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About Riley37

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About Riley37
Introduction:
D&D 5E player, decades of other RPGing
About Me:
I'm Riley. I live in California, USA, near San Francisco. I first played TRPG with AD&D in the 1980s. I've tried The Fantasy Trip, GURPs, Hero System, Shadowrun, World of Darkness, and a few others. I prefer point-based, skill-based systems, rather than classes and levels; but class/level can work fine. Game systems are tools, to be used well or poorly. The user's skill matters more than the tool's quality.
Currently, I'm in a D&D 5E group, which has gathered via a DM running Adventurer's League games at a local store, and drop-in players. We're having fun, and the rules aren't cumbersome; deciding what a character does, and resolving whether they succeed, has, for the most part, happened relatively quickly.
I also enjoy board games from chess to Settlers to to OGRE to Snit's Revenge, and the MMO "Kingdom of Loathing."
Location:
San Mateo, California, USA
Sex:
Male
Age Group:
Over 40
My Game Details

Details of games currently playing and games being sought.

Town:
San Mateo
State:
California
Country:
USA
My Character:
What, only one of them?
Currently running 5E CG half-elf bard, College of Lore.

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Arguments and assumptions against multi classing Thursday, 30th August, 2018 08:19 AM

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Town:
San Mateo
State:
California
Country:
USA
My Character:
What, only one of them?
Currently running 5E CG half-elf bard, College of Lore.
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Friday, 15th June, 2018

  • 01:36 PM - Coroc mentioned Riley37 in post Your Suspension of Disbelief: SHATTERED!
    Riley37 If a cultural and technological Level on which a class is based upon is conforming to you as being a stereotype ok, let us take the example of Conan. The first thing when confronting those shiny Knights from 1000 years in the future is surely not the Axe which blade is to small for his taste, but their shiny perfect Fitting armor as soon as he downs one who is about his size. Oh wait he is barred by class Definition from wearing it because of cultural Level ... ah wrong because of stereotype of course. And do not argue he got unarmed defense and can move faster and yadda: You can even swim in full plate armor and you are less likely to drown than doing so with hide and kilt and layered linen which soaks with water. Besides that you can high jump, far jump climb ladders, run alsmost as fast as without armor with sophisticated plate. And what is the weapon of choice to Counter plate? A halberd. There we got it. Is it stereotype again? No it is technological and cultural Level and...
  • 11:10 AM - Coroc mentioned Riley37 in post Your Suspension of Disbelief: SHATTERED!
    Riley37 "For me, the distinction between "finesse" and non-finesse melee weapons shatters suspension far more than dual-wielding. Dagger, sword, spear, club, axe - with any of those, it's good to strike strongly AND good to strike accurately AND good to outpace (and anticipate) the opponent's moves and countermoves" That is of course true, but would require a different Approach e.g. dex to hit and str for damage in most cases (except crossbow that is). But were you never bothered by a halfling wielding a halberd? Imagine a size of a kid Person with a 6ft melee weapon. That would be liek a human using an 12-18 ft pike for (Close) melee, It simply would not work due to momentum and leverage so this is (b.s.)^2 and gets houseruled in my campaigns. I must admit that my dwarves tend to be 4ft rather than the 5ft dwarves of these days. My houseruling tends to be Floating, e.g. one of my Players wanted to Play a dwarf barbarian with a halberd. I said to him "Ahm a dwarf and barbarian is com...

Friday, 18th May, 2018

  • 08:37 PM - lowkey13 mentioned Riley37 in post Harassment Policies: New Allegations Show More Work To Be Done
    Riley37 Okay, googled it. People suck. I did like this comment I found while researching the topic- "the only reason these topics are divisive is because a loud minority of terrible people support other terrible people." heh
  • 07:56 PM - lowkey13 mentioned Riley37 in post Harassment Policies: New Allegations Show More Work To Be Done
    Riley37 I read your whole post a few times, and I am still not sure what the issue is (was?) that you are referring to. If I am understanding you correctly, this guy Correia was uninvited as a guest of honor from the convention (Origins), and then people started harassing the convention organizers for uninviting him? Is that right?

Thursday, 10th May, 2018

  • 07:34 PM - lowkey13 mentioned Riley37 in post Harassment Policies: New Allegations Show More Work To Be Done
    Riley37 I appreciate you taking the time to write the long, and thoughtful, response. I would like to articulate my perspective- These internet conversations are, for the most part, meaningless. What matters is what you do in your real life to help achieve the type of change that makes society better. That isn't something that everyone is equally able to accomplish, but even practicing kindness on an individual level can help. I am comfortable with my contributions to help people in real life, as I am sure you are. So why bother? Well, for the most part, on this website, I don't. I prefer to get away from real life and discuss things of pure joy; the shared love of our hobby. That is why I am appreciative of this website's "no politics, no religion" rules. And, just as importantly, good moderation and a good community. Sure, we have some trolls, but compared to almost every other website out there, the combination of community and moderation makes this a better place to talk. So as...

Tuesday, 10th April, 2018

  • 10:03 AM - pemerton mentioned Riley37 in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    ..., heredity, culture, capabilities and (elements of) worth. This is not a use of race that falls "outside" of racist theories; it's a use that emulates those theories. It doesn't mitigate the emulation to say "But in the gameworld all that's true, so the use is accurate". That's just doubling down on the emulation! the problematic elements pemerton was identifying were not language based. Change the word "race" in Howard's or Gygax's writing, and it doesn't get any better.But take away the word "race" and you at least loose the conceptual pressure towards the current features that I identified. As I posted upthread, there are ways of loosening this connection between "species" and capability, and also of loosening the connection between "species" and culture. I think changing the way the rulebooks talk about "race" might be one part of such a loosening. While the language of "race" is retained, I don't think it is going to happen. EDIT: I think this is an instance of Riley37's point about necessity and sufficiency.

Saturday, 7th April, 2018

  • 12:40 PM - pemerton mentioned Riley37 in post Do We Still Need "Race" in D&D?
    There is absolutely no evidence that the use of the word race in the way it is used keeps anyone away.Two things. First, I thought that Dannyalcatraz posted to the contrary upthread, namely, that he had reason to believe there are some Black potential gamers (not him) who are turned off by use of the word "race". (Or did he just say that they don't like it but put up with it?) Second, "keeping anyone away" is not, in my view, the test for what is desirable in a cultural artefact. Riley37 had a really good post about this not far upthread: the racism in LotR doesn't keep me away, but the novel might be even better without it (I'm not sure you can get rid of all of it and still have it be the story that it is, but the bit about the "half-goblin" Southerner clearly is not fundamental to the story being what it is). As I've already mentioned in this thread, few of my family and friends are RPGers. I don't think they would play FRPGs if the treatment of "race" was changed; and if they wanted to play, I don't think the treatment of "race" would stop them. Nevertheless, I would prefer a game that doesn't require me to make apologies or acknowledge problematic elements to family and friends. And that I was more comfortable sharing with my children.

Monday, 27th April, 2015

  • 07:37 PM - redrick mentioned Riley37 in post Non-Lethal Damage in 5E?
    Yeah, definitely have to declare before-hand. That being said, getting rid of "non-lethal damage" as a concept is a welcome simplification for me. Players still have to be in melee for it to work, which is something of a limitation, particularly for groups that rely heavily on ranged and spell attacks for a lot of their damage. Personally, I'm all for encouraging player characters to leave opponents alive for questioning, etc. I don't have any reason to discourage or penalize a little extra role-play. That being said, if it became a problem, adding a penalty like what Riley37 suggests might be the way to go. I also bring in PC-style death rules for NPCs whenever it makes sense. It's easily done, and since most opponents aren't walking around with cure wounds spells, it only ever works to the advantage of PCs. (For instance, if PCs want to question an opponent, I'd let them tell me this before making a ranged attack. Then I'd say, "the goblin is bleeding out. You have 3 rounds to stabilize him before he dies.")

Wednesday, 22nd April, 2015

  • 04:01 PM - steeldragons mentioned Riley37 in post LE Paladin in Adventurer's League
    Just, as a point of order, Riley37 , are you the DM of this Adventure League game? Otherwise...or even so, if you are...I am curious/confused as to why you would "anticipate a discussion" about the PC's oath when the time comes. This is not your PC, right? As a player or DM, other than basic notification if the player felt like sharing, I don't see how/why that would be something I would ever "anticipate" or have any expectation of, at all, let alone discussion about...Particularly in an open-to-anyone type AL game. What the other player is doing with their character is...not my business or place to say. That's for the respective player to decide and implement in the game world in a way that reveals it to my character/the rest of the party. So...yeah...why do you anticipate/expect a discussion on what oath this character is going to take?

Thursday, 1st January, 2015

  • 05:24 AM - pukunui mentioned Riley37 in post roleplaying the Oath of the Ancients
    Riley37: Good stuff. Thanks! EDIT: BTW, I feel I should admit that I was getting a surfer dude/hippy vibe more from a paraphrasing of the oath's tenets that I found on the Giant in the Playground forums rather than the tenets themselves. Here it is if you're interested: 1. Be kind yo, and fight against sadness 2. Find places where people are cool dudes and shield them from the bogus ones 3. Keep real chill and awesome, can't spread coolness without being cool yourself, dude 4. inspire others to be real cool and chill and thus spread the coolness In other words: "Be excellent to each other."

Wednesday, 24th December, 2014

  • 12:05 AM - Tormyr mentioned Riley37 in post BREAKING 5th Edition!
    Falsehood dressed as truth, and you know why. I've gotten more such positive feedback than you have, so there's that. :erm: You have the same amount of XP, but Riley37 has done it in half the posts and less than 1 month.

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Thursday, 23rd August, 2018

  • 08:43 PM - Magean quoted Riley37 in post So my players inadvertently entered the local gang's den...
    Thanks guys for your answers. I played in a Shadowrun story, in which the PCs came across the tail end of a firefight between two strong groups. We finished off the survivors, and found a LOT of useful items. It was the GM's way of giving us an immediate power boost, but with ensuing complications. What if the PCs arrive just in time to break a deadlock and tip the victory towards either of two sides? For example, they can either cover the retreat of the gang's boss and treasurer (who hire them on the spot), or they can cut off that retreat and hope for gratitude from the pursuers? Is the Watch *all* working for the conspiracy, or just a few? Perhaps a Watch leader hires them as deniable mercenaries, and then they stumble across evidence that he's working at cross purposes to the Watch commander. I like the idea of PCs as tie-breakers; forcing PCs to take sides in faction-heavy adventures is quite the staple dilemma. The watch isn't entirely corrupt; in fact it's mostly not cor...

Tuesday, 21st August, 2018

  • 08:53 PM - Thomas Bowman quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Epedocles, a pre-Socratic philosopher, taught that that souls can be reincarnated between humans, animals and even plants; he advocated vegetarianism, since animals are souls punished in rebirth; wise people's souls, free from the cycle of reincarnations, are able to rest in happiness for eternity. That's compatible with Buddhism. You've seen pictures of Greek statues with no arms, right? And Hindu statues with lots of arms? Obvious explanation: Alexander's expedition to India was well-armed. In the time you spent writing this, you could have looked up an intro to Buddhism. At least then you'd know what you were disagreeing with. Everyone's starting point on most topics is ignorance, but you don't have to wallow in ignorance. I'm not particularly interested in real world present day religions. They tend to complicate matters. The old greek gods make great comic book characters however as no one or very few people take them seriously.

Friday, 17th August, 2018

  • 11:01 PM - Gradine quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    or on whether Trans-Bering qualifies as a sibboleth Interesting to note, but I know indigenous Americans who do not believe their ancestors crossed the Bering land-bridge but were instead always indigenous to the Americas.
  • 10:16 PM - dragoner quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    I was agreeing with Dragoner on whether the title of the OP could be considered political, so perhaps Dragoner has a counter-point (or counter-counter-point). If it's worth pursuing. I agree with you as well. There is a subtle nuance to the labels, and in my experience, "Indian" is falling away from general usage, because Indians are from the Republic of India, the term was always a misnomer. I agree about denying genocide as well, though being partially of the Jewish persuasion, denial conversations strike me as unsettling at best, if not tasteless, and I didn't want to automatically Godwin the thread. I also agree the thread should just die, that's why I didn't reply, hoping the thread would fall down into oblivion.

Thursday, 16th August, 2018

  • 09:13 PM - TheCosmicKid quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    True. I'm not *insisting*; I'm pointing out that there's a spectrum; using any of the alternative terms would have indicated a different position on that spectrum. Yes, your suggested terms are shibboleths for particular positions on this spectrum. "Indian", however, is used by people all over the spectrum, and cannot by itself be taken as an indicator of anything. That, or I have badly misread Russell Means' politics.
  • 10:14 AM - TheCosmicKid quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Title uses Indians rather than Natives, Trans-Bering Americans, First Peoples, etc. (and OP later uses "Red Indian"). Too many of the people in question call themselves "Indians" for you to be insisting on alternatives, methinks. (The term in the parenthetical, however, is another matter.)

Wednesday, 15th August, 2018

  • 07:15 PM - dragoner quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Some of us just accept what we were taught as children, and disregard any further input which doesn't match that paradigm; while others check those teachings against ongoing observation, truth testing, consistency checking. I think that divide might be part of the tensions of this thread, if you know what I mean. Which is anathema if you are in a science oriented career, data forms the conclusion, so that could change with new data. Though America in general seems to be turning away from science.
  • 12:41 PM - Thomas Bowman quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    A Kryptonian immigrant raised on the Kent family farm, heir to the property title, has a personal stake in the matter, though the heritage is adoptive rather than genetic. SNL did a skit in which Kal-El happened to land in Germany, and he was raised with different values. If the capsule had landed farther north, and Kal-El grew up as an adopted Algonquin... "for truth, justice, and the Native American way!" Though his features might match less conveniently with his adoptive parents. It doesn't have anything to do with a role playing setting however
  • 07:49 AM - TheCosmicKid quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    A Kryptonian immigrant raised on the Kent family farm, heir to the property title, has a personal stake in the matter, though the heritage is adoptive rather than genetic. I'd have said "Mars", but the reference to that other Justice Leaguer would not have been as clear. I think the point is made regardless. SNL did a skit in which Kal-El happened to land in Germany, and he was raised with different values. If the capsule had landed farther north, and Kal-El grew up as an adopted Algonquin... "for truth, justice, and the Native American way!" Though his features might match less conveniently with his adoptive parents.Marooned alien babies with superpowers are not only surprisingly common in comic book universes, but also uncannily fortuitous in matching the features of their adoptive parents. Only Dwayne McDuffie, it seems, has bothered explaining that his character Icon came in a lifepod which genetically altered his physiology to allow him to fit in (though crashing in a cotton field in ...

Tuesday, 14th August, 2018

  • 07:14 AM - Thomas Bowman quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    I understand the dynamics you describe, in that scenario. *If* I accepted your scenario as a typical example, then I'd be closer to agreeing with your larger judgements. You ask "Wouldn't you be?" for whether I identify with the farmer, and not for whether I identify with the nomad. You show a relatable moment among the farmers, zooming in on a shrug interaction between husband and wife. You don't zoom in on the nomads the same way, such as a nomad child asking her mother "Who are these people on our winter lands? Is it safe to play with their children?" Do you think of the farmers as speaking your native language? perhaps they're even your very distant relatives? Anyways. My main question remains unanswered. Here is my main question. If you can't answer it, then I might as well go chat with birthers and Flat Earth podcasters. Do you get that story, that scenario, from popular culture, such as Lone Ranger episodes, or from evidence-based historical accounts, or somewhere else? ...

Monday, 13th August, 2018

  • 05:15 PM - Gradine quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    But that was my only assertion! Otherwise, I asked questions. (No fair answering the easy ones and leaving Thomas with the hard ones.) Mongols in 1200s present a divergent case, in which nomad does not equal hunter-gatherer, nor hapless victim. Beduin case also divergent, since nomads and village-dwellers both speak Arabic; I don't know the nuances of that relationship, neither as practiced in pre-industrial centuries nor as it stands today. I gather that the relationship between the Congo forest people (aka pygmies) and the village peoples (such as Bantu) has changed since Turnbull wrote "The Forest People", shifting from co-existence towards genocide, as industrialization accelerates deforestation (among other factors). Oh the Mongols... always the exception...
  • 03:53 PM - Thomas Bowman quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Does this scenario accurately describe Columbus with the Taino? Captain James Cook with the Hawaiians? Mongol nomads with Polish farmers? The Norse Vinlanders with the aboriginal Vinlanders? The British with the Australian aborigines? The Luba with the Batwa? Village-dwelling Arabs and nomadic Beduin Arabs? You have to describe each situation more specifically, as I have no idea. My point is the situation itself puts the two groups into conflict, neither side is responsible for the conflict in the case I just mentioned. As far as the farmer knows the land he wants to build a farmstead out of is unoccupied, he has no evidence to point out to him otherwise until the hunting party of Indians show up. From the Indians' point of view, they always hunted here, and when the game got scarce, they moved on to some other hunting ground, allowing time for the game to replenish itself, and when the game at the other hunting ground becomes scarce, they move back here. There are not ...
  • 03:45 PM - Thomas Bowman quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Alternate point of view: there is a practical problem with agricultural societies. Is that story - "haloooo" - an accurate summary of what actually happened? With the conflict coming down to a single homesteading family, versus a traveling band of hunter-gatherers? Do you get that story, that scenario, from popular culture, such as Lone Ranger episodes, or from evidence-based historical accounts, or somewhere else? Do hunter gatherer societies respect each other's territories, even when not immediately occupied? If so, how? My point is that its not obvious to a family of farmers that an apparently unoccupied piece of land is actually some nomadic tribe's hunting ground, and they make their decision assuming the land is unoccupied as there are no signs posted telling them other wise, and once they put the work into the land, clearing it and building a farm house, they are reluctant to leave. Wouldn't you be?
  • 09:23 AM - TheCosmicKid quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    The Norse Vinlanders with the aboriginal Vinlanders? Actually, it might be accurate for that one.
  • 09:21 AM - TheCosmicKid quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Alternate point of view: there is a practical problem with agricultural societies. If hunter-gatherer societies consistently lose their land to agricultural societies (and they do), then I have to concede that the hunter-gatherers are the ones with the practical problem. Everything else you have to say about the questionable accuracy of the scenario is, of course, true.

Sunday, 12th August, 2018

  • 05:10 PM - Thomas Bowman quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Yes. David Drake wrote an homage to Kuttner presuming that terraforming could bring about a Venus which matched the 1950s descriptions. But we digress; my point was whether contact could be anything other than colonialism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus_in_fiction There is a practical problem with hunter gather societies, they range over a large territory, so it is really hard to tell which land is theirs. They don't put up fences, and they don't put up signs. And then some settlers show up and they find some forest, and they shout, "Halooo! Is anyone there?!" and they hear their voices echo off of the mountainside, but they don't get any reply. They don't see any cultivated fields or farm animals, and again they shout, "Haloooo! Does anyone live here?" And their shouts echo off the mountain again. The farmer looks at his wife, and his wife shrugs her shoulders, and the farmer says, "Well I guess nobody lives here." So he pulls out his axe and starts chopping down trees to build a f...

Friday, 10th August, 2018


Thursday, 9th August, 2018

  • 08:48 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    If you catch someone showing off and scoring points, do you then score a meta-point, for revealing that person's ego-driven agenda? (If so, do I then score a meta-meta-point, for naming your knock-it-off agenda?) You have the option to stop following this thread, if you don't find it useful for your own table. Threads sometimes sputter out with "no, I'm right!" "no, you're wrong!", whether that's over history, or over RAW vs RAI, or photon torpedoes versus proton torpedoes, or some other impasse. For what it's worth: every time I've researched something TheCosmicKid mentioned, the details checked out. (As factual, though large-scale conclusions of causality or morality generally remain arguable indefinitely, into the realm of ideology.) My point is people are better off looking this stuff up themselves, examining the arguments themselves, rather than taking posters on EnWorld as their source on historical knowledge and analysis. I am not saying you can't have the discussion, or that you all ...
  • 02:13 PM - Eltab quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    Is it possible, among humans, for group A to encounter group B, where group A have the technology to travel to location B but not vice versa, and for group A to *not* conquer and enslave group B? I'm going to reinforce the 'yes' given above. The Pilgrims came to America, found an empty corner of land (Plymouth), and moved in. They tried (by their lights) to treat the nearby Indian tribes with respect. When the larger Massachusettes Bay colony moved in nearby, the troubled relationships began. Alternate History: What if the Pilgrim model for interacting with the Indians had become the norm for British America?

Wednesday, 8th August, 2018

  • 10:02 PM - Shasarak quoted Riley37 in post American Indians Colonize the Old world in 1250 BC
    From what I've read, Columbus treated the Taino much, much worse than they treated him and his crews. Columbus wrote about selling girls aged 9 and 10 as slaves. The Aztec empire practiced slavery and indenture, but what I've read about them doesn't include selling *children* as slaves. The Aztecs may have been human sacrificing heathens but at least they had standards. o_O


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