isn't something that a lot of newer players know, and 2) Demogorgon being at a disadvantage (let alone not being superior) in a straight stat block match-up is a change from previous editions and existing lore. So I understand why it bothers some people, even if it's surmountable with relative ease. Heck, it bothers me, even though I know I can easily adjust for it. I swear, 5E has a grudge against all my favorite archfiends. Demogorgon is nerfed, and not only is Anthraxus not even detailed but they'v...
  • 03:56 PM - amethal quoted Nevvur in post Your Suspension of Disbelief: SHATTERED!
    it's especially jarring when the character suddenly acquires a British accent. You'd be fine in our group, as our characters have British accents all the time.
  • 12:08 AM - ad_hoc quoted Nevvur in post Your Suspension of Disbelief: SHATTERED!
    It's specifically Monty Python references I have a problem with. Dumb jokes and sidetracking are uncommon in the games I run, as I do bi-weekly games and make a concerted effort to keep my players focused on the game to make the most of our time, but I'm not a heavy handed enforcer when it happens. I just find MP quips particularly grating and immersion breaking at the table, much as I love the troupe itself. For me it's like any other joke or reference. If it is rehearsed it isn't funny. If it comes up in the course of the game then it is fair game. If the peasants are being oppressed and someone shouts the line that's fair game. If the party is instructed to count to a certain number before doing something, again fair game. I do agree that Python references tend to be overused.

Thursday, 14th June, 2018

  • 09:26 PM - iserith quoted Nevvur in post Your Suspension of Disbelief: SHATTERED!
    It's specifically Monty Python references I have a problem with. Dumb jokes and sidetracking are uncommon in the games I run, as I do bi-weekly games and make a concerted effort to keep my players focused on the game to make the most of our time, but I'm not a heavy handed enforcer when it happens. I just find MP quips particularly grating and immersion breaking at the table, much as I love the troupe itself. I'm less concerned about "immersion breaking" with the MP jokes as much as the references themselves are just quite stale. Like get some new material already, nerds.
  • 06:15 PM - ad_hoc quoted Nevvur in post Your Suspension of Disbelief: SHATTERED!
    It mostly has to do with changing genres. We were playing D&D and all of a sudden we are on a spaceship that crashed 100s of years ago and it became the 'dungeon'. The DM was trying to describe the captain's deck of Star Trek. This one sounded good to me until the Star Trek part. Maybe I have just played too much Might & Magic. Monty Python quotes. Really, any attempt to score cheap laughs by quoting from real world sources gets under my skin, but it's especially jarring when the character suddenly acquires a British accent. Two different players have done this at the table, once where I was a player and once where I was the DM. I put a stop to it immediately in the latter case, but I was new to the group in the former, and didn't want to cause a stir. I didn't last long with that group, but then it had other troubles, besides. Do you have a problem with players making dumb jokes? At our table we make dumb jokes and get sidetracked all the time, but when it comes to actual ac...
  • 05:57 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Nevvur in post Your Suspension of Disbelief: SHATTERED!
    Have you ever been in a game that broke your suspension of disbelief? Meh, not really - my suspension of disbelief must engineered like the Golden Gate Bridge or something. What did it? In D&D, the closest anything ever came to doing so was psionics. Though Vancian 'memorization' was pretty awful, at first, too, as were hps & the lengthy one-minute round until I read the relevant treatises in the 1e DMG (I was still impressionable, I guess). Monty Python quotes. Really, any attempt to score cheap laughs by quoting from real world sources gets under my skin, but it's especially jarring when the character suddenly acquires a British accent. Two different players have done this at the table..Only two? Back in the day Monty Python & the Holy Grail got quoted by everyone, at every game I ever attended, incessantly. I knew every joke from that movie before I ever saw it. Even obscure out-of-context ones like, "...that's an offensive weapon, that is..."

Thursday, 7th June, 2018

  • 08:00 PM - BookBarbarian quoted Nevvur in post One of my players wants to play a kid wizard like Harry Potter. Should i allow it?
    I have a hard time buying into all these arguments that it's cool having young adventurers because you were considered an adult at age 13 (or whatever) in medieval times. Modern social mores are pretty much the norm in every game I've run and played in, and for most of the games I've read about when GMs/players post about their campaigns here. This is particularly evident in the treatment of women, who enjoy much greater equity with men than their historic counterparts. It's also apparent in player expectations of justice systems. Nothing wrong with mixing which social mores apply to your setting, modern and historic, but I feel like if a GM is going to green light child adventurers based on this reasoning, it behooves them to review others. The Historical argument doesn't hold much water for me either. For me the fact that child or at least teen adventurers are prevalent in the fiction I my games are trying to capture the feel of is enough to just say, sure sounds fun!

Wednesday, 6th June, 2018

  • 11:38 PM - iserith quoted Nevvur in post One of my players wants to play a kid wizard like Harry Potter. Should i allow it?
    I have a hard time buying into all these arguments that it's cool having young adventurers because you were considered an adult at age 13 (or whatever) in medieval times. Modern social mores are pretty much the norm in every game I've run and played in, and for most of the games I've read about when GMs/players post about their campaigns here. This is particularly evident in the treatment of women, who enjoy much greater equity with men than their historic counterparts. It's also apparent in player expectations of justice systems. Nothing wrong with mixing which social mores apply to your setting, modern and historic, but I feel like if a GM is going to green light child adventurers based on this reasoning, it behooves them to review others. I don't think it's a great argument either. It strikes me as thinking it's cool to have a Harry Potter-esque adventurer and then coming up with a reason after the fact and a somewhat weak one at that. No reason is needed in my view other than the pl...

Wednesday, 23rd May, 2018

  • 09:29 AM - Harzel quoted Nevvur in post Hi, I'm Andrea
    Strongly disagree about watching Critical Role. It's entertainment, not education. In the words of Stu Venable, "Watching Critical Role to learn how to play role playing games is like watching porn to learn how to have sex." I know nothing of Stu except this quote you have given, but absent any context that strikes me as an assertion born of either envy or ignorance. In particular, the analogy to porn is inflammatory without having any substance. It's pure put-down with no insight. That said, it is true that for a new DM (or player) viewing CR probably should come with the observation that the cast are professional actors, and the way they have fun with D&D is much more heavily slanted toward RP (in the sense of acting out characterizations) than it would be for the average D&D group. In particular, if you took it as some sort of ideal to be attained (instead of an example to be considered), it would set up unrealistic expectations of the players on the part of the DM, and vice versa in ...
  • 08:35 AM - CapnZapp quoted Nevvur in post Hi, I'm Andrea
    Strongly disagree about watching Critical Role. It's entertainment, not education. In the words of Stu Venable, "Watching Critical Role to learn how to play role playing games is like watching porn to learn how to have sex." Agreed. Watching professional high-confidence extrovert gamers-cum-actors act out D&D sessions with high production values is great if you want to make yourself insecure about your own DM-ing abilities. Even worse, using that show to instill impossibly high expectations into your players. A far better approach is to collect three or four (not more, not less) friends and just start playing. Start with something small and simple - even if you later find Lost Mines of Phandelver, say, is not sophisticated enough for your gaming tastes, it should work well at giving you a taste of what DM:ing entails. Don't worry about production values. All you need is pen, paper, dice and your collective imagination. Everything else can come later. :)
  • 07:54 AM - rgoodbb quoted Nevvur in post Hi, I'm Andrea
    Strongly disagree about watching Critical Role. It's entertainment, not education. In the words of Stu Venable, "Watching Critical Role to learn how to play role playing games is like watching porn to learn how to have sex." Watching Critical Role will not let you get all the rules exactly, as they do one or two things differently (as do a lot of DM's) Watching Critical Role will hopefully inspire you as a DM to better describe and enrich your world through dramatic scenes and memorable NPC's and good inter-party relationships and it should show you how a DM can go with players ideas and say the word Yes, to players whenever they can. It should also show that a story that is built upon by the DM and the players is rewarding to all around the table. It can be also be a lot of fun to watch as well. I suggest you watch it and make up your own mind. If it does nothing else, then it provides great weekly entertainment for a lot of folk.

Tuesday, 22nd May, 2018

  • 03:19 AM - FrogReaver quoted Nevvur in post Game Theory. CR and 5E Encounter System.
    Can we stop with the "breaks the game" crap already? I've run games with and without powergaming madness, including the aforementioned feats, and none of my groups broke the game. It's hyperbolic nonsense that I really wish would go away. Give people a bit of credit. Saying breaks the game means that the game recommendations for challenging a party are broken, not that a DM with infinite resources cannot ever something to challenge whatever party he desires. Maybe you shouldn't take their hyperbolic nonsense so literally?

Thursday, 17th May, 2018

  • 11:21 AM - Doc_Klueless quoted Nevvur in post Darkvision: Don't forget the Disadvantage & limitations!
    Disadvantage on Perception checks is still way better than being blind, but it does give a reason to carry a light source regardless, which means normal people won't feel quite so left out. Having disadvantage on perception checks in darkness isn't a drawback compared to automatically missing visual cues because you're blind in the dark. Still beats automatically failing all stealth attempts and being noticed even around corners or from miles away Right. Which is why I wrote: "I think the main problem is that by ignoring this, darkvision kicks the crap outta human sight even more than it should." Still beats normal vision, but not nearly as much as it does if you forget the whole Disadvantage on Wisdom (perception) sight rolls. Dim light does not reduce passive perception. You can still hear. So even if you might not see the threat, you might still notice it. Now it is possible that you are not surpised but the enemy is still invisible. So if your pp is 14 and the enemy roll...

Monday, 14th May, 2018

  • 08:39 AM - Zethnos quoted Nevvur in post How do I justify a Lizardfolk Cleric in lore and RP?
    ... do it. Now I'm kind of thinking: The character in some way has observed one or more cleric(s) performing their magic. It brought great pleasure in way of comfort, food, & healing. It also aided warriors in combat making them stronger, survive longer, and face greater threats. The character thought about what he has witnessed and decided to seek out a temple to become a cleric in search of pleasure and greater resources for survival. They decide to take the LF in and teach him to be a cleric because since they are typically fierce warriors, they could use him to spread the word of the strength and name of their temple and god(s). That would also give me a "call to adventure" the temple sends him out to find a party and take on adventures to advance as a cleric and spread the word. A reason to stay with the party would be that he gets intrigued by the party members and wants to understand more about them and use them to help him become more powerful of a cleric. As you mentioned Nevvure, I guess I really could break the restrictions a bit like Drizzt. I could over time change his motives to wanting to bring other creatures pleasure and safety (also fitting in with the description of treating humans like hatch-lings), since his people seek it for themselves. I'll have to play around with the idea though :P Again thanks guys! It's been a big help.

Sunday, 13th May, 2018

  • 12:31 PM - 5ekyu quoted Nevvur in post Describing damage resistance
    I consider it fair play and good DMing to describe damage resistance after a PC hits a creature resistant to the attack's damage type. Lately I've been feeling like my descriptions are kinda lame, mostly after hearing similar statements from the mouth of a talented DM (Matt Mercer on Critical Role). "You punch the creature, but you don't feel like the punch goes all the way through," or, "The attack doesn't do as much damage as you expected." It feels vague and flat, but I have trouble imagining more descriptive reactions to resisted damage types. Two complicating factors... First, it doesn't make sense to use the same description for different creatures. For instance, a Will-o-Wisp resists weapon damage differently than a Grick. Second, PCs don't necessarily have a reference point to realize their attacks are less effective for creatures they've never fought before. Regardless, the pragmatist in me thinks I might as well just say, "You sense it has resistance to that type of damage," rath...

Saturday, 12th May, 2018

  • 06:42 PM - Satyrn quoted Nevvur in post Describing damage resistance
    How about you? Assuming you telegraph damage resistance, what are some of the more immersive and sensible descriptions you've used for various damage types? If you don't communicate resistance, circumstantially or generally, why? I've actually found the most sensible description for me is "The damage is halved by the monster's resistance." I don't even skirt around it, I tell them outright. As you say, the players can picture it for themselves, plus they don't have to wait for me to come up with some clever description, or fumble over a terrible one.

Friday, 11th May, 2018

  • 11:55 PM - smbakeresq quoted Nevvur in post How strict are you with vision and illumination rules?
    A thought about moonlight occurred to me as I skimmed the thread again. Everyone's assuming Earth levels of moonlight. That isn't necessarily wrong, but any ruling could be explained as a brighter/larger or dimmer/smaller moon than we are accustomed to. Call it a setting property, not a house rule, and you're good to go. Read Nightfall by Asimov, itís about a world in a system with 6 suns so darkness is unknown except for once every 2000 years.
  • 05:35 AM - Ancalagon quoted Nevvur in post Is this railroading?
    edit: most importantly, if the players come up with a solution that blows my well laid plans to smithereens, but is perfectly clever and reasonable, I need to be prepared to throw all my preparation out the door. Refusal to do so is the biggest and baddest manifestation of railroading IMO. YES! This has happened to me more than one and... well if the players stump be, bravo, good for them! I had a PC interrupt a huge battle with *cure disease*... and after giving it some thought, I realized that yup, that would totally do it, fight over!


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