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  • iserith's Avatar
    Today, 06:37 PM
    My experience is that even if the player has an "easy" characteristic to claim for Inspiration, there's a certain amount of social credit that comes with using even the "easy" ones in a way that is just a bit more clever than the last guy or gal to have claimed Inspiration. So what I'll see is someone holding out on that "easy" one until the perfect moment for the most impact, sometimes even...
    9 replies | 196 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Today, 04:54 PM
    One other side note, as some people I play with who are also DMs are discussing it in Discord: Players who aren't particularly system savvy might not see Inspiration as valuable even with its low cost and high return. In a sea of options, it may not stand out as a thing they should be regularly claiming and spending. There may also be a correlation to how much action-oriented content is...
    9 replies | 196 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Today, 04:32 PM
    It's weird when players given the option to gain a resource that gives them advantage when they need it at practically no cost don't go for it. I suspect this might have something to do with the difficulty of the challenges being presented in the game, but it could be many things.
    9 replies | 196 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Today, 04:10 PM
    I put all this on the players so I don't have to remember anything or suggest to them how to play their characters: The Case for Inspiration.
    9 replies | 196 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Today, 01:01 PM
    Frankly, I prefer to determine as many outcomes as I can without rolling dice, unless the outcome is uncertain. So while I 'could' determine randomly if a particular faction is at a specific location, as a DM I know if it is likely for the faction to be there. Just like I know if there are wandering monsters about. I could roll randomly to decide if the players encounter monsters, but my...
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Today, 12:38 PM
    I often try to instill terror in my players by describing the twisted shapes of certain monsters, and making it clear that their characters could suffer the same fate.
    11 replies | 366 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:06 PM
    I stripped them right out of the section on Alignment in the Basic Rules, so while I can claim credit for the adaptation of Inspiration, I cannot claim the definitions.
    11 replies | 342 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:57 PM
    Yes, this is how I run Inspiration for most games: The Case for Inspiration. And for my Planescape game, a setting which makes rather a big deal out of alignment, I added this bit: Alignment In the rare times when the forces of Law and Chaos are in balance, alignment matters little in the grand scheme. But in these dark times, with coterminous Planes of Evil influencing events on Clichéa,...
    11 replies | 342 view(s)
    3 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:41 PM
    Alignment rules, in many cases, justify why a lot of monsters may be wantonly slaughtered without a hit to the ol' conscience. According to those rules, the evil deities who created certain races made those races to serve them and "have strong inborn tendencies that match the nature of their gods." So most orcs, for example, are evil, act accordingly and deserve what's coming to them. As well,...
    11 replies | 366 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Friday, 15th February, 2019, 12:52 PM
    Lovely work. Not enough DM's create round dungeons, or include round elements in their mazes, so props to you sir. I also like how part of the dungeon has collapsed, thus breaking the symmetry that is so common in lots of D&D maps. Can one of your next maps perhaps include lots of height differences? Balconies, bridges and the like? I think those types of dungeon designs we also don't see...
    233 replies | 20416 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Thursday, 14th February, 2019, 12:59 PM
    Have the devil take control of the minion that summoned him, and empower him. After the minion is defeated, his spirit is set free, but the players will think he is dead. Allow the players to go on a different quest, while the devil regains his power and builds his fortress. Then have them find out what he's been working on many sessions later.
    6 replies | 248 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Thursday, 14th February, 2019, 12:45 PM
    Yeah, I really like the reactive fire rule. The system steps away from the idea of everyone taking turns, and instead allows actions based on what is happening during a fight. If one squad moves forward, they move forward until they are stopped, and enemies can respond to this by making attacks as the squad moves out of cover. It's not perfect, but its a lot closer to modeling the chaotic...
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Wednesday, 13th February, 2019, 01:05 PM
    There are systems that allow simultaneous combat resolution just fine, and are faster than D&D. Like the game Crossfire for example, which simulates WWII era battles.
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Tuesday, 12th February, 2019, 09:32 PM
    There's an online comparison of low-level fighters across editions, looking at how many individual goblins a fighter can kill before the fighter drops. My google-fu is failing me to find the link, but IIRC his results for the 5e fighter are pretty similar to 4e fighter, something like 15+ goblins.
    44 replies | 1071 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Monday, 11th February, 2019, 12:46 PM
    In my 3rd edition campaign I try to some what approach this with the 3x critical effect of guns. But as you say, with large pools of health, all semblance of realism goes out the window.
    99 replies | 3868 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Sunday, 10th February, 2019, 12:07 PM
    Well, it was originally about the perception of realism in a roleplaying game. I can certainly see why a combat/armor system that has no clear explanation within the fiction of its setting, can ruin the sense of realism in a game. It doesn't ruin it for me personally, but I can certainly imagine how the alternative: a system that works both mechanically and narratively, can greatly add to the...
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Saturday, 9th February, 2019, 04:39 PM
    I'd say yes, because of how with other monsters with Etherealness (e.g. ghosts & phase spiders), it's apparent you're still intended to track the monster's location during combat even while it's on the Ethereal.
    1 replies | 174 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Saturday, 9th February, 2019, 12:16 PM
    "He" is the correct gender attribution, and you are entirely correct in your description of my position on this issue. For me the mechanics are just that, mechanics. I don't need an explanation for how it works within the fiction of the game. Though I can understand why someone may prefer a system that also makes sense within the game's fiction. Sometimes I think about how it might be fun to play...
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Friday, 8th February, 2019, 04:48 PM
    It does not need to make sense. It is merely a means of scaling up the combat difficulty of a tough monster. Players are not meant to be upscaled as such, since they already have plenty of other power boosts in the form of spells and other equipment. If they allowed players to obtain similar amounts of armor, it would lead to infinite power creep that is impossible to balance encounters for.
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
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  • Bawylie's Avatar
    Friday, 8th February, 2019, 02:42 AM
    1.) Instead of setting DCs for tasks, use the “roll under” ability check. You’ve got 13 strength, want to know if you can lift a rock? Roll 1d20. Under 13, you succeed. You have 16 con. Save vs poison? Roll 1d20 and get under 16 to succeed. Keep the “ability modifier” for damage rolls. Proficiency bonus adds to the target number instead of the roll. You have 16 con but +2 to to con saves. To...
    38 replies | 940 view(s)
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  • Bawylie's Avatar
    Thursday, 7th February, 2019, 07:33 PM
    I use them. I like them. I’ve used word searches to decipher scrolls, mazes to pick locks, clue style logic puzzles for mysteries (seriously this is easy to set up and easy to play out), simon or memory for disarming traps. I’ve used those wood puzzle blocks for crafting a magic item. I’ve used liars dice for duels & negotiations. Heck I’ve used hangman and the picnic game for password...
    45 replies | 1452 view(s)
    3 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Thursday, 7th February, 2019, 07:17 PM
    A wizard with all utility spells (buff, control, debuff). For extra fun, don't take a single damaging spell.
    22 replies | 701 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Thursday, 7th February, 2019, 01:08 PM
    As I understand it, natural armor is not only the material, but also the thickness of a creature's tough skin, as well as a way to balance its difficulty. But I don't think it was meant to give 'a veneer of simulation' at all. It's part of 3rd edition's armor mechanic, and that's it. Why do you need to make an exact call about what it is? Does it change anything about the gameplay?
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Thursday, 7th February, 2019, 12:35 AM
    I don't know what Deekin Scalesinger is, but if it's cute, kill it with extra fire!
    61 replies | 21173 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 08:25 PM
    That sounds reasonable, but I'd have to further review the rules for movement to determine whether the Ready rule is an exception to the limitations of movement.
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 07:57 PM
    Are you sure you can move and Ready a move, if the readied move exceeds your normal speed?
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 05:20 PM
    I can't achieve "immersion" without parody. To wit: Mario Does D&D Joust
    19 replies | 747 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 03:42 PM
    Yes, you can ready a move as I said upthread I believe. But readying a Dash does nothing since it does not allow you to move.
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 01:01 PM
    Max has a habit of making commonly understood terms so broad, that they lose a lot of their discussion-value, and this keeps coming up again and again in lots of discussions on this board. Perhaps it would be more constructive to stick with the convential way in which the term is used, Max? I think you (Max) know that when we use the word realism, we are referring to a style of play that...
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 12:39 PM
    I over-prepare a session earlier, leaving very little to prepare for the next. So basically I am in this constant cycle of preparing a lot, and not preparing much of all. It is far from ideal, but I'm obsessed with getting all the details nailed down. Most of the work goes into drawing out dungeons, and statting monsters. But a fair amount of work also goes into detailing various locations. ...
    22 replies | 642 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 12:36 AM
    I don't think the game would break if you think of Dash as an "extra move." There might be some weird spell interactions. Or maybe a class feature would go awry (?). But otherwise it would probably work fine and it seems more intuitive that way to me.
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Wednesday, 6th February, 2019, 12:00 AM
    A lot of people make him cute. And I find that deeply disappointing.
    61 replies | 21173 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Tuesday, 5th February, 2019, 11:59 PM
    I am in no way defending the sub-par chase rules in D&D 5e, but the key thing in that system is not the movement but the hiding at the end of the round. The quarry getting away due to outrunning pursuers is far less common than hiding. The "bungie effect" you mention should only be happening if the quarry is constantly failing Dexterity (Stealth) checks - and if you're a PC, this is when you...
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Tuesday, 5th February, 2019, 11:56 PM
    Dash only increases your speed. It does not allow you to move.
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
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  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Tuesday, 5th February, 2019, 09:27 PM
    Goblin ambushes. Not traps (that's a kobold thing), but ambushes like where a group of goblin archers retreat in terror of the "big folk" after lobbing some arrows only for a dozen goblins to be waiting around the corner to stab PCs pursuing the archers. That kind of thing. Also, this typically goes along with the classic "so you've captured a goblin, now what?" scenario.
    16 replies | 645 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Tuesday, 5th February, 2019, 08:04 PM
    A small suggestion on this solution: If you go with what is essentially mechanics first and frame the fiction around that as truth, then I encourage you to enlist the help of your players to think about how that looks in the fiction for their own characters. "You had to hesitate a bit..." can be seen as the DM playing the character. But if you let them offer that up themselves, it comes with...
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Tuesday, 5th February, 2019, 12:46 PM
    No, you're conflating two entirely different points here. The DM is not saying "No, you can't go to the teahouse", nor is he saying "No, there is no teahouse". Those two things would be examples of a DM going against the idea of "Yes, and...". But whether the teahouse is actually a location where the players may run into members of this sect, is a whole different matter. I could allow the...
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Tuesday, 5th February, 2019, 02:13 AM
    Monster Manual has giant wasp (CR 1/2). Tomb of Annihilation has assassin vine (CR 3). Tome of Beasts (Kobold Press) has giant ant (CR 2). Quests of Doom vol. 2 (Frog God Games) has a couple CR 1 giant ant varieties.
    9 replies | 316 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 10:12 PM
    Right, and I think this is a good skill to develop as a DM and player: "How can I make the fiction work if I accept the mechanical limitations as true?" Then just run down a list of reasonable fictional explanations until you find one that doesn't bother you and go with that. The fiction is highly mutable, especially in an fantasy setting.
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 09:43 PM
    Yes, you need to start with the story, but there's totally a way. Was there a particular fey monster you were looking at? I used a fey version of trolls back in an old game, where the local kingdom referred to them as "treows" (always warding themselves superstitiously by biting an iron nail or rapping something iron when they said the name). The "treows" were said to grow from putrescent...
    52 replies | 1915 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 09:35 PM
    Can you go into more detailed on what you mean by "fey-themed?" We're probably all coming at this with varied perspectives on what that means.
    52 replies | 1915 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 09:31 PM
    Readying a Dash is a waste. But you can Ready movement. So at least there's that.
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 09:12 PM
    My riddles are always just dirty jokes from a filthy gnome or the like. I find this is more fun. Unfortunately, providing examples would be against the forum rules.
    45 replies | 1452 view(s)
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  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 08:31 PM
    iserith replied to Pesky Players
    One thing you might address with the players in general is something I put in my Table Rules:"'Metagaming,' defined as using player skill or knowledge that a character might not necessarily have, is fine as long as it's fun for everyone and helps contribute to an exciting, memorable story. Assumptions can be risky though so it's skillful play to verify your assumptions through in-game actions...
    11 replies | 483 view(s)
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  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 07:31 PM
    The blogger makes some decent points. There are a couple points that I didn't see addressed: (1) I aspire to tie my puzzles into the narrative in ways that make sense. For instance, the puzzle in spoilers below was designed by an arrogant necromancer-warlord, so it makes sense that some form of necromancy is involved in its solution & further that the solution is a testament to past battles...
    45 replies | 1452 view(s)
    3 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 05:35 PM
    This probably won't come up enough to require a house rule, so I recommend just ruling what makes sense in the moment to you based on how much you value using the rules versus what you think is a reasonable thing to do given the fictional context. That's why we have DMs instead of computers - to decide on these things in the moment.
    56 replies | 1466 view(s)
    2 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 04:04 PM
    The only reason I allow multiclassing is because I have a player pool (way more players than seats in a given session) and, in general, it's better to have more options than fewer options in such a set up so that there is less overlap between concepts. In a standard group of 4 to 6 players, I don't think multiclassing is necessary at all. There are plenty of classes, subclasses, and races in my...
    115 replies | 3447 view(s)
    2 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 03:42 PM
    This also isn't an issue if you don't use the optional multiclassing rules. Feats and multiclassing get treated by many as if they are a core part of the game. They are not. They're variant rules like any other in this edition and I always adjust my expectations when it comes to variant rules to avoid such dissatisfaction.
    115 replies | 3447 view(s)
    9 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 01:07 PM
    I'm not sure if I've ever played in a group that plays this way. In all of the games I have played, or been the DM for, the DM already has an idea what is at the teahouse. Any suggestions made by the players may, but won't necesarily change his preestablished ideas. For example: My players are currently inside an underground cathedral, where they see evil monks carrying a coffin around with...
    334 replies | 8463 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 12:53 PM
    Something that annoys me to no end, is when the DM uses his npc's to force actions on the players. In my opinion, a game of D&D is all about choices. The players choose what they want to do, and more importantly, what they do NOT want to do. I hate it when the DM then decides to have the npc do that thing that we didn't want to do, to force something to happen. Say for example that there is a...
    82 replies | 3152 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 12:48 PM
    What I tend to do when designing my dungeons, is create a list of various 'dungeon details' that I can randomly insert anywhere, at any point. These may include a fresco on a wall, a particular painting or statue, etc. I use these to fill gaps where nothing of interest seems to be happening. These details don't really rely on a specific location, but can contain plot-relevant information that is...
    5 replies | 315 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Monday, 4th February, 2019, 12:41 PM
    I don't think that is as important as the movie just being a good follow up the original Ghostbusters movies... which it wasn't. I also don't think these sorts of issues should be (ab)used to deflect genuine criticism of the movie.
    140 replies | 5142 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Saturday, 2nd February, 2019, 08:45 PM
    The only official rulings at my table are my rulings.
    75 replies | 2443 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Saturday, 2nd February, 2019, 07:54 PM
    Unless death is taken off the table as a possible result, character death and the odd TPK can happen. In order to prepare for that contingency, we have backup characters ready to go at all times who are already "written in" to the ongoing tale and can jump in to take over where their comrades left off.
    26 replies | 1175 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Saturday, 2nd February, 2019, 04:28 PM
    Thanks, Eltab! I also was thinking along the lines of animating vines...however as I'm leaning on that in other parts of the adventure...I adapted it for a "stone wyrm." Here's the puzzle I ended up with for Sunday's game... The Nsi Nkondi & Tithing Obelisk An overgrown 60-foot-tall stone obelisk rises from where the hilly jungles meet swampy mire of the Nsi Wastes. The western side of...
    434 replies | 141872 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Saturday, 2nd February, 2019, 02:37 PM
    Maybe a belonging of the deceased must change hands? The Black Network is all about the transactional economy free from tariffs and regulations, right? Maybe when you receive this item, which is passed about the room during the night it's customary to say "to the black earth, all are crowned" (or some such), and then proceed with the ritual tankard pouring / gold donation to the family that lost...
    4 replies | 259 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Friday, 1st February, 2019, 12:43 PM
    A cure for a fictional disease (that maybe only affects a particular species).
    23 replies | 837 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Friday, 1st February, 2019, 09:17 AM
    Something I've put together for Sunday's game – it's meant to be a "tithing obelisk" once used during Ras Nsi's governance of the region (he used to send out zombie tax collectors among the tribes of Chult), but it probably can double as the obelisk in front of the Tomb as well. Trying to design a puzzle to go with it too!
    434 replies | 141872 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Friday, 1st February, 2019, 12:58 AM
    Quickleaf replied to Archetypes
    Think of it this way: the character mechanics you want to support your old AD&D2e character concept are all present in a 5e Rogue (Thief) with certain skill/tool proficiency selection and perhaps background choice. In 5e, you just get some extra things on top of that to keep your rogue contributing/surviving in combat. In fact IIRC, back in AD&D2e, your rogue character couldn't even be of...
    58 replies | 2468 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Thursday, 31st January, 2019, 09:00 PM
    A Spark of Joy. Also known as the Joy-Spark.
    5 replies | 318 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Thursday, 31st January, 2019, 07:53 PM
    My standard disclaimer, since it's always relevant in my view: D&D 5e is not an "upgrade" or "patch" to AD&D 2e or any other version of D&D. They are entirely different games that come with different rules and assumptions that demand different approaches for the game to work optimally and to arrive at the intended play experience. Therefore, I highly recommend you forget what you know about...
    48 replies | 1785 view(s)
    8 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Thursday, 31st January, 2019, 05:45 PM
    If the game uses the optional Feats rules, choose the Sharpshooter feat and take the -5 to hit and +10 to damage against monsters with low ACs or when you have advantage. It will be hilarious when you do 17 damage with a sling in a single attack. Think of all the David and Goliath jokes.
    48 replies | 1785 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Thursday, 31st January, 2019, 01:03 PM
    Playing out the shopping can be fun, but I only do it if I have cool ideas for it (an interesting location or npc). And if my players have a ton of shopping to do, I just skip it and let them take care of it during down time.
    55 replies | 2795 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Thursday, 31st January, 2019, 12:54 PM
    Just for the record, if any of my players are on this forum... remember how much you like your current character and be extra nice about me.
    55 replies | 2795 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Thursday, 31st January, 2019, 12:47 PM
    I don't think that's entirely fair. This sort of issue can also come up when running a published adventure. If you and your players all agree to sit down and play a published adventure, then you expect your players to not run away from it. If you decide to play a campaign revolving around killing a dragon, the players shouldn't be running off in the opposite direction. Plus, she didn't...
    82 replies | 3152 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Thursday, 31st January, 2019, 06:59 AM
    One example was Wongo's Monkeypod Ruins... Party (at the time five 5th-level PCs and a couple NPCs) found a defensible resting place on a hill overlooking the river. Overgrown ruins around an old rune-carved monkeypod tree, with stylized girallon (four-armed gorilla) statues in alcoves. PCs noticed 2 were actually zombie girallons (CR 3) perfectly blended into the alcoves with a layer of...
    20 replies | 750 view(s)
    1 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Wednesday, 30th January, 2019, 11:40 PM
    I'm pretty lucky in that most everything is pretty easily remembered by my players, better than myself even which is nice. I can rely on them to remind me of things after my fourth Jameson. I actually can't remember the last time we actually had to look something up outside of the odd spell or whatever. Inspiration in particular is used a lot in my games, chiefly because of how I set it up.
    29 replies | 1242 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Wednesday, 30th January, 2019, 10:34 PM
    If you're looking for lower power zombies, this might interest you... During our game, my players recovered a McGuffin and performed a ritual weakening all zombies in the world. Essentially, it stripped the zombies of their hit points, reduced their Constitution to 10, and modified their Undead Fortitude trait... Undead Fortitude. The zombie is destroyed if it takes radiant damage or...
    9 replies | 366 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Wednesday, 30th January, 2019, 12:53 PM
    While it may not be the worst 'crime', what really annoys me (and pops up often), is one player blocking the action of another player. For example, one player wants to search a desk, and the rogue in the party immediately declares "I search it too!", or "Let me search it, my search skill is higher than yours!". Just let a player do their own thing. If you want to search something so badly,...
    82 replies | 3152 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Wednesday, 30th January, 2019, 05:25 AM
    I'll third Tome of Beasts (Kobold Press). Outstanding. Looking forward to picking up their Creature Codex.
    14 replies | 802 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 09:42 PM
    You might want to read up on the differences between DrivethruRPG (use the 5e SRD) and DMs Guild (use specific Intellectual Property & reference spells, magic items, and monster stats not covered in 5e SRD), both operated by OneBookshelf. Here's a reddit discussion: https://www.reddit.com/r/dndnext/comments/7nlorc/drivethrurpg_vs_dmsguild_question_about_what_i/ 1. On DMs Guild you can directly...
    2 replies | 246 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Bawylie's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 08:47 PM
    I have a number of paper minis but I don’t use those stands. @Trashmobminis makes a paper stand that I use. I use packing tape as laminate. The whole thing is sufficiently sturdy, lightweight, and storeable. I also use regular minis.
    5 replies | 297 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 08:31 PM
    You might want to find a list of insults because for some reason DMs often ask bards to say what they do for the Vicious Mockery cantrip, whereas many other classes and cantrips don't get the same treatment.
    9 replies | 366 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 01:02 PM
    I run a pirate campaign, where I usually tackle interactions by the npc crew off-screen. During combat, I don't want to roll for the hundreds of pirates taking part in the battle. So I tell my players, everyone joins in on the fight, but for the sake of clarity, I will only focus on you (the players), your cohorts, and enemies that are fighting you. Just use your imagination, and imagine a...
    55 replies | 2795 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 12:58 PM
    I use the system as written, but often roll group initiative for enemies that are of the same type. So while a boss-enemy may gets his own initiative, his minions tend to share one group-initiative. Because this just means I have less rolling to do, and it is easier to keep track of enemy turns when they're not all out of order.
    144 replies | 4265 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 12:54 PM
    One of the most important things I learned, along with the concept of a session 0.
    27 replies | 1172 view(s)
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  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 12:51 PM
    I want to see future movies build more on the mythos, and create mythos their own. But that would take talented writers and a minimum of effort.
    140 replies | 5142 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 12:48 PM
    Love the dungeon terrain. I wish I had more of it myself, especially mini-furniture.
    8 replies | 752 view(s)
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  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Tuesday, 29th January, 2019, 04:23 AM
    Objectively superior, exactly.
    26 replies | 1047 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Monday, 28th January, 2019, 11:57 PM
    Along the lines of your "No Pets" rule, we try to keep summons down to a bare minimum. A couple campaigns ago, someone wanted to play a necromancer and the player asked, "How many skeletons and zombies can I have at one time?" My response was "As many as you want until it starts to slow the game down, then they'll just start exploding for no apparent reason." The other notable rule is Don't...
    55 replies | 2795 view(s)
    5 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Monday, 28th January, 2019, 10:18 PM
    Yeah, I'd suggest starting them at 3rd level. For the guide(s), I'd suggest tailoring the guide(s) based on whatever party roles your 2 players don't cover. Say they decide to play a ranger and a sorcerer, and neither has healing magic or thieves' tools proficiency. I'd steer them towards guides who might have those sorts of skills. For example, Eku is known as an accomplished healer, and...
    22 replies | 1154 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Monday, 28th January, 2019, 10:05 PM
    Good question. I've been running Tomb of Annihilation, and there have been plenty of zombie encounters. What I realized very quickly is that the real excitement in facing zombies is not in the mechanics of the combat, but in the overall scenario in which they're encountered. In other words, I started thinking of zombies as hazards/puzzles to be overcome, more than just monsters to defeat. Here...
    9 replies | 366 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Monday, 28th January, 2019, 09:47 PM
    Doc_Klueless Many of 4e's rituals are already in the game as spells or class features... Explosive Runes > Glyph of Warding, Eye of Alarm > alarm, Familiar Mount > find steed or perhaps class features, Far Sending > sending, Find the Path > find the path, Fools' Gold > various illusion spells, Forbiddance > forbiddance, etc. I'd be wary about interpreting 4e rituals as level ÷ 3 = PC level...
    26 replies | 1047 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Monday, 28th January, 2019, 01:05 PM
    In my 3.5 pirate campaign, flintlock pistols do 1d10 damage, and flintlock rifles do 1d12. And this seems pretty well balanced for this particular system. It makes guns pretty deadly, but there is the drawback of the long reload times, and the possibility of gunpowder getting wet, and misfires. To balance things out, I allow feats and spells that normally only work with arrows/projectiles, to...
    99 replies | 3868 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Imaculata's Avatar
    Monday, 28th January, 2019, 12:33 PM
    That has always been one of the weirdest throw away lines in the film to me.
    140 replies | 5142 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Monday, 28th January, 2019, 12:36 AM
    I want this adventure (probably 2-3 sessions long) to offer my players several approaches in how they resolve the challenges of the Valley of Dread... this is all a work in progress and I welcome your feedback or critique... :) 1. Assassination If the players decide to assassinate Kes’thak the Lizard King before he becomes too powerful, they’ll need to (A) get an “inside lizardman”, (B) find...
    10 replies | 538 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Sunday, 27th January, 2019, 07:19 PM
    I honestly couldn't say. I don't really look at the character sheets when I DM. I imagine most everyone has at least a 10 as that's what I do when I play, but I'm not sure what others do. My overriding concern is the play experience at the table. "Did we achieve the goals of play this session, that is, everyone having fun and an exciting, memorable story being created as a result of...
    105 replies | 4958 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Quickleaf's Avatar
    Sunday, 27th January, 2019, 05:50 PM
    I use the normal system. For my current group, the predictability is a feature; it helps my players keep track of effects, helps with their understanding of the scene, and allows someone to slip away to use the bathroom, grab a soda, or handle a phone call and be back in time for their next turn. When I have chance to do advance planning, I prefer to pre-roll monster / NPC initiatives to...
    144 replies | 4265 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Sunday, 27th January, 2019, 03:11 AM
    I use initiative as per the Basic Rules. It's good enough.
    144 replies | 4265 view(s)
    0 XP
  • iserith's Avatar
    Saturday, 26th January, 2019, 07:23 PM
    You could choose not to use the optional feats and multiclassing rules. Otherwise, this seems like a thing to "fix" with a fictional explanation as to why this is that you can personally swallow rather than a change to the mechanics.
    11 replies | 499 view(s)
    0 XP
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Sunday, 10th February, 2019

  • 03:58 AM - pemerton mentioned Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Outsider Perspective: Is this line of debate going anywhere productive? It seems like instead of debating the placement of goalposts or the number of angels that can dance on the AC of dragons, that the participants should reset and refocus their lines.From my point of view I've made my points and think they're clear. My exchange with Imaculata was brief but sensible, and I think we understand one another and our different ways into, and hence responses to, the issue. If you'd like me to elaborate or explain again, though, I'm happy to.

Saturday, 9th February, 2019

  • 08:27 AM - pemerton mentioned Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Why are you so fixated on what is power level x as compared to power level y? I don't understand.Because if I introduced 75th level characters into a game then I would also be introducing 75th level (or thereabouts) dragons, which - as I pointed out - would have natural armour bonuses that exceed the most powerful armour that can be forged by mages and godlings in the setting. Which is to say, the issue that I dislike - the simulationist veneer of "natural armour" - would still be there. If you're still confused by my concern, I recommend Imaculata's posts above. Imaculata doesn't get irritated in the way I do because he (? I apologise if that's an erroneous gender attribution) is able to treat the natural armour bonuses as purely mechanical devices to ensure the game maths works properly. I can't muster the same sanguinity, but Imaculata's response shows a clear understanding of the issue I'm raising and addresses it completely sensibly (and without any frustration on my part at least).

Thursday, 4th October, 2018

  • 04:40 PM - iserith mentioned Imaculata in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    ...olved until everyone sees the situation the same way and then roll the dice, or don’t, as the situation requires. So at least as I read the DW rules, there is no reason why a player who declares I search the rubble shouldn't then pick up his/her 2d6 and roll them. If s/he gets an 11 or 12 (like the 20 in your example) then the GM is obliged to provide a certain sort of information, as specified in the rules (eg What here is not what it appears to be?). The pile of rubble matters (regardless of whether the GM thought it would or wouldn't) because the player has (i) decided to pay attention to it, and (ii) succeeded at a check. As I said, what strikes me in your example is that the player hasn't indicated what s/he is looking for, and so hasn't given the GM very much context to hang a response on. I find it easier to narrate successes (and failures) when I have some sense of what the player thinks is at stake in the situation. This isn't Dungeon World though. It's D&D 3.Xe (for Imaculata at least). What is missing from the player's example in a D&D context in my view is an approach to the goal (and to some extent the goal more specifically). I would prefer to hear something like "I want to use my shovel to move the rubble around to see if I find anything useful or valuable." Maybe there's something valuable there, maybe there's not (the example scenario suggests there isn't). But at least the DM isn't assuming or establishing what the character is doing. In another context, one where there's something potentially dangerous in the rubble, I'd want to know how the player is having the character go about searching as per my preferred statement. This avoids issues of the DM and player disagreeing about what the character was doing after the danger is revealed. The DM may have imagined the player digging into the rubble with his or her hands; the player may have imagined using a shovel. That's going to be a problem when being stricken with rot grubs or contact poison is on ...

Monday, 27th August, 2018

  • 07:41 PM - Loren Keely mentioned Imaculata in post Katana
    Imaculata This is just what I was thinking. I sent him a breakdown and this was almost exactly the concept I was thinking. Great minds think alike I guess. I will also look for that Dragon magazine issue.

Wednesday, 27th June, 2018

  • 09:39 AM - Jhaelen mentioned Imaculata in post Death and Storytelling
    No fudging or nerfing necessary. Unless your definition of nerfing is "modifying encounters to be something other than suicide-death-pacts." Allow me to first remind you of the original statement I've been responding to: During the early levels, all encounters are fairly balanced, so that deaths are just not going to happen. Also, please note that Imaculata is playing D&D 3.5. Now, to address your points: PCs can choose to run away from fights.Yep, they can do that. As a DM I may even suggest it. But it's not under my control whether they actually do try to flee or not. If a fight is unavoidable, PCs can throw down their weapons and beg for mercy.See above! PCs can enlist help to attain overwhelming odds.See above! GMs can provide level-appropriate encounters.There's a very clear definition how difficult encounters should be in the 3.5 DMG (page 48, I think). Unfortunately, I'm away from my books and failed to find the exact text. I only found the Encounter Calculator that is based on these assumptions. I.e. 10% of all encounters should be 'easy', 50% should be 'Challenging', 15% should be very hard, 5% should be overpowering. IIRC, the remaining encounters should be 'very hard', but there should be a way for the PCs to turn it into a 'challenging' encounter if they approach it in a clever way. GMs can play opponents int...

Sunday, 24th June, 2018

  • 12:54 AM - Maxperson mentioned Imaculata in post Everybody Cheats?
    Yes, exactly. Of course sometimes as a DM there is nothing you can do. We were playing many years ago and the players, of which I was one, could not roll dice for toffee. I have never seen an entire party roll like that in 30+ years of playing. Individuals certainly but not everyone! Poor DM didn't stand a chance. There wasn't even something subtle he could do. Something extreme on the DM's part wouldn't have helped because even if mysteriously the enemy were suddenly replaced by school kids, they still would have kicked sand in our faces. We really were that bad. Of course it has become legendary in the group and still makes us laugh to this day, but it also led to some interesting twists in the overall plot as we then had to work out how to continue to pursue the quest in the light of the abject failure. A silver lining. Yeah. Sometimes there's nothing you can do. I will also address something I missed in Imaculata's post. Solid strategies. If the players come up with a great plan and turn a challenging encounter into an easy, or even trivial one, so be it. I'm not going to negate player effort and planning.

Thursday, 21st June, 2018

  • 03:07 PM - akr71 mentioned Imaculata in post Need input on a ship based mini adventure
    ...here they want to go next, so that I know what to prepare. Once they reach such a location, I sprinkle various interconnected mysteries around, along with some sight seeing / exploration. It is up to them which of the clues they follow up on, but I'll usually also have an npc approach them directly, to provide a quest hook. Sometimes there's even more than one npc that approaches them for a quest, although one quest may lead straight into the next. I'm not sure either. I probably have as many sessions to fill as I want, but I'm not sure how long I can go before they want to get back to civilization and the mainland. The ship is a convenient 'left-over' from the previous DM and I thought I could try some things I never get to do on land. I was planning on sprinkling some things to explore or ignore as they saw fit. None of the characters or players have any sailing experience, so anything on-board the ship other than combat leaves them as bystanders, which I would like to avoid. Imaculata - you posted your hooks while I was writing. Thanks! I'll take a look at those and see what I can work with.
  • 11:38 AM - pemerton mentioned Imaculata in post Everybody Cheats?
    ...nnaturally, for that goes contrary to the major precepts of the game. I'm not saying that Gygax's advice is the only way to do it, but I think it's noteworthy that he draws such a strong contrast between the GM making decisions that regulate the introduction of new challenges into play (eg by ignoring wandering monster dice) and the GM fudging action resolution results. There are lots and lots of games that put ”don’t cheat” explicitly in their game text. They go on to explain why it’s a problem and why it’s wholly unnecessary for that/those games (because they work without need for application of GM Force).Hm. I wonder if anyone can find me a quote reference of that from a game.Suggesting that certain GMing choices would go contrary to the major precepts of the game, and for that reason should not be done, comes well within cooee of what Manbearcat described. Here's another example, from Burning Wheel (Gold edition, p 30), which is directly relevant to the sort of example Imaculata gave: [W]hat happens after the dice have come to rest and the successes are counted? If the successes equal or exceed the obstacle, the character has succeeded in his goal—he achieved his intent and completed the task. This is important enough to say again: Characters who are successful complete actions in the manner described by the player. A successful roll is sacrosanct in Burning Wheel and neither GM nor other players can change the fact that the act was successful. The GM may only embellish or reinforce a successful ability test. Slightly less portentously, the Marvel Heroic RP rulebook (p OM8) says: In some games, the person who runs the game rolls the dice in secret - but there are no secrets in the Bullpen. Roll those bones in full view, Watchers!
  • 05:06 AM - Maxperson mentioned Imaculata in post Everybody Cheats?
    So you are making a legal appeal to the rules as written to suggest that "rulings not rules" means that the GM is inherently incapable of cheating? :confused: Since all rules are guidelines and the DM has full power to alter them at will, it's not cheating if he does. He's just using his given ability as DM. Rulings over rules is just a part of that authority. This would make an interesting poll. Officially can a DM cheat? The online definition of cheating: 1. act dishonestly or unfairly in order to gain an advantage. 2. avoid (something undesirable) by luck or skill. In (1), one might ask what advantage might the DM gain. Well DM's that act as the one described by @Imaculata tend to enjoy a DM-vs-player style and so there is room to say that cheating or fudging (whichever you prefer) provides an advantage to the DM in that roleplaying style. A few things. First, the DM is given an unfair advantage by the rules by virtue of being DM. He has the given ability to drop 10,000 monsters on a first level party if he wants. It's the DM's responsibility, though, to use that power wisely as bad DMs lose players fast. Second, I don't view what Imaculata is describing as a playstyle. Bad DMing is bad DMing, not a style of play. If a game devolves into DM vs. Player, the players lose. In (2), many DM's technically cheat or fudge to avoid undesirable outcomes for the table (whether it be to spare a PC or prolong an epic combat...etc). By that definition, everything you avoid that you don't like is cheating. Avoid eating a cheese sandwich that you dislike while at a party? Cheater!! Intercept a football headed for the end zone? Cheater!! Work hard to avoid...

Wednesday, 20th June, 2018

  • 02:39 PM - Sadras mentioned Imaculata in post Everybody Cheats?
    The DM is not cheating, though. He can't. Instead, he's being an asshat and bad DM. You respond to that by letting him know that you have better things to do and going elsewhere. The fact that the DM is given the authority to add, subtract or alter rules as he sees fit means that he literally cannot cheat. There's no rule for him to break. Rulings over rules and all that. It's messed up, but it's not cheating since he isn't breaking a rule. This would make an interesting poll. Officially can a DM cheat? The online definition of cheating: 1. act dishonestly or unfairly in order to gain an advantage. 2. avoid (something undesirable) by luck or skill. In (1), one might ask what advantage might the DM gain. Well DM's that act as the one described by @Imaculata tend to enjoy a DM-vs-player style and so there is room to say that cheating or fudging (whichever you prefer) provides an advantage to the DM in that roleplaying style. In (2), many DM's technically cheat or fudge to avoid undesirable outcomes for the table (whether it be to spare a PC or prolong an epic combat...etc). However having said all that, the DM has the power to change/amend any rule of the game AND at any time. So can he really cheat? I'm not really asking you Max, just musing and upping my post count. :) EDIT: Wait, I got it, CAN GOD CHEAT?

Tuesday, 29th May, 2018

  • 02:34 PM - iserith mentioned Imaculata in post Poison needle traps
    It just looks badly worded to me, perhaps an editing error, so it's up to you how it will ultimately function. It seems like the goal here is to set up a challenge of (1) finding the proper key or (2) disabling the trap then picking the lock. Anyone going straight to picking the lock is going to have a nasty surprise. That's how I'd handle it, anyway. I would also be sure to telegraph the existence of the trap in some way so that it isn't a "gotcha." @Imaculata: A passive check does not imply that the character is being passive. "Passive" refers to their being no roll, not that the character isn't performing a task. In fact, the rules state that such checks resolve a character performing a task repeatedly. Whether the DM uses a passive Investigation check to resolve this situation depends on what, specifically, the player described the character as doing.
  • 02:12 PM - Li Shenron mentioned Imaculata in post Poison needle traps
    A poisoned needle is hidden within a treasure chest’s lock, or in something else that a creature might open. Opening the chest without the proper key causes the needle to spring out, delivering a dose of poison. When the trap is triggered, the needle extends 3 inches straight out from the lock. A creature within range takes 1 piercing damage and 11 (2d10) poison damage, and must succeed on a DC 15 Constitution saving throw or be poisoned for 1 hour. A successful DC 20 Intelligence (Investigation) check allows a character to deduce the trap’s presence from alterations made to the lock to accommodate the needle. A successful DC 15 Dexterity check using thieves’ tools disarms the trap, removing the needle from the lock. Unsuccessfully attempting to pick the lock triggers the trap. Imaculata, how can you say the wording is "pretty clear"? :) It's not even clear whether the description here is for the trap only excluding the lock or if it is for trap and lock together. (CASE 1) If you assume the description is complete for the whole thing, then it sounds like you need only one check with thieves' tools for both disarming the trap and opening the lock, provided you first detect the trap. In this case the last sentence "Unsuccessfully attempting to pick the lock triggers the trap" suggests both checks are merged into one. If you instead don't detect the traps (your Investigation fails or you didn't ever think about it), you automatically trigger the trap, before you finish your lockpicking. After that, since the trap doesn't reset, you can continue without further danger, but you still need to make the DC15 lockpicking check. In this case the last sentence "Unsuccessfully attempting to pick the lock triggers the trap" is irrelevant because the trap is already spr...

Wednesday, 16th May, 2018

  • 01:48 PM - Coroc mentioned Imaculata in post Timelines in your Setting
    Imaculata The Thing with ancient Scenarios in the official Settings (FR Netheril, DL Ishtar, Eberron Giants vs Dragons, Greyhawk Twin Cataclysm, DS everything up till present :) ) is that it gives instant and believable Explanation for a lot of stuff: - Ruins aka dungeons - Unusual (powerful) Magic - Unusual Technology - Rifts (temporal, dimensional) - Forgotten cults - Ancient Villains rising again (not necessarily undead) etc. etc. It is not thought to be a fictionary history lesson in the first place but rather to consturct those bullets

Saturday, 21st April, 2018

  • 06:54 AM - pemerton mentioned Imaculata in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    ...the cabal called Jabal? It was established by way of an action declaration by the same player. How do we know that there are catacombs? Same answer. Why did I, as GM, describe the bazaar in Hardby as including a peddler trying to sell an angel feather? Because the same player had authored a Belief for his PC that said PC wouldn't leave Hardby without an item useful for confronting his balrog-possessed brother. Why did I, as GM, establish the feather as cursed? Because the player declared an attempt by his PC to read its aura, which failed - so the aura he read wasn't what he was hoping for! Why did I, as GM, establish that Jabal lives in a tower? Because the same player had authored an instict for his PC, cast Falconskin if I fall, and so it seemed appropriate to introduce a high place into the action. Etc. I think it is quite obvious that this is a different way of establishing setting, and a different approach to the role of setting in framing and in adjudication, from what Imaculata describes. Whether you want to label it "no myth", or "the standard narrativistic model" or simply "story now" doesn't seem that big a deal. (Strangely, the main poster who seems to want to argue this point has me blocked. Hence my lack of reply to that particular poster.)

Wednesday, 18th April, 2018

  • 12:41 PM - Coroc mentioned Imaculata in post Game of thrones setting
    Imaculata You mean Background in this case? And yes GoT is eventually better suited for roleplaying the politics than for recreating its epic combats, which are btw almost always mass combat Scenarios, there rarely are fights in Group size. Also there are not many nonhuman adversaries aka Monsters. Many combats are also very Environment specific, be it on ships, on the wall, sieges etc. there are few Special rules in 5th Edition so far to cover this..

Tuesday, 17th April, 2018

  • 12:21 PM - Hussar mentioned Imaculata in post Diagonal area of spells
    ...ategies are possible with magic. Sometimes my players come up with really weird ideas. "Can I use the Create Water spell, and then have my ally freeze it in mid air with a cold spell, to create a wall of ice?". "Sure" , I would reply, "What is the size of the area of water that the spell can produce?". I like that my players try to think outside what is literally written in the book, and be more creative. I WANT them to be this creative. And I try to be just as creative as them with my monsters, and how they use magic against the players. For me, it's needlessly mickey mouse. And, again, this is a proud nail thing for me, so, it's not entirely rational. :D But, think about it. You need to hit a point 50 feet away from you that is exactly 20 feet away from point A and 25 feet from point B. And the wizard can do it EVERY time. We don't allow fighters to do that. But, as soon as it's maaaaaaagic, then it's perfectly fine? Bugs me far more than it really should. Thing is, Imaculata, I'd agree with the idea of weird ideas. That's groovy. But, playing silly buggers because the grid creates pixelated circles, or "rotating" the cube so that it becomes a pin point smart spell just rubs me very much the wrong way.

Thursday, 12th April, 2018

  • 05:26 PM - pemerton mentioned Imaculata in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    The problem is in these threads this extreme is presented as why worldbuilding is bad but when presented with extremes on the other side of the spectrum (no worldbuilding) we get posters who then proceed to argue that either it doesn't happen that way in their game or we are arguing against their style in bad faith. This is certainly not accurate in relation to my posts. I've spelled out in some detail (mostly in replies to Imaculata) what I want in a RPG - for instance, that I want stuff like religous doctrine, dispositions of NPCs, details of what might be found where, etc to come out in the play of the game, rather than to be decided in advance of play by meta-level negotiation among the game participants. That's a reason why worldbuilding is "bad" for me (other than the sort of "high level" stuff I've talked about, like giving names to places and setting out some basic history to hang the genre tropes on). And this reason has nothing to do with whether someone is a good or bad GM. I'm talking about techniques for RPGing, not GM skill or good faith.

Tuesday, 16th January, 2018

  • 05:38 PM - Coroc mentioned Imaculata in post Oriental Adventures 5e: How would you do it?
    Yea now i did read Imaculata 's link - People cmon! It is about context!!! I would never call a present person of asian heritage an oriental. But medieval oriental adventures that is a total different thing. In fact if we stay with the official product line they took place in Kara Tur not in Orientalistan. Now that the Name Kara Tur is established you might use it, but still how does someone not familar with that FR sidekick campaign check out that he gets a ninja, samurai and dervish style campaign by the product name?
  • 11:00 AM - Sadras mentioned Imaculata in post The Best Movie About RPGs in 2018 (So Far)
    D&D thrives precisely because we're a part of it, and the meta-narrative of the players (not the characters) makes it so much more fun. For me, Jumanji demonstrated that the concept can definitely work. Agree very much with you and Imaculata on this. A little Stranger Things-type-style maybe needed with kids playing at a table and the audience gets sucked into the shared-fantasy, otherwise it becomes just another fantasy movie.

Friday, 12th January, 2018



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Monday, 18th February, 2019

  • 02:27 PM - Sadras quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    I do however use random dice rolls when determining what the players encounter while exploring. But I always give myself the freedom to ignore the outcome, if it doesn't seem fitting. I will add this, because I prefer not to fudge die rolls I'm more likely to go into yes or no territory. Although even with die rolls one has the option of yes but complication or no but clue (fail forward) and this DM adjudication may often be influenced by pacing and plausibility.

Friday, 15th February, 2019

  • 09:46 PM - Dyson Logos quoted Imaculata in post I draw the occasional D&D map
    Can one of your next maps perhaps include lots of height differences? Balconies, bridges and the like? I think those types of dungeon designs we also don't see enough of around here. That's actually something that I'm generally well known for - while most people think of my maps because of the hatching, I use a lot of elevation changes to make them feel more 3D. If you've seen the maps in Dragon Heist you can see what I mean.

Wednesday, 13th February, 2019

  • 02:17 PM - Maxperson quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    There are systems that allow simultaneous combat resolution just fine, and are faster than D&D. Like the game Crossfire for example, which simulates WWII era battles. I just looked at those rules, and while they are better than D&D at combat realism, it's still not really simultaneous combat. If your side rolls badly, the other side can keep moving and moving before you get to move. The reactive fire helps try and minimize that, though.

Saturday, 9th February, 2019

  • 04:07 AM - pemerton quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    It does not need to make sense. It is merely a means of scaling up the combat difficulty of a tough monster.I've got no objection to scaling. What makes no sense to me is that attempt to overlay the veneer of simulation - by calling the upscaling "natural armour" rather than (say) a level bonus. I appreciate that not everyone has these issues with 3E - it's quite a popular system. But they are significnat contributors to my dislike of it.

Friday, 8th February, 2019

  • 09:11 PM - Eltab quoted Imaculata in post Yet another Ghostbusters movie
    to deflect genuine criticism of the movie. In the original thread on the most recent GB movie, I predicted it would not be as good as the original, based on the cast working together before (or not). My comment disappeared without a trace or reply.

Thursday, 7th February, 2019

  • 01:20 PM - pemerton quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    As I understand it, natural armor is not only the material, but also the thickness of a creature's tough skin, as well as a way to balance its difficulty. But I don't think it was meant to give 'a veneer of simulation' at all. It's part of 3rd edition's armor mechanic, and that's it. Why do you need to make an exact call about what it is? Does it change anything about the gameplay?Why can a mage or godling not forge armour that is as tough as the "natural" hide of a dragon? This is possible in AD&D, and in 4e, but not in 3E. What is going on with dragons in the fiction of that edition? To me it makes no sense at all.

Wednesday, 6th February, 2019

  • 02:37 PM - Aldarc quoted Imaculata in post Hidden
  • 02:20 PM - Maxperson quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Max has a habit of making commonly understood terms so broad, that they lose a lot of their discussion-value, and this keeps coming up again and again in lots of discussions on this board. Perhaps it would be more constructive to stick with the convential way in which the term is used, Max? I think you (Max) know that when we use the word realism, we are referring to a style of play that mimics real life in more detail then conventional modes of play. So maybe it would help, for the sake of discussion, to use this commonly understood definition instead, and continue from there? I am using it in the way it's commonly used. Aldarc seems to be intentionally minimizing realism in order to win a point, so I demonstrated the importance of realism in RPGs in the hope that he would at least acknowledge that realism has more meaning than "pocket lint." Alas, he seems to be one of those who would rather stick his head in the sand and sing la la la, than to admit when he is wrong about something. ...

Tuesday, 5th February, 2019

  • 02:26 PM - Maxperson quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    This doesn't mean that I am above moving bits of plot directly in the players path, in fact, I do that all the time. As long as something has not been revealed by me, it could be anywhere really. But it has to make sense. If all the clues point towards the sect hiding underneath the old opera house, I shouldn't be moving them to the teahouse, just because that's where the players decide to go. Instead, I should be coming up with something interesting they find there, and possibly something to help them get back on the right track. Yep. They could see Enrico Palazzo sitting at a table with another opera member and overhear them complaining about seeing odd people at the opera lately.
  • 12:53 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    But whether the teahouse is actually a location where the players may run into members of this sect, is a whole different matter. I could allow the players to visit the teahouse and still rule that no members of the sect are present. As a DM I am not (always) well-served to just put the sect-members whereever the players decide to go. In fact, I think this is a pretty bad idea. . This is an important point. When I am playing a game like this, I want to feel like I am exploring a place and being rewarded for making sound choices. If there is no good reason for me to believe they are at the tea house, and they are just there because that is where I go looking for them, that is all a bit quantum ogre to me. I don't care as a player if they are there or not, I care that the GM is actually thinking about whether they should be there, and not just having it be so because that is where I went. And I am not saying this is the only way to do it, the best, or even the most popular way. I am just sa...

Monday, 4th February, 2019

  • 05:21 PM - Retreater quoted Imaculata in post Narrative Dungeons
    What I tend to do when designing my dungeons, is create a list of various 'dungeon details' that I can randomly insert anywhere, at any point. These may include a fresco on a wall, a particular painting or statue, etc. I use these to fill gaps where nothing of interest seems to be happening. These details don't really rely on a specific location, but can contain plot-relevant information that is of use to the players. It adds an extra narrative layer to the way a dungeon plays out. Now instead of having some empty tunnel with non-descript walls, you have a tunnel with some sort of mysterious wall carving, that provides lore to the dungeon (or the campaign itself). I'm using Raging Swan Press's "GM's Miscellany: Dungeon Dressing" to add some of those little details. It's a solid book, as are Urban and Wilderness Dressing.
  • 03:21 PM - Umbran quoted Imaculata in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    I'm not sure if I've ever played in a group that plays this way. In all of the games I have played, or been the DM for, the DM already has an idea what is at the teahouse. "An idea," is not, "the life story of every person within." An idea may not even be knowing how many people are actually there at any given time. The typical RPG "an idea" is a listing of the people who the GM thinks is important at the time they wrote it. If they wrote it. Many is the time when the procedure is more like, "Hm. We want to find members of this sect. Where are they likely to hang out? In this culture... maybe a teahouse? Hey, GM, we go look for a teahouse to see if we can find some members of this sect!" And, this idea is *entirely reasonable*, but the GM didn't think of it beforehand, and so there is no teahouse detailed in the campaign setting, though there are plenty of them implied. The GM has the choice of winging it, or shooting down a reasonable idea because they didn't think of it. ...
  • 12:59 PM - Caliburn101 quoted Imaculata in post Narrative Dungeons
    What I tend to do when designing my dungeons, is create a list of various 'dungeon details' that I can randomly insert anywhere, at any point. These may include a fresco on a wall, a particular painting or statue, etc. I use these to fill gaps where nothing of interest seems to be happening. These details don't really rely on a specific location, but can contain plot-relevant information that is of use to the players. It adds an extra narrative layer to the way a dungeon plays out. Now instead of having some empty tunnel with non-descript walls, you have a tunnel with some sort of mysterious wall carving, that provides lore to the dungeon (or the campaign itself). Corridors don't have to be boring... ;P 104539

Friday, 1st February, 2019


Thursday, 31st January, 2019

  • 03:44 PM - dragoner quoted Imaculata in post What are the biggest RPG crimes?
    Plus, she didn't even dress up in evil cult robes, like a normal D&D player does. Put some effort in! (It's kind of bad that I actually get this reference.) Everyone can get it now: https://www.chick.com/products/tract?stk=0046 Though interestingly enough, if one searches for it, it is listed as: Dark Dungeons is possibly the most widely distributed piece of anti-game propaganda in the history of gaming. By the Escapist.

Wednesday, 30th January, 2019

  • 05:08 PM - Ralif Redhammer quoted Imaculata in post What are the biggest RPG crimes?
    Yep, that drives me up a wall, too. In my one larger group, I really need to be better at managing that. While it may not be the worst 'crime', what really annoys me (and pops up often), is one player blocking the action of another player. For example, one player wants to search a desk, and the rogue in the party immediately declares "I search it too!", or "Let me search it, my search skill is higher than yours!". Just let a player do their own thing. If you want to search something so badly, search somewhere else. And don't copy another player's action because you think you can do it better, please.

Monday, 28th January, 2019

  • 07:03 PM - billd91 quoted Imaculata in post Yet another Ghostbusters movie
    I'm not sure if I agree. I'd argue that those afore mentioned things were always wrong, regardless of the changing social mores. Depends. Some things may be always wrong, but the interpretation of a situation may depend on a certain cultural assumption that has changed over time. It's how you get from "Baby, It's Cold Outside" from being an Oscar-winning song written and originally performed as banter to being considered date-rapey. Same, probably, with Venkman's thorazine which may have shifted from being assumed to be for personal recreation to, again, being date-rapey.
  • 01:49 PM - trappedslider quoted Imaculata in post Yet another Ghostbusters movie
    That has always been one of the weirdest throw away lines in the film to me. I just figured he went to a pharmacy or had it delivered..he has Ph.D.s in both parapsychology and psychology. Also Thorazine was prescribed by doctors as a sedative for anxiety and sleeplessness. And her room looks ransacked...so she could have had it and the dosage was just a goof....also The official Richard Mueller novelization describes him hunting around in her apartment for medical supplies. Quite why she has powerful sedatives on hand isn't explained in any detail although someone who lives in "spook central" could feasibly be suffering from insomnia, hearing voices, mild paranoia or migraines, all of which are treatable with Thorazine: Dana Barrett still floated above the bed while Peter Venkman rummaged through the drawers of her dresser. "She’s an artist", he thought. "She’s got to have some Valium somewhere." It's worth noting that Louis was buying painkillers by the bucketload to deal with his ...

Friday, 25th January, 2019

  • 04:25 PM - Umbran quoted Imaculata in post Yet another Ghostbusters movie
    I'm not sure if I agree. I'd argue that those afore mentioned things were always wrong, regardless of the changing social mores. Here's the simple question to ask - did women of the time *enjoy* being treated like that? If not, it wasn't okay. Hint: No, they didn't enjoy it at the time.


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