View Profile: pauldanieljohnson - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
No Recent Activity
About pauldanieljohnson

Basic Information

About pauldanieljohnson
Introduction:
D&D DM, player, and designer
Location:
Edmonton
Disable sharing sidebar?:
No
Sex:
Male
Age Group:
Over 40
My Game Details

Details of games currently playing and games being sought.

Country:
Canada

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
30
Posts Per Day
0.04
Last Post
Worlds of Design: What Game Designers Need to Know About IP Today 04:58 AM

Currency

Gold Pieces
5
General Information
Last Activity
Today 06:03 AM
Join Date
Monday, 9th January, 2017
Product Reviews & Ratings
Reviews Written
0
My Game Details
Country:
Canada

Tuesday, 19th February, 2019


Monday, 11th February, 2019


No results to display...
No results to display...

Tuesday, 19th February, 2019

  • 10:02 PM - Charles Dunwoody quoted pauldanieljohnson in post The Forlorn North Adventure Path for D&D and DCC RPG
    I believe that's correct. This is a good idea, though, despite requiring the DM to do a bit of conversion. I did something similar a year or two ago with classic D&D modules. We started off with Against the Cult of the Reptile God, then Isle of Dread, Ravenloft, the Desert of Desolation trilogy, Death's Ride, and Earthshaker!. It's a fun way to give modern players a chance to experience old modules, and as a DM it's fun to find ways to string separate plots together into a cohesive campaign. Sounds like you had a heck of a campaign. And I agree. Lots of modules work with 5E. DCC is a bit easier in some ways because it shares many design choices with D&D 5E. But the old stuff isn't too hard to convert either.

Monday, 11th February, 2019

  • 10:53 PM - Mike Myler quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Mythological Figures: Tarzan (5E)
    I haven't read them in decades myself, but when I did, it was often. Not saying you shouldn't do this, just that a warning that they aren't going to be the way fans of the characters remember them might be in order. If you look there's always somebody wanting Thor to have a natural Strength of 27 or whatever. There's usually something useful mentioned though (Tarzan's dad's knife for example!) so I've resisted the urge to include a RAW disclaimer just yet. I'm thinking chaotic good instead of neutral good. He had a specific distaste for civilization and the laws of man. Awesome conversion, though; that's about as close as you could get with RAW. I wasn't sure if you'd go barbarian or beast master ranger, but barbarian works. I went with neutral good because from what I could remember he's a super naturalist with a good-heart. Not necessarily rebellious or spontaneous really, just a "this is the way the world is naturally so that's how I live my life." There's definitely a good argument for...

Saturday, 2nd February, 2019

  • 10:51 AM - Lanefan quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Dragon Reflections #19 – Battle of the Cons
    The tournament write-up is an enjoyable read. The party in question had a philosophy that can be summed up as 'kill everything, then cast speak with dead on the corpses to find out why we needed to kill them in the first place".Kill 'em all and let Speak With Dead sort 'em out - yeah, works for me. :)

Monday, 28th January, 2019

  • 09:15 PM - talien quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Blockchain and RPGs: When Fantasy Meets (Digital) Reality
    Interesting article, although I wonder how likely it is blockchain-style technology would be used in RPGs on any sort of wide-scale implementation. That tech is intended to ensure security and uniqueness, implying that the underlying asset is (a) unique and (b) requiring of some sort of security. That might be true for some instances, such as competitive play, but I'd suggest that in the overwhelming majority of cases, you can whip up any sort of character imaginable for free at any time: Being free means that security is largely irrelevant, and there's no need for uniqueness - if someone on the next block over (or the next continent over) has a similar or identical character, it really doesn't matter. Right! To that point, it's really what the motivation to have a "secure" virtual object is. As the examples I think illustrate, money is usually that factor -- which is where competitive play/esports potentially becomes that motivation. What gets interesting is if that extra layer of security makes it fe...

Monday, 21st January, 2019

  • 09:43 PM - Aiden_Keller_ quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Epic Monsters: Loch Ness Monster (5E)
    There's something very cool and paradoxical about the artwork for a monster actually showing the monster being eaten by a different monster. Imagine if the whole Monster Manual was illustrated that way? I'm not sure what you'd show eating the Tarrasque, but otherwise it would be cool. We would know what creatures hunt others...we could have parties come across one monster fighting another and they decide to intervene and pick them both off or slowing walk away...
  • 08:38 PM - dave2008 quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Epic Monsters: Loch Ness Monster (5E)
    There's something very cool and paradoxical about the artwork for a monster actually showing the monster being eaten by a different monster. Imagine if the whole Monster Manual was illustrated that way? I'm not sure what you'd show eating the Tarrasque, but otherwise it would be cool. Well the artwork is one I've seen in old dinosaurs books. The claim was that it was an old drawing of a mosasaur and plesiosaur fighting with a pterosaur in the sky. However, I had never noticed the people before until it was posted here. So now I am not sure what the origin is!

Friday, 11th January, 2019


Friday, 4th January, 2019

  • 09:03 PM - Umbran quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: “Old School” in RPGs and other Games – Part 1 Failure and Story
    Another consideration is that many, if not most, of those old school adventures essentially were railroads in disguise. Well, consider that several/many classic "old school" adventures started as tournament modules. In tournament play, you really need all the competitors going though the same basic experience in order to have comparable scoring - they pretty much have to be railroads.
  • 08:59 PM - AriochQ quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: “Old School” in RPGs and other Games – Part 1 Failure and Story
    Another consideration is that many, if not most, of those old school adventures essentially were railroads in disguise. If you dump the PCs into a dungeon, you're severely restricting their options, just with stone walls and locked doors rather than heavy-handed plot elements. I recall reading that the exact reason EGG put players in a dungeon was to limit their options and make the game more manageable. (I think it was mentioned in Playing at the World by Peterson). I think Sandbox v. Railroad is another false dichotomy. It is a continuum, not a binary choice. Character options are always limited by something, be it a pre-published adventure path or the DM's imagination. The degree to which they are limited is what matters. At some point, lack of choices takes the fun out of the game. Most DM's strive to both give the characters the freedom to make meaning choices and keep them from straying too far off the adventure path. It is rare to run into real sandbox style play (where the characters ha...

Saturday, 29th December, 2018

  • 02:31 AM - Lanefan quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: When There's Too Many Magic Items
    Tell that to the guy who doesn't have a magic sword. Actually, climb into a DM's seat and tell Player B his fighter doesn't get a magic sword even though Player A's fighter got one.Who made that decision, though? Yeah, that's right - Player A and Player B (and probably the rest of the players were involved too). Treasure division is purely a player/PC-driven thing, and thus the DM has nothing to do with telling Player B his fighter doesn't get a magic sword other than only putting one* in the adventure to be found. * - and even then the DM might not be to blame, if she had in fact placed two swords and the PCs missed one... Where it becomes a problem is when magic items have no pre-determined or game-state monetary value, thus providing no viable way to equalize Player B's PC treasury share for not getting the sword. This alone is enough reason for any system to incorporate magic item pricing.
  • 12:00 AM - jmucchiello quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: When There's Too Many Magic Items
    Tell that to the guy who doesn't have a magic sword. Actually, climb into a DM's seat and tell Player B his fighter doesn't get a magic sword even though Player A's fighter got one. I've never had a problem with this. The other player shining bright does not diminish my light. A +1 sword will mean the other player hits 5% more often doing +1 hp of damage. If that really unbalances his effectiveness to the point that I feel useless, there is something else wrong and magic sword won't help it. There's no I in party.

Friday, 28th December, 2018

  • 09:35 PM - Morrus quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Self Publishing: What's An Artist Worth?
    A However, in my experience, publishing gaming material is almost never profitable enough to be anything other than a hobby, and you'd be very lucky to make back in revenue the amount you spend on professional art. Sure you can. You just have to use the right tools, like Kickstarter!
  • 09:33 PM - Saelorn quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: When There's Too Many Magic Items
    Tell that to the guy who doesn't have a magic sword. Actually, climb into a DM's seat and tell Player B his fighter doesn't get a magic sword even though Player A's fighter got one.Why do you have two fighters in the same party who both use swords? If you're running a game where magic items are sufficiently rare that this is likely to happen, then you should probably let the players know before the game starts, so they can avoid creating such an obvious conflict. Life isn't fair, but because this is a game, we can contrive that things will mostly not be fair toward villains and monsters. A mighty hero should be able to wade through hordes of evil opposition, at least partly in thanks to their superior equipment. Magic swords are important to the genre. Don't take that away from the players.
  • 09:29 PM - Jay Verkuilen quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: When There's Too Many Magic Items
    Is this a real article, or did someone write an outline and publish it by accident? As odd as the posts can be, they usually spark some good discussion. In any event, the problem should be solved with magic item design. There never should have been such a thing as a "+1 sword" to begin with: Either the +1 is necessary to stay on the proper power curve, in which case that math should be built into the class's attack mechanics already, or else the +1 is not necessary to stay on the power curve and it shouldn't exist because it imbalances the game. In D&D long ago magic weapons really did represent qualitative shifts in the PC due to the fact that there were many monsters that couldn't be hit by non-magic weapons at all. So they were really, really valuable. Good magic item design evokes the feel of the memorable elements of classic fantasy, like the One Ring or Stormbringer. (I wonder what would happen if you wore the One Ring while wielding Stormbringer?) The point is, these aren't magic items ...
  • 09:16 PM - Jay Verkuilen quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: When There's Too Many Magic Items
    Tell that to the guy who doesn't have a magic sword. Actually, climb into a DM's seat and tell Player B his fighter doesn't get a magic sword even though Player A's fighter got one. Right, and I think this pretty much nails a lot of issues: Much of what causes problems isn't really regarding the setting at all. A game where one PC grossly outshines the others will often be problematic for "'round the table" issues.
  • 08:57 PM - Saelorn quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Worlds of Design: When There's Too Many Magic Items
    In any event, the problem should be solved with magic item design. There never should have been such a thing as a "+1 sword" to begin with: Either the +1 is necessary to stay on the proper power curve, in which case that math should be built into the class's attack mechanics already, or else the +1 is not necessary to stay on the power curve and it shouldn't exist because it imbalances the game.YMMV, I suppose, but I believe that a magical sword should be better than a non-magical sword. Whether or not you can figure out how to balance it from a game perspective, it's necessary for traditional fantasy settings. There's absolutely nothing wrong with a setting where some people have magical swords and others don't, and where having the better sword gives a substantive advantage. And if the sword is going to help you in some way, then it absolutely makes sense for that to come in the form of increased accuracy and/or damage. A sword that lets you fly, or deflect fireballs, may be more powerful and more ...

Tuesday, 10th January, 2017

  • 04:09 AM - Ilbranteloth quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Tales From The Yawning Portal - 7 Classic Dungeons Updated To 5E!
    True. I've done conversions on several, including Against the Cult of the Reptile God and the Desert of Desolation series, but I find that my prep time is already long enough without needing the extra work. Desert of Desolation is one of my favorite series. Just used parts of it again. Is your conversion on DMsGuild?
  • 01:15 AM - jagerfury quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Tales From The Yawning Portal - 7 Classic Dungeons Updated To 5E!
    I really miss the old paperback adventure module format. I wish WoTC would have some staffers doing nothing but releasing old modules converted to 5e. Keeping the original art, too. Classic Modules Today is a website with a list of 5e conversion guides for 1e modules available at DM's Guild. They require the original module, but WotC is releasing these old school modules as POD products slowly but surely. So you don't get the whole module redone in 5e, but the conversion guide does do the heavy lifting for you when you have the original module in hand.

Monday, 9th January, 2017

  • 10:21 PM - BookBarbarian quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Tales From The Yawning Portal - 7 Classic Dungeons Updated To 5E!
    I really miss the old paperback adventure module format. I wish WoTC would have some staffers doing nothing but releasing old modules converted to 5e. Keeping the original art, too. But, but, but why would you buy something like that when you can convert it yourself??? :-P I kid, I kid. I can see why some would rather save their money and convert to 5e themselves, and why some would rather pay someone else to covert for them.
  • 10:05 PM - dropbear8mybaby quoted pauldanieljohnson in post Unearthed Arcana Introduces The Artifcer
    I'm unconvinced. For low-magic campaigns, this class is problematic, and given the power curve in 5e, I see a lot of campaigns going low-magic. I have what I consider to be an ingenious, nay brilliant, conception for a solution to this most heinous of problematicisms! Don't allow it in a low magic campaign.

pauldanieljohnson's Downloads

  Filename Total Downloads Rating Files Uploaded Last Updated

Most Recent Favorite Generators/Tables

View All Favorites