View Profile: Nathaniel Lee - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
No Recent Activity
About Nathaniel Lee

Basic Information

Date of Birth
November 30

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
43
Posts Per Day
0.11
Last Post
Another Look at the D&D Essentials Kit Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019 03:55 AM

Currency

Gold Pieces
0
General Information
Last Activity
Today 06:29 AM
Join Date
Sunday, 15th April, 2018
Product Reviews & Ratings
Reviews Written
0

Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019


No results to display...
No results to display...

Tuesday, 19th February, 2019

  • 11:41 PM - Saelorn quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Epic Monsters: Cerberus (5E)
    It's not really a convention, though, if only an extreme minority of the relevant population knows about it and/or cares to use it. This really sounds like you having heard a term being used, having adopted it for yourself, and now hoping you can get it over so it's the "cool" term to use. ;)Once is a novelty. Twice is a coincidence. Three instances make a trend. Draculas aside, medusa may be the better reference here, since it shows up in similar contexts to cerberus. That is to say, it's used as the creature name for the countless waves of video game monsters. Cerberuses are less common than medusas, but they still show up as normal enemies in (for example) Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. For the purposes of this particular discussion and how the work was represented in the debate, it actually does make it exponentially lesser, your opinion on the quality of the work notwithstanding. Citing "Harry Potter" as a reference to support your notion of the commonality of using the name Cerberus to refe...
  • 10:55 PM - dave2008 quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Epic Monsters: Cerberus (5E)
    It actually breathes petrification gas. Its power is a weird variation of its namesake mythological creature. And this has bothered me for a long time as well. I'm curious to learn about the origin of this particular monster. I posted the origin with link in post #20
  • 10:52 PM - dave2008 quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Epic Monsters: Cerberus (5E)
    Fluffy is not referred to as "a cerberus" or "the cerberus". He is referred to very specifically as a "three-headed dog." The name "Cerberus" is not used in either the book or the movie. That is what I thought, but @Saelorn seems to disagree with you. Now I have to go and try to find the book.
  • 09:20 PM - Saelorn quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Epic Monsters: Cerberus (5E)
    You're certainly free to refer to vampires as "draculas" if you wish, but it's not what the overwhelming majority of people who even know what a vampire and who Dracula is do.And I will continue to do so. Not that I have anywhere near the influence of Squirrel Girl, but I can continue to spread awareness where I can. In time, there will be fewer and fewer people who are unaware of the convention. You're referring to a piece of fan fiction: Just because a work is derivative, that doesn't make it any lesser. In this case, the quality of both writing and world-building out-strip the original author by light years.
  • 09:08 PM - Saelorn quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Epic Monsters: Cerberus (5E)
    Wait... what? You directly reference the named "medusa" at the end of this very paragraph! LOLI mean, there aren't any in popular culture. There isn't a show or comic or anything about someone who is a medusa. There aren't even any famous medusa side-characters, or love interests. It's just the original story, and then no-name monsters that show up in random encounters. You are quite literally the first person that I have ever heard refer to the category of vampires by the name of the arguably most famous one.Does nobody read comic books anymore? What is the world coming to? I'm not a big fan of attaching images in these forums, but here's part of a comic from like five years ago: 104943

Friday, 4th January, 2019

  • 08:31 PM - Henry quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Worlds of Design: “Old School” in RPGs and other Games – Part 1 Failure and Story
    They've at the very least dealt with player character permadeath, though, which should be condition them to at least expect that their characters _can_ die, if nothing else. :) Considering that (in Crit Role, at least) in their first campaign, EVERY single character who died (from a current player) was resurrected, I'd say the big death in their second campaign was the first time they've ever dealt with that for real, and I was glad to see it - it was a good 'teachable moment' about the game play, I believe. Other streams I've listened to (Glass Cannon, for example) have had multiple character deaths, and they did a pretty good job of making an important story consideration out of it.

Friday, 21st December, 2018

  • 05:22 PM - technoir quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Savant: Basic Class Information
    Props on the name of the class. I've been designing a couple of Intelligence based classes for my campaigns, and the best names I was able to come up with were Tactician (so-so) for the martial class and Expert (just sounds like a boast) or Surgeon (too narrow) for the healing/support class. I might have to "borrow" Savant from you because it has the perfect "sound" of a class name. Thanks. The subclasses purposes match the ones you described here. Great minds and all that.

Wednesday, 19th September, 2018

  • 04:26 PM - seebs quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    The challenge comes with a word such as "mahout" which really doesn't have much practical or even pop cultural use in most Western societies since "elephant rider" isn't really something that 99% of people will ever even need to think about. not with THAT attitude we told the kid about Hannibal crossing the Alps with elephants (not the recent TV character, the historical general), and a day or two later, someone said "and knowing is half the battle!" and he said "the other half is getting the elephants across the mountain". i'm so proud of him.

Tuesday, 18th September, 2018


Monday, 17th September, 2018

  • 10:24 PM - Doctor Futurity quoted Nathaniel Lee in post New D&D Monsters and More in Guildmasters’ Guide to Ravnica
    I'm ambivalent one way or another about Eberron as a setting -- I didn't play 3/3.5/4E and the idea of the world, at least at a high level, isn't that interesting to me for the most part -- but I do agree that if they're going to introduce a whole new campaign setting they shouldn't half-ass it as a DM's Guild only release. I personally would have preferred an update of Mystara or Krynn... or even a re-introduction of Spelljammer or Planescape. Eberron is an odd one, and I wasn't in to it for the most part even while playing 3/3.5/4, but the setting itself really grew on me when I finally checked it out. My main problem these days is that I really need and want modern updates of these settings; they all look so simple/juvenile to me now (I have faulty rose colored glasses when it comes to nostalgia for some reason). I used to love Mystara for the Gazetteers, for example, but the incongruent and highly inorganic anachronistic nature of its hodepodge cultural designs are too much for me now;...

Wednesday, 5th September, 2018

  • 09:24 PM - Mike Myler quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    I'm curious how this will fly with a more general crowd. I remember watching an interview with one of the designers of Dungeons & Dragons (can't remember if it was Mearls or Crawford) who talked about the process of designing the cavalier from Unearthed Arcana all the way to what finally made it into Xanathar's. One thing they pointed out was that with a class like that where a "companion" played a big role in the identity of the class, the character themselves had to be able to stand alone as well, since it's almost a given that the character will end up in scenarios where they simply cannot have their companion by their side. Yup. That was part of the thinking behind d12 Hit Dice and extra bonuses with whips (and a few other things like gradual natural armor and a freak-out feature when their pet is slain). The Mahout (and imminent Spellshaper prestige class) are one of the reasons I wanted the editor gig with EN5ider--there's a huge base of people to test new concepts in a forum that just does...
  • 07:50 PM - Mike Myler quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    More specifically, how did players feel about the class in terms of balance? Have you gotten a lot of good playtests with it at the various tiers? What kind of approach or process do you use in playtesting the class? I'm actually quite interested in this process at the moment because I'm trying my hand at adapting the warden for 5E in my setting. With my first go, I tried to put together the entire class at once from 1-20, but that got unbalanced (I could see myself without even playtesting it) really quick so I've taken a slightly different approach by just focusing on getting 1-4 to a place I feel comfortable with and then playtesting just that tier before moving on to the next one. I've told Erik to get in here (we co-wrote this largely because he had access to a great gaming club to use for playtesting purposes) and he should be swinging through. My playtests were low tier (1-4) to make sure the basic concept was accessible and fun (because the actual mahout themselves doesn't really ge...

Sunday, 2nd September, 2018

  • 12:20 PM - DEFCON 1 quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    The challenge comes with a word such as "mahout" which really doesn't have much practical or even pop cultural use in most Western societies since "elephant rider" isn't really something that 99% of people will ever even need to think about.Same could be said of the paladin. Other than a tv show and D&D, who ever used the word? And if marout became genericized through D&D, I imagine it'd become a trainer and rider of animals, not just elephants. Just like our ideas of the 'ninja' have turned into this pop cultural identity which has little to do with how they were historically. In any event it's probably not going to catch on regardless (since WotC itself would have to start using it to gain traction)... but you can chalk me up as someone who prefers single word identifiers to compound words as well. So I'm always happy to toss out beastmasters and swordmages whenever possible. :)

Saturday, 1st September, 2018

  • 10:18 PM - Zardnaar quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    Five bucks says you'd be in the extreme minority. It's a word that 99% of the population will never hear or need to use. That circuses are all but history now makes it that much harder. ;) I'll keep my $5. I picked up the word year ago either in the 1E DMG or reading about Alexander the Great reaching India. I read a lot of military/classical history though.

Thursday, 30th August, 2018

  • 05:15 PM - Hurin88 quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    I agree with your sentiment and was just giving you some grief. :) Even said as much a few posts back. ;) Right, sorry; I didn't catch that. But yes, I think we agree here.
  • 04:27 AM - Hurin88 quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    A bit of irony there in that most of the official class names are not at all generic but rather very specific to settings based on medieval Europe? ;) Fighter, Monk, Thief, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, and Wizard sound pretty generic to me. In any case, my point was that the primary purpose of the name is to give an general indication of what the class is like in a word or two. Pretty much any English speaker is going to be able to infer from the name 'Fighter' what the Fighter class does, and indeed from the name Beastmaster what a Beastmaster does. By contrast, most English speakers will not be able to infer anything about what a 'Mahout' does from the name. It is just my 2 cents of course, but I think the name of the class should be able to convey a general sense of what the class is about, without the necessity of a lengthy explanation. 'Mahout? What's that?' 'It's a Beastmaster.' 'Then why not just name it that?'

Wednesday, 29th August, 2018

  • 07:35 PM - Mike Myler quoted Nathaniel Lee in post The Mahout: Basic Class Information
    Fair point! :) Heck, "Beastmaster" is a lot more awe-inspiring a name than "Wrangler." ;) "Whisperer"? It has the advantage of sounding kinda cool and mysterious... but I feel a lot of players would be disappointed with the reality of the abilities versus what the mind could imagine the abilities would be with such a name. :p I imagine the order of events goes something like: - "Mahout? That's an interesting word. I wonder what that means." - "An Indian elephant rider?!" - "Oh, cool: Beast Master!" ;) Name circling took a while and for most of the design phase it was "monster trainer" which, thank heavens, has been left in the dust. :p

Friday, 29th June, 2018

  • 03:43 PM - Osgood quoted Nathaniel Lee in post Beadle & Grimm's Waterdeep: Dragon Heist - Platinum Edition
    If I'm going to spend $500 on tabletop role-playing game supplies for a more immersive gaming experience, I'll buy a bunch of Dwarven Forge sets. I'd say $500 will get you a few Dwarven Forge sets... if you want a bunch, add a zero to that number (spoken as someone who has a bunch of sets!).

Nathaniel Lee's Downloads

  Filename Total Downloads Rating Files Uploaded Last Updated

Most Recent Favorite Generators/Tables

View All Favorites