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    Thursday, 6th December, 2018, 01:51 AM
    I'd agree with the first at least, with the problem. However, from what I remember of the 1st and 2nd Edition Dragonlance books, along with the novels, Kender were typically described as being like Tasslehoff, especially as first introduced. He ends up being more introspective and serious as the books progress due to his experiences. My main problem with them is by design and by my experience...
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  • lluewhyn's Avatar
    Wednesday, 5th December, 2018, 09:38 PM
    Anyone wanting to play a kender in any game of mine, even it was Dragonlance, would find that character dying in a fire. Exponentially more disruptive than the average evil character. Ok character for a novel, trash concept for a cooperative gaming experience. On a more serious tone, I voted 5 myself. I'm happy to work with most character concepts and tend to run more episodic games, but I...
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  • lluewhyn's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th December, 2018, 07:23 PM
    That thought occurred to me as well, especially the "Head of Vecna" gag, along with it being a very weak idea for a joke. That requires a specific level of knowledge/Ignorance on the PCs' parts, i.e. A. Somehow doing something with a dead person's body part to swap out with your own could give you great power, in this case attuning with it, B. Being ignorant of how risky this is to do with random...
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  • lluewhyn's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th December, 2018, 07:17 PM
    Sounds like a good idea. That actually gives some greater purpose to the item and ensures that it might come off as having a point to the PCs (if they pay attention to it, if not, that's up to them).
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  • lluewhyn's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th December, 2018, 04:40 PM
    I find it funny that the old example at the top of the Too Awesome to Use TV Tropes page is of a JRPG game where they're hesitant to use a Megalixer even though half their party is dead, even though a Megalixer wouldn't work in that situation (doesn't revive downed players). I myself am of this tendency, and would often end many of the Bioware D&D games with stacks of scrolls and potions that...
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  • lluewhyn's Avatar
    Monday, 3rd December, 2018, 06:46 PM
    I'm not quite understanding the purpose of this item in the dungeon. Is it just an elaborate, poorly developed attempt to pull a "Gotcha!" on the PCs by killing someone who does a silly thing? Do many PCs normally attempt to attune to unidentified random body parts? Based on the fact that there's a second encounter which references the heart and points the PCs back there, it feels like there...
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About lluewhyn

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Campaign Settings and DM Strictures, the POLL Thursday, 6th December, 2018 01:51 AM

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Wednesday, 5th December, 2018

  • 10:35 PM - Jester David quoted lluewhyn in post Campaign Settings and DM Strictures, the POLL
    Anyone wanting to play a kender in any game of mine, even it was Dragonlance, would find that character dying in a fire. Exponentially more disruptive than the average evil character. Ok character for a novel, trash concept for a cooperative gaming experience. On a more serious tone, I voted 5 myself. I'm happy to work with most character concepts and tend to run more episodic games, but I reserve the right to enforce changes for game balance, whether it be for rules or role-playing reasons, and my players understand that. Usually it's by lifting someone up rather than nerfing someone down, but exceptions could occur. I have one of my long-time players who still today talks about his 3.5 Sorcerer "accidentally" failing a save (he could have done something to mitigate it, but chose not to) because he felt that his character was vastly overshadowing everyone else at the table. If someone wants to play something questionable, but can pitch it to me how it won't be a disruption to the other p...

Tuesday, 30th October, 2018

  • 04:35 PM - billd91 quoted lluewhyn in post 5E's "Missed Opportunities?"
    You're welcome. The idea behind not putting in any official "magic shoppe" rules is so magic can be left somewhat rare and mysterious if desired, but then they never really came up with a good replacement for what to actually do with all of this fancy loot then, especially if you're running a somewhat episodic mode of table-top where the players show up each week to RP characters who go out adventuring as opposed to settling down like I mentioned previously. The issue with magic shoppes with more or less on-demand items isn't simply that magic is no longer rare and mysterious - it warps how characters are equipped. Quirky, sometimes-useful items get sold for the ol', reliable Big 6 (or their closest equivalents in 5e). It didn't help that too many of the multi-function items in 3e were overpriced to exacerbate that problem. That ended up being a much bigger change to the way D&D was played when considering the evolution of the game from 1e through 3e than, I think, anybody expected.
  • 01:43 PM - CapnZapp quoted lluewhyn in post 5E's "Missed Opportunities?"
    That is one of my issues with the edition. You can get all kinds of money, but then the DM needs to find out uses for it, because there's little to buy past 2nd or 3rd level. Sure, for a simulationist campaign where you're building your own keep, refurbishing an ancient cathedral, you can come up with solutions, but that doesn't work well with adventuring based campaigns where you have little down time. Thank you. I have said so since 2015.

Monday, 29th October, 2018

  • 10:42 PM - Lanefan quoted lluewhyn in post 5E's "Missed Opportunities?"
    That is one of my issues with the edition. You can get all kinds of money, but then the DM needs to find out uses for it, because there's little to buy past 2nd or 3rd level. Sure, for a simulationist campaign where you're building your own keep, refurbishing an ancient cathedral, you can come up with solutions, but that doesn't work well with adventuring based campaigns where you have little down time. Monthly living expenses is a decent idea, but once again it works better in campaigns where PCs have a more set timeline than one where they're constantly haring off after some trouble or another. Been a problem since the beginning, because the game was based off stories like Conan/Fafhrd & Grey Mouser where the protagonists were chasing after all kinds of wealth and conveniently spent it all on drinking/whoring between adventures as a narrative conceit. Harder to do when the players choose not to do that and an ale is 3 cp, and they've got 3,000 gp.Training expenses. They need to train fo...

Sunday, 21st October, 2018

  • 03:28 AM - Elfcrusher quoted lluewhyn in post Ideas for Improving Inspiration
    We just use it as you suggested, as a reroll instead of a double roll. No one was *ever* using it before. Now, people are still forgetting about it, but at least they are occasionally using it. Yeah, I think one of the reasons people forget about it is that you keep "saving" it for a super important roll, and then you eventually forget. When you use the re-roll method, players tend to use it on the first semi-important miss. It keeps the mechanic more in the front of your mind.

Friday, 30th June, 2017

  • 05:27 PM - Triumph_Fork quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    So, are people using special rules for fleeing not in the actual books? Yes and no Fleeing is a tactial and viable option for PC's Fleeing is a tactic. Lets say your party takes on 6 encounters after resting and you come across the DM's favourite boss. The DM knows that some PC's will die, just because the party's resources are almost exhausted. Unless the players are really lucky with Crits and if the monster(s) are unlucky, survival may be out of the question. Then, it's best to run. Players don't always know when to flee Problem is though, people get into the mindset: "I'm an adventurer, slaying 2 ancient red dragons is a piece of cake!", even though it isn't. The DM knows this... One way to get the players to know they're over their heads is through an NPC or player who can roll an intelligence check. "Guys, I think we've gone too far into the volcano!" should be enough to tell the party to that they shouldn't have stolen their dragon eggs to begin with! Villains enjoy player'...

Monday, 19th June, 2017

  • 03:30 PM - jasper quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    Recently saw another of those memes discussing "never assume that everything in the world is an appropriate challenge for your level -be prepared to flee". This kind of philosophy has always seemed odd to me, because IMO every edition of D&D has made fleeing/running a sucker's move if you go only by the written rules. Basically, two problems: 1. Unless you have fought specific types of creatures before, you don't know their relative challenge level until you fight them (still doesn't help much against specific creatures). Even if you fight them, you might not be able to gauge their true difficulty if the DM is opaque about their exact stats (HP, Attack Bonus, AC, etc.) until it's several rounds in and party members are dropping. Did that guy who hit you with a 25 (not-critical) have a +6 and roll a 19, or did he roll a 13 with a +12? A PC's first few attack rolls are 23 and 24, which are both hits, so couldn't tell the enemy has a whopping 22 AC. Also, half of your team is down and that Ogre...
  • 11:38 AM - transtemporal quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    But for everyone else, how do you resolve the dilemma that it's very hard to determine the difficulty of an opponent until you engage them in combat, and once you are in combat with them it's hard to flee without them following or using ranged attacks to bring you down? I don't really see what the problem is. The DM isn't obliged to give you the encounter rating. You have to determine for yourself whether you think you can beat an enemy, or not. That's part of the fun. If you don't think you can, run or don't start the fight in the first place. Our group has done this twice. Once from a rampaging adult black dragon (not sure why we thought we could beat it at 3rd level) and once from a tribe of gnolls (we blindly ran into their lair and got surrounded). For the dragon we ran through the tunnels it couldn't fit through til we got out of its lair, then hid in the swamp. With the gnolls, we made a hole in their ranks then ran (thankfully we had an exit strategy there, invisibility and/or ga...
  • 11:22 AM - Psikerlord# quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    Recently saw another of those memes discussing "never assume that everything in the world is an appropriate challenge for your level -be prepared to flee". This kind of philosophy has always seemed odd to me, because IMO every edition of D&D has made fleeing/running a sucker's move if you go only by the written rules. Basically, two problems: 1. Unless you have fought specific types of creatures before, you don't know their relative challenge level until you fight them (still doesn't help much against specific creatures). Even if you fight them, you might not be able to gauge their true difficulty if the DM is opaque about their exact stats (HP, Attack Bonus, AC, etc.) until it's several rounds in and party members are dropping. Did that guy who hit you with a 25 (not-critical) have a +6 and roll a 19, or did he roll a 13 with a +12? A PC's first few attack rolls are 23 and 24, which are both hits, so couldn't tell the enemy has a whopping 22 AC. Also, half of your team is down and that Ogre...
  • 08:53 AM - Li Shenron quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    But for everyone else, how do you resolve the dilemma that it's very hard to determine the difficulty of an opponent until you engage them in combat, and once you are in combat with them it's hard to flee without them following or using ranged attacks to bring you down? 1. I have no problem giving hints to the players such as "this foe looks hard to kill" or "this foe looks really beyond your league". I could also flat-out tell them what is the monster's CR, but you can put that behind an Intelligence check if you don't want it to feel too much of a cheat. 2. Because they don't want to. If you were attacked by someone in the street, then punch him hard in the face, and he would start fleeing, would you go after him? You've already won and got what you wanted, why would you risk? Sometimes, the defendants would be motivated to counterattack, and some other times they would not. There isn't a "must do" in every case. For instance, if the defendants are guarding a place, they would be very f...
  • 04:21 AM - Quickleaf quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    Recently saw another of those memes discussing "never assume that everything in the world is an appropriate challenge for your level -be prepared to flee". This kind of philosophy has always seemed odd to me, because IMO every edition of D&D has made fleeing/running a sucker's move if you go only by the written rules. Basically, two problems: 1. Unless you have fought specific types of creatures before, you don't know their relative challenge level until you fight them (still doesn't help much against specific creatures). Even if you fight them, you might not be able to gauge their true difficulty if the DM is opaque about their exact stats (HP, Attack Bonus, AC, etc.) until it's several rounds in and party members are dropping. Did that guy who hit you with a 25 (not-critical) have a +6 and roll a 19, or did he roll a 13 with a +12? A PC's first few attack rolls are 23 and 24, which are both hits, so couldn't tell the enemy has a whopping 22 AC. Also, half of your team is down and that Ogre...
  • 03:51 AM - Saeviomagy quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    1. Unless you have fought specific types of creatures before, you don't know their relative challenge level until you fight them (still doesn't help much against specific creatures). Even if you fight them, you might not be able to gauge their true difficulty if the DM is opaque about their exact stats (HP, Attack Bonus, AC, etc.) until it's several rounds in and party members are dropping. Did that guy who hit you with a 25 (not-critical) have a +6 and roll a 19, or did he roll a 13 with a +12? A PC's first few attack rolls are 23 and 24, which are both hits, so couldn't tell the enemy has a whopping 22 AC. Also, half of your team is down and that Ogre hits like a train -but is the 40 points of damage that you have done to him almost enough to drop him or merely a small dent? It's the DMs job to NOT be opaque. The guy hits you with a 25 ac? If he needed a 19, then he 'only just caught you with...' if he rolled a 13, he 'struck you with relative ease'. I also just straight out tell players AC ...
  • 02:19 AM - Blue quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    1. Unless you have fought specific types of creatures before, you don't know their relative challenge level until you fight them (still doesn't help much against specific creatures). If that's the case, I'd ask the DM to step up on their descriptions. Your characters have a sense of how powerful they are, they have a history of battle probably as long as your game has been running, they should be able to do some estimation. "While humanoid and more than twice as tall as you, their proportions are off. They seem almost painfully thin, until you realize that their arm is still twice as thick as your thigh. They move with an awkward gait but idly limber tree trunks over their shoulders as impromptu clubs. Their skin is green and rubbery, and under coarse black hair their eyes gleam with low cunning." "Do I think I could take one in single combat?" "Well, from how they lurch it shouldn't be a problem to hit one. Be hit is a different question. You've fought ogres, but they wouldn't even c...
  • 02:08 AM - Lanefan quoted lluewhyn in post Fleeing
    But that seems to be the exception to me- that PCs can determine it's time to run and still have an opportunity for all of them to get away, when more typically it's just the few survivors from a total wipe.All you need is at least one survivor to allow for the party (and the ongoing campaign) to continue. And nobody ever said anything about "all of them" getting away. There are acceptable losses. :) But I've seen so many people talking about games where their PCs learned the value of running away from fights and not thinking they can take everything down when it seems to me the default system mechanics tend to discourage this option, not just PC cockiness.System mechanics or not, oftentimes fleeing won't necessarily draw a pursuit. Think about it - usually when a party gets in over its head it's due to having stuck their collective nose where it doesn't belong - often into the lair of something big and nasty. The big nasty thing quite reasonably defends its home, kills a few of the intru...

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