View Profile: Bedrockgames - D&D, Pathfinder, and RPGs at Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 10:20 PM
    I never suggested it was the only way.
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 08:07 PM
    You can spin any playstyle negatively if you want. And every play style has an extreme mode that isn't fun under the wrong GM. But there is nothing wrong with having death on the table, even allowing it to come in suddenly without warning. Doesn't mean it is omnipresent. It means it is a possibility in the game. If you don't like it, don't play that way. I am talking about what I enjoy. ...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 07:23 PM
    We are kind of going in circles here. I am not knocking 5E, nor am I knocking newer games that give different experiences. And I am glad they incorporated a lot of these classic ideas into the new edition. But I think people are much better off judging for themselves where older editions stand in all this and whether or not 5E offers the same epiphanies. My advice is anyone reading is to read the...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 07:06 PM
    I would say let people find out for themselves. I don't think my experience was related to 'going back'. It was because there was a specific feel of play that I wanted and couldn't get in my 3E and 4E sessions. That feel was quite clear when I used 2E. I've tried very hard to replicate that feel when I run my own games. Much of it has to do with how I approach skills. And I've seen new players...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 06:57 PM
    The present form of D&D is essentially pathfinder and 5E. AD&D is played in the OSR but the OSR isn’t dominating the market. For me it isn’t about underdogs or any of that. My feeling is what matters is people finding games that resonate with them and work for them in practice. I wouldn’t say for me it is about going backwards. I think innovation is great. It is about realizing sometimes we throw...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 06:20 PM
    I realize this. I started playing in the 80s, so I've seen things develop over time. But even I forgot how NWPs felt in practice. When I went back to them, I was half doing so intending to do it as a laugh. But more importantly, a lot of people didn't start playing until recently (1995 was over 20 years ago). And plenty of people haven't tried 1E, let alone 2E. By the way, I play lots of...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 02:28 PM
    based on your posts, I would definitely say posters who share your preferences probably won't find much value in NWPs. On the other hand, if you found skills in 3E a bit frustrating, if skill challenges are not your thing, NWPs and Secondary Skills, might be worth checking out. What you regard as weak descriptors, I regard as non-intrusive. They are more flavoring than build. And they don't feel...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 01:17 PM
    I think if you are in a campaign where death traps are known to exist, it can be incredibly suspenseful going into virtually any corridor. If you know for sure this place has traps, it is also going to be a suspenseful time getting through that gauntlet. Obviously if you don't like characters dying without forewarning, this approach isn't for you. As both a player and GM, I enjoy this sort of...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 04:27 AM
    It is an entirely subjective thing, and frankly I am not 100% sure why I preferred NWPs (I am just trying to offer the best explanation I can think of). But I know they worked better for the game I wanted to run. I found this to be the case with a lot of 2E, and I think much of it had to do with the approach to play and the assumptions behind many fo the rules. You frame that somewhat negatively...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 04:16 AM
    The reason I like that 2E NWPS don't scale up like 3E skills is that chances roughly stay consistent. In 3E you end up with tasks that are impossible unless you have an enormous bonus. That scale can really make things thorny in my view. Whereas with NWPs, the chance doesn't have this wide range of probability. I don't think most of them break down to 50/50. I haven't crunched the numbers...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 01:39 AM
    Again, I am not too worried about every beat being from a story here. You might have anti-climax, dead heroes and the like, but you'll also generate suspense that is meaningful. If I know my character can really die, or easily die, the suspense of that die roll when I trigger a blade trap is palpable. I also find this a much more exciting mode of play. Obviously I don't want my character to die,...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 01:16 AM
    The suspension is resolved by the die roll, and much of the suspense is set by the stakes involved. But you are going to have things leading up to it naturally in play. It isn't like you are just rolling a series of dice and saying what happened. People are explaining what they want to do, asking what they see, NPCs are responding. There is a lot that will be going on prompting the die roll in...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Friday, 22nd June, 2018, 12:10 AM
    All suspense eventually gets closure. If the players are at a casino, you'll have building suspense as they win, until they place that final bet. If it is a single hand or something, well, sure, but the suspense also ends in a James Bond movie when the cards are laid on the table. There is plenty of room in an RPG for the suspense to build prior to that (particularly if players and/or NPCs are...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 11:43 PM
    True. But in all these cases I think stakes and not knowing the outcomes matters a great deal. A roll of dice at a gambling table or card game, are suspenseful if the players stand to lose a lot. But that suspense hinges on them actually being able to lose whatever is at stake. Again, this is where the 'game' side of RPGs, and the inherent lack of predictability in RPGs can be a strength.
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 10:27 PM
    That is a very good example too because (spoilers) arguably the main character of the series leaves by the second season. I was told he also built in escape hatches for each of the characters in case the characters left (giving them alternate plotlines if they had to go).
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 10:25 PM
    I probably have a slightly different take on what story means in a game than some folks. I tend not to worry about it lining up with a platonic ideal of 'story' and just tend to view it as what we talk about in hindsight. If Tamlin dies by getting crushed by a rock that is where his story ends. On the other hand, I think of stories in games as individual threads for each character, and those can...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 07:37 PM
    My view is it is better to lean into the random nature of RPGs than fight it. I also think the surprise that creates, both for the GM and the players, is one of the most entertaining aspects of gaming. So I am all for allowing death to come with a die roll.
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 07:05 PM
    I think this is less true than it used to be (in part because some of the suspense got lost as people became more familiar with these patterns). Even if the character is narrating, it doesn't mean he survives now. Just look at a film like Casino. Clearly not a war movie, but still one where that narrator survives lulls you into a false sense of security. I find when I watch movies these days, I...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 03:06 PM
    I don't know what you want me to say Pemerton. I didn't realize he was talking about NWPs that function differently. And I don't see why they would be relevant to the point I was making. That was a response to me saying 2E NWPs worked well in my campaign. When I responded to his quote, I assumed he brought up OA NWPs because they functioned the same (it has been ages since I've even read the OA...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 02:37 PM
    Well, I wasn’t talking about OA NWPs. I was talking about the ones from the first 2E players handbook. The OA NWPs are a whole other conversation.
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 01:57 PM
    I use it all the time. I think it can be a great deal of fun.
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 01:56 PM
    For me, the real threat of character death is a source of suspense or trepidation. There are other places for suspense in the game as well (it can occur around drama or just not knowing what is unfolding). But I quite like the classic experience of walking down hall, hoping a blade trap doesn't cut me in half or something.
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 01:45 PM
    I tended to use them as last resort measures. Here is what I noticed when I shifted back to 2E, instantly. I should say, I had also recently re-read the 1E DMG, so that might have been an influence. I was asking for rolls that much as players interacted with the world. Because there wasn't a big list of buttons on the character sheet, they just said what they wanted to do, and I usually allowed...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 01:34 PM
    Honestly, this is part of the appeal I think. They are not central to the game. This is why I keep describing the 3E skills as intrusive. Things like NWPs only bothered us as much as we allowed them to. It was a lot harder not to be bothered by Skills in 3E you didn't like. I think we just have a fundamental disagreement on what RPGs are about and for. I am not particularly interested in an RPG...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Thursday, 21st June, 2018, 01:30 PM
    This is so dependent on which NWPs you choose to take though. Obviously if your taking a NWP tied to an ability score of 9 or something, your chances will be poor. In my experience, players tended to take NWPs that connected well with their abilities. And you can still increase your ranks in them. If you have a NWP for a skill that is 13 or higher for example, your chances are not that bad. Also,...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Wednesday, 20th June, 2018, 07:38 PM
    I haven't played it, but will make a point of checking it out.
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Wednesday, 20th June, 2018, 07:34 PM
    I still use a full list of skills, but it is more in how I approach them, than in the skills themselves. The most recent version of my game is Wandering Heroes of Ogre Gate. Most of what I talk about is in the advice on using skills section. For me the key is not having skills feel like buttons in play. But the game is skill-based, so there are skills in it. I've also been experimenting with...
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Wednesday, 20th June, 2018, 04:09 PM
    Mostly I play my own system now (and it does have skills, though I use them somewhat different than most people). I think I just like lighter skill systems and I find I prefer skill systems that interfere the least with RP or environmental interaction. That said, skills are popular with most players I game with, and I've learned to adapt how I use them to get the best result for my campaigns....
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  • Bedrockgames's Avatar
    Wednesday, 20th June, 2018, 02:16 PM
    I think if you feel this way, you should at least give NWPs a try again and see how they play. Folks should draw their own conclusions as well, rather than take anyone's word for it. I went back to 2E around 2007-2008 for a while and in all honesty, expected to laugh at many of the mechanics in action. To my surprise things like NWPs worked a heck of a lot better for my style of play, than the...
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About Bedrockgames

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Thursday, 21st June, 2018

  • 08:20 PM - Skyscraper mentioned Bedrockgames in post Death and Storytelling
    Bedrockgames so I understand that you like to have death be a real threat and let the dice decide when it happens (so do I); but this apart, how do you reconcile death with the story that the now-dead PC was linked to, when it happens? Do you simply let the storyline that was linked to that PC exclusively, die with him or her? Tony Vargas you appear to suggest that death is frequent, but so is resurrection, so it's no big deal because PCs are brought back easily; or in the alternative, you use back up PC's. In the case of back-up PC's, how do you reconcile the story that the PC was linked to, with his disappearance from the game? Re: the ease to access of raise dead in D&D: I've done away with that spell, personally; but for the purposes of this discussion, let's disregard the situation where the PC dies but is brought back which is, in essence, equivalent to healing the PC.

Friday, 11th May, 2018

  • 10:42 PM - Hussar mentioned Bedrockgames in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    I don't think so. A good analogy for this would be if Hussar said, "I don't like vehicles, because they're too big. Cars, trucks, semis, and airplanes are just too much. That's why I ride a motorcycle. That's not a vehicle." Pointing out that a motorcycle IS a vehicle, just a smaller one that he does like is not splitting hairs. It's similarly not splitting hairs to point out the fact that he does worldbuild, even if on a smaller scale. Funny how all your definition jokes keep requiring the change of definitions of known words. I've posted the definition of world building, a few times now, and you've still insisted on the notion that your definition is the only possible one. Does make winning a discussion easier when you think that you can control what words mean. ------- Bedrockgames - what I would like to see is a heck of a lot less world building, both at the table and in publication. Instead of Dragon+ having 3/4 of its material (and Dragon before it wasn't much different) revolve around world building, focus more on practical stuff - things that can actually, directly be used at the table. Give me setting material in a form I can directly use - adventures are great. Setting guides that spend page after page after page detailing Elven Tea Ceremonies, not so much. Given that there are about 20000 pages of setting material for Forgotten Realms, do we actually need any more? Don't give me the history of that town, give me a town with 6 interesting locations fully statted up, with maps, that I can plug and play. Don't give me a Mordenkainens Monster book, full of setting crap that I will never use. Give me less monsters, but, in a form that I can just drop into my game with little or no work. As a DM, my advice is GET TO THE POINT. Quit faffing ab...
  • 05:59 PM - Aldarc mentioned Bedrockgames in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    But I was asking about that specific passage... Him having done both in the thread means he has made general statements about worldbuilding while you claimed he was only stating preference.Let's retrace our steps a bit for contextualization because this entire line of thinking is becoming absurd, and I have little desire to perpetuate that absurdity. I disagreed with Bedrockgames's assertion and kinda spiteful characterization that Hussar was expressing his opinion "as an absolute" and that "Hussar has the answer for everyone." This runs counter, IME, to how I see Hussar expressing his viewpoints in the context of the wider conversation. You asked what then we were discussing. And in the context of this entire conversation, one portion of that is Hussar's preferences rooted in and based on his general observations about worldbuilding as an enterprise of RPGs. I am talking about the wider context of his conversation in this thread. You then asked for my reading on a specific passage. My reading of this passage is again tied to my understanding of Hussar's argument in this entire thread, and I do think that his post in question that you quoted is led by those preferences. Aldarc, I share a lot of Imaro's sentiments here. I think you and Hussar are trying to have it both ways, on the one hand saying "this is just my opinion and if you object you are reacting ...
  • 03:24 PM - Aldarc mentioned Bedrockgames in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    ... Hussar clearly knows what is better for his specific game (something that hasn't really been addressed or acknowledged from those against worldbuilding) so that begs the question... what is the conversation supposed to be around if he's asserting this only for himself and his particular game?One would certainly hope that you would know that before you chose to wade into it. There are multiple divergent conversations at play here though. On this point, however, I think that Hussar is clearly discussing his own preferences that he would like expressed in published materials. As to the rest of the conversations? That might be a bit much to summarize. That's interesting but do you have anything to back this disagreement up with, because so far I've seen one style that eschews pre-authored content that has validity around worldbuilding being "bad" for it. And even with that one I would say worldbuilding isn't relevant for it vs. actually being bad.I would say that the argument that Bedrockgames presented was insufficient for explaining the reactions, and I provided another explanation that I believe describes it or that would supplement Bedrock's. Lol... what a way to dismiss the other side of a conversation... Don't address their responses and counterpoints, just declare their perspective as emotionally driven and use a bad analogy (oh the irony) to characterize their responses as both illogical and ill-infomed. See it's this type of declaration that gets conversations emotionally driven.But the bold is where you are wrong, Imaro. Their responses and counterpoints have been addressed repeatedly by me and others, but addressing those points was not my intent here, Imaro, as the goal was explaining the source of the emotional backlash. You were talking about the emotional content of the word "bad" that you felt was laden in the title "Why Worldbuilding is Bad" and Bedrockgames why people were reacting so strongly to the central premise. And given how there is a lot of m...

Thursday, 10th May, 2018

  • 04:52 AM - Hussar mentioned Bedrockgames in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    But, then Bedrockgames, why not actually make that clear? Something like, "If you run open ended, sandbox style campaigns, then world building becomes more necessary"? Instead of, "Well, world building is good" which is what I generally get replied to me over and over again. And, as far as the generally agreed upon definition goes, I suggest Wikipedia, or TV Tropes. Both have excellent definitions that I've been following all the way along. "All setting is world building" is a definition of world building that is largely distinct to the folks in this thread. No one else uses that definition. Which is why we talk about world building in something like Lord of the Rings or SoFA but not works like Phantom of the Opera. Take Star Wars. If you only watched Ep's IV through VI, there's extremely little world building going on there. Take Chewbacca. All you would know about Chewie is that he is a Wookie. That's about it. You wouldn't know the name of his planet, how old he is, or anything else. ...

Tuesday, 8th May, 2018

  • 06:34 PM - Aldarc mentioned Bedrockgames in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    This is a bad argument. Do you seriously need him to support the assertion that broad does not equate to meaningless?. Because by any rational definition of those words, they have distinct meanings. I think the onus is on you to prove his definition is meaningless. You didn't. You simply asserted it. Either way, this isn't a logic class. We're speaking in plain language and expressing opinions here. We don't need to construct syllogisms for teacher.His statement "broad does not mean meaningless" is a bad argument when that is not what I said, but I'm so glad that you failed to pick up on that, Bedrockgames. I think the onus is on you to actually read.

Sunday, 29th April, 2018

  • 11:08 PM - Hussar mentioned Bedrockgames in post Why Worldbuilding is Bad
    But, again, how much do you actually need? There's thirty years of Dragon magazine out there. Just the print stuff, not the 4e version. At about 100 pages per magazine, that's somewhere in the neighborhood of 30000 pages of material. Never minding anything else. There's religions with less page count. :D Bedrockgames - you usually start with a monster. Fair enough. Does that mean you start with the given world building text - start with the Monster Manual, go back through Dragon to look at the Ecology of article, delve into Forgotten Realms or Greyhawk to reference how that creature was used there, then dig into D&D branded novels to give it that final touch? Or does it mean that you might use a line or two from the Monster Manual, and then 99% of the material is your own?
  • 06:07 AM - Maxperson mentioned Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    I'd VERY strongly advice, if you were to take an interest in that particular dialog, to go back and read the parts of the thread Max contributed. I think you'll VERY QUICKLY find that pemerton is fully justified in his approach. I mean, honestly, don't bother, you can take it from me. It would be pretty tedious to do (though sometimes kinda amusing in a certain way). Bedrockgames. Should you go back and look, you will see me posting in good faith in the beginning, arguing against the bad faith misrepresentations of pemerton. AbdulAlhazred saw that as well. After a long while, though, I got sick of all the misrepresentations(as it became apparent that he was just deliberately misportraying things) and started tossing them right back at pemerton. AbdulAlhazred saw that as well. Then later on I explained what I was doing to AbdulAlhazred. Even after all of that, he chooses willful ignorance over truth and is portraying me the way he is posting here. Truthfully there are times when Max also says things that are illuminating, but I half think its by accident, I just don't know. Mostly I take him to be a hard case example of a contrarian, he's just GOT to 'win' any exchange of words. No, nothing I've done here is by accident.
  • 04:53 AM - Ovinomancer mentioned Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...nd read the parts of the thread Max contributed. I think you'll VERY QUICKLY find that pemerton is fully justified in his approach. I mean, honestly, don't bother, you can take it from me. It would be pretty tedious to do (though sometimes kinda amusing in a certain way). Truthfully there are times when Max also says things that are illuminating, but I half think its by accident, I just don't know. Mostly I take him to be a hard case example of a contrarian, he's just GOT to 'win' any exchange of words. I'm pretty sure there's a contingent that thinks the same of pemerton. Attacking Max because another poster calls out pemerton in his response to Max doesn't address the issues called out, you know? You just look like a jerk for throwing Max under the bus to divert from the criticism of pemerton's post. Having been deeply misrepresented by pemerton and then told by pemerton that he can't be bothered to go back and see what I said to begin with, I'm somewhat sympathetic to Bedrockgames' points, here. Sure, Max doesn't behave well sometimes, and I don't agree with him quite often, but that's got nothing to do with what Bedrockgames said about pemerton's post above.

Tuesday, 19th April, 2016

  • 09:01 PM - Quickleaf mentioned Bedrockgames in post Adventure Design
    ...g pulled into the material a bit in advance. So I'll happily buy something that has that sort of thing. Ultimately what does need attention regardless of approach to me, is what the players see, feel and interact with. For example, what an NPCs name, profession and background is might be less Important than how they smell, act, behave and are doing. So often, situations are static when they are hardly ever that way. Good topic. Can you elaborate on what you consider to be a "wall of text" and what alternatives there are to explaining the author's vision of the adventure to the reader? If, for example, every sentence is useful, does that mean it's a "wall of text," or does it require a certain amount of less useful "fluff" in there? I'm trying to get a feel for when something crosses over into the wall of text category. There's sort of two extremes when it comes to how an adventure communicates the author's vision to the reader (GM). Show or Tell. "Show" is more like what Bedrockgames is getting at, where the adventure writer tries to bring the reader/GM's mind into the adventure's themes and motifs, so that once the GM gets it, he or she describes scenes and NPCs from that framework. For example, a Ravenloft adventure would draw the reader's mind into the Gothic Horror point of view, trusting their words to evoke something in the GM, and then trusting the GM to convey that as he or she sees fit to the players. Personally, I like that approach because it emphasizes the strength of the tabletop RPG: interaction between the gamers. My group will experience the adventure a little differently (or perhaps a lot differently!) from your group and that's OK, in fact it's to be desired because it shows we're tailoring the experience to our groups. "Tell" is more like what Waylander the Slayer is getting at, where the adventure precisely describes what the PCs sense. Traditionally this was handled with boxed text. In many ways this is the opposite of "show" because it d...

Tuesday, 22nd December, 2015

  • 12:10 AM - Manbearcat mentioned Bedrockgames in post Failing Forward
    Just a quick post. Bedrockgames, there is a place for falls, death, and loss in games that feature/systematize Fail Forward is a/the primary technique for play propulsion. Just upthread I sblocked the majority portion of a conflict (you can reference it for context if you need/care to). Here is the (not sblocked) end of that conflict: GM (Me): The load off the goblin brother immediately invigorates him as his other hand firmly grasps the sled. Your heroic efforts and seeing his brother have to firm hand-holds on the sled instills further strength in him to survive. The sled very, very slowly rises as the weight is still immense. Your fingers are growing so very weary. There is little chance that you can just hold on like this for the time it will take for the sled to rise to the top. Otthor's player: With my extra weight off the sled, I know it will rise more quickly. If I fall, so be it. Defy Danger (Str) 1, 1 - 1 = 1 Mark 1 xp My strength is gone. Before my hands let go of their own volitio...

Monday, 21st December, 2015

  • 08:06 PM - pemerton mentioned Bedrockgames in post Failing Forward
    Bedrockgames - apropos of the role of NPCs in "fail forward" play, have a look at my post just above this one. The NPC's anger at the mage for bringing orcs into the desert was a motivation made up by me on the spot, in order to explain why the tribesmen would be hostile to the PC. I also built in some other backstory too - the PC mage had been looking for an old contact "The Desert Fox", and it turned out - as Wassal the hostile tribesman explained (and as I, the GM, decided on the spot) - that the Desert Fox was actually Jabal the Red, now a leading figure in the sorcerous cabal to which the PC mage belongs. And Wassal had been bonded to the Desert Fox for many years before achieving his freedom and coming to lead his own band of warriors. That's the sort of way in which "fail forward" leads to the creation of backstory, but as much, or even more, as part of the output of action resolution rather than as an input to action resolution.
  • 07:58 PM - pemerton mentioned Bedrockgames in post Failing Forward
    But the character still achieved the goal - which is by definition a success, not a failure.Have a look at the last page of posts between me, Bedrockgames and Umbran. I think you are conflating means and ends here, whereas - in play which makes extensive use of "fail forward" - the difference between means and ends (or what BW calls task and intent) is pretty crucial. Returning again to Manbearcat's Mt Pudding example: the goal is to get to the top of Mt Pudding and find the pudding. Without the divining rod, that goal is no longer automatically achieved simply by getting to the top of the mountain. So when the failed climbing check is adjudicated as "You lose your diving rod down the crevasse as you narrowly avoid going into it yourself," the character has not achieved his/her goal, and in fact has become less likely to achieve it. To give another example from my BW game: The PCs were in the Bright Desert, south of the Abor-Alz. The party had become separated: the elven princess had been captured by orcs, the sorcerer assassin had run away from the same orcs, and the princess's retainer and the mage were still at camp waitin...

Friday, 30th October, 2015

  • 09:13 PM - El Mahdi mentioned Bedrockgames in post Warlord Name Poll
    ...ominantly craft skill level, craft guild rank, or academic/musical) Headman/Hauptman (root of Captain and too authoritative) Proconsul (the Pro- makes it too authoritative) Shepherd (too religious, too bucolic, too Firefly) Synergist (too boring, and sounds like some kind of psychic) Armiger (exclusively military and noble) Sherriff (too noble, too law enforcement) Impetro/Impetrus (too authoritative – Imperial) Adjunct (too subordinate, too Star Trek Borg - Seven of Nine, Tertiary Adjunct of Unimatrix Zero-One) Prolucutor (the Pro- makes it too authoritative, sounds like the person is a professional talker, and is just too hard to say) Warden (too Ranger) Leader(zzzzzzzzzz…) @3e4ever ; @77IM @Aaron Of Barbaria; @AbdulAlhazred ; @admcewen ; @Aenghus ; @Ahrimon ; @Ainulindalion ; @airwalkrr; @Aldarc ; @akr71 ; @AmerginLiath ; @Andor ; @AntiStateQuixote ; @aramis erak; @Aribar ; @Arnwolf ; @Ashkelon ; @Ashrym ; @Athinar ; @AtomicPope ; @Azurewraith; @Azzy ; @Bawylie ; @bedir than ; @Bedrockgames ; @bert1000 ; @billd91 ; @Blackbrrd; @Blackwarder ; @Blue ; @Bluenose ; @brehobit ; @BryonD ; @Bupp ; @Campbell ; @CapnZapp; @CaptainConundrum ; @CaptainGemini ; @Carlsen Chris ; @casterblaster ; @CasvalRemDeikun; @cbwjm ; @ccooke ; @Celebrim ; @Celondon @ChameleonX ; @Charles Wright ; ChrisCarlson; @CM ; @cmad1977 ; @costermonger ; @Creamsteak ; @Crothian ; @Cybit ; @Dausuul; @Dayte ; @dd.stevenson ; @DEFCON 1 ; @Delazar ; @DersitePhantom ; @Diffan ; @discosoc; @D'karr ; @Doc Klueless ; @doctorbadwolf ; @DonAdam ; @Dragoslav ; @Duganson; @EdL ; @EditorBFG ; @Edwin Suijkerbuijk ; @Eejit ; @ehren37 ; @Elfcrusher ; @El Mahdi ; @epithet; @erf_beto ; @Eric V ; @eryndel ; @Evenglare ; @ExploderWizard ; @EzekielRaiden; @Fedge123 ; @fendak ; @FireLance ; @Fishing_Minigame ; @Flamestrike ; @FLexor the Mighty! ; @Forged Fury ; @Fragsie ; @Fralex ; @FreeTheSlaves ; @froth ; @Gadget; @Galendril ; @GameOgre ; @Garthanos ; @Ghost Matter ; @Giltonio_Santos ; @Gimul; @GMforPowergamers ; @Gnashtooth ...

Thursday, 23rd April, 2015

  • 07:01 AM - pemerton mentioned Bedrockgames in post Confirm or Deny: D&D4e would be going strong had it not been titled D&D
    That's because it speaks to us and coins a label to common dislikes of 4e.I take it, then, that you don't think it's unreasonable to refer to Ron Edwards' analysis just because Bedrockgames doesn't like it? I don't consider it a pejorative. I consider it a useful concept.And obviously I consider Ron Edwards a much deeper thinker about RPG design than Justin Alexander. I don't know, ask your friend who has been invoking the name of the guy who called everyone brain damaged for liking white wolf or for using a theory that essentially dismissed immersion and simulation as viable things in RPGs.Next time feel free to mention me - though I'm not sure that I'm Hussar's friend; I've never interacted with him except on these forums. Also, Edwards didn't say that people were brain damaged for liking WW. He said they were brain damaged by playing WW - and after he then apologised for having done so. As for whether he dismissed simulation as a viable thing in RPGs, I guess this is what you think is a dismissal: Simulationist play looks awfully strange to those who enjoy lots of metagame and overt social context during play. "You do it just to do it? What the hell i...

Wednesday, 18th June, 2014

  • 05:33 PM - gamerprinter mentioned Bedrockgames in post RPG Patents?
    That does not agree with what google says about the patent: http://www.google.com/patents/us20140038722 The application was made on August 6, 2012. The application was private to the patent office, as usual, for 18 months. The application was then published in February, 2014. But that doesn't mean it was granted - it simply establishes precedent. It is currently listed with a publication type "Application". If the patent had been granted, it would be listed with type, "Grant" (see here for an example of one that has been granted: http://www.google.com/patents/US5370566) So, you may have been misinformed. Yeah, sorry for the misunderstanding, my patent discussion has nothing to do with the RPG patent issue of the OP. I was simply pointing out an instance where a patent was granted for a practice that had been in use by other companies for 15+ years, yet still got approved. I was not referring to the Universal Horizon RPG - which aside from this thread, I know nothing about. @Bedrockgames - it wasn't for a game, rather it was for an internet search tool function commonly used by many websites.

Monday, 31st March, 2014

  • 12:19 PM - pemerton mentioned Bedrockgames in post Do alignments improve the gaming experience?
    ...ht find themselves in reasonable disagreement with their patron deities. For me, this is the model of paladin-as-warlock: it suggests to me that the paladin has made a pact, and does not really fit with my conception of what faith, as a value and a commitment, requires. (The only poster I can recall who has embraced the idea that the player really is expected to subordinate the judgement of rightness to the dictates of the gods - which by my lights does make sense of faith in the game, but does not satisfy my particular priorities for affirming expressive/evaluative responses by players - is Mishihari Lord. To be honest I've been surprised that this is not a more widespread approach - to me it seems to be one pretty plausible interpretation of what 2nd ed AD&D alignment aims at, and also 3E alignment.) Other posters in this thread seem to me to have other priorities in relation to some of these aspects of play. For instance, most of those other players, as best I can tell (eg Bedrockgames, N'raac, probably others too), seem to prioritise consistency of the gods as NPCs adjudicated by the GM over affirming the expressive/evaluative responses of the players; and to draw (some version of) the distinction you also have drawn between "goodness" and "rightness". The upshot of this, such that when it comes to paladinhood and clerichood it is the judgement of the GM that has priority over the players' judgements, seems to be something they are happy to embrace. That is all fine, of course: others can play as they wish. But it is not an argument that alignment is not an impediment to my gaming experience, because it gives me no reason to embrace those consequences of using mechanical alignment. An additional aspect of the discussion that comes through mostly in N'raac's posts, and that reminds me of some aspects of the long Fighters vs Spellcasters thread, is what seems to be an ongoing attempt to show that Hussar and I are really doing the very thing that we say ...

Sunday, 16th March, 2014

  • 11:12 AM - Hussar mentioned Bedrockgames in post Do alignments improve the gaming experience?
    ...e was that I track virtually nothing in the game and he responded by throwing up his hands and declaring that I wasn't even playing a game anymore. And, from his perspective, he has a very good point. The goal of gamist play is to challenge yourself against the scenarios provided by the DM. You play from the perspective that everything is a puzzle or challenge. Alignment is useful in that it defines some of the difficulty levels of the game. Without mechanical alignment, you are free to choose the solution which is the most expedient. But, that's ultimately unsatisfying. It's like playing a video game on easy mode. There's no challenge (or at least the challenge is significantly reduced). The same goes for the idea of the players choosing their own levels or being able to choose what monsters to face. That wouldn't work in a gamist game. It would be entirely boring. It's God Mode play. Very unsatisfying. 2. The Simulationists (with a heavy dose of immersionists) Bedrockgames talks about "exploring the DM's world". That's a pretty clear simulationist approach to the game. And, if alignment can mean multiple things, you can't really explore it. It's like trying to explore a quantum situation where something is and is not at the same time. It's not going to be satisfying, because you can't explore it. With N'raac, he's approaching things heavily from a world building point of view. If a player (and thus a character because for an immersionist, there should be little to no difference) can define morality, then there isn't any morality in the world. It's like the situation with the Glabrezu wish that got brought up earlier in the thread. For N'raac, you use the alignment mechanics to increase the difficulty to gain a free wish because if it was easy, everyone in the world who could, would do it. For me, the world can go hang. I'd allow the wishes to go through because it would make an interesting story. Which brings us to the third corner of the ...

Monday, 10th March, 2014

  • 07:21 AM - pemerton mentioned Bedrockgames in post Do alignments improve the gaming experience?
    Any act so evil as to cause, in and of itself, a change of alignment would need to be pretty heinous, which would seem to make its evil pretty obvious.And? You, Imaro and Bedrockgames are all saying that it makes sense, in such circumstances, for the character to assert that the "cosmological forces of good" have made an error. I don't see how that is coherent, given the premise that such a force exists, and that the character has been acted upon it (by losing paladinhood or changing alignment). Are you now saying that it doesn't make sense, at least in cases of heinousness (whatever exactly that means in this context), for the character to contest the judgement of the cosmological force in question? In that case you're agreeing with me, aren't you? Execution of a convicted criminal, where a society believes in capital punishment. It is not a Good act, yet it seems death to criminals is quite acceptable to LG Paladins. Do you realise that this is hugely contentious? Two of the most historically famous theorists of respect for life and the right to life - Locke and Kant - believe that capital punishment can be permitted and even mandatory. Kant, in particul...

Saturday, 8th March, 2014

  • 01:54 AM - pemerton mentioned Bedrockgames in post Do alignments improve the gaming experience?
    ...g certain actions and beings "evil", is clearly not using the word ironically (for instance, the remarks in the 3E PHB about why evil alignments are dangerous are clearly not intended ironically). However, you keep leaping to Good or Evil - what happened to the middle ground of "Neutral"? <snip> Where did that wide middle ground go? Perhaps that Paladin whose tenets are Justice, but who just can't get beyond his loyalty to a black sheep sibling, or an NG priest who just can't get over the slaughter of his village by Goblins when he was young?I'm not talking about the middle ground. Presumably we are all agreed that if mechanical alignment is being used then some behaviour is not neutral but evil. That's what I want to talk about. (Although presumably a paladin who does enough middle ground stuff rather than good stuff will change alignment from LG to something neutral, and hence lose his/her class.) My contention is this: in a game using mechanical alignment in the way Bedrockgames has described upthread, in which there are, therefore, objective cosmological forces of good and evil, a PC who does stuff that the force of good says is not good has no rational basis on which to disupte that judgement. The paladin who can't get beyond loyalty to his/her sibling, for instance, would have to recognise that in behaving that way s/he was falling short of his/her ideals. The priest who harbours vengeful hatred for goblins would have to recognise that that was a moral failing on his/her part. (This is hardly an unusual thing, either - most people recognise that they have emotions or inclinations that don't live up to their own ideals.) If, in the end/ that character was punished by the forces of cosmological good for those inclinations, the character could not rationally contest that punishment, as it is objectively correct and the character knows that to be so. Related to my contention is a question - echoing Hussar: what would count as an example of permissible GM en...


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Friday, 13th July, 2018

  • 05:08 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Flipping the Table: Did Removing Miniatures Save D&D?
    I think it would heavily derail the thread getting hung up on kits. It's OK, I was just bringing in a historical perspective. Kits were, by the standards of TSR era D&D, something of an innovation, but they were all over the map. Later build mechanics - backgrounds, themes, feats, archetypes, etc - often were a bit like Kits, because kits were so varied in what they tried to do. I can't remember off the top of my head on this one. But if you do go looking for the answer, one point of caution I would give is 2E wasn't always consistent so you might want to check a few different places to see if the answer is always the same. Yeah, I gave up on 2e about half way through the run, and don't have nearly all the books, so I wouldn't go digging around in it like I sometimes do 1e. ;) The inconsistency among the early Complete Books that I do have, though, was striking. Complete Fighter seemed kinda 'meh,' until Complete Theif came out and was just... IDK, 'why did you even bother?' While Compl...

Thursday, 12th July, 2018

  • 11:38 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Flipping the Table: Did Removing Miniatures Save D&D?
    I may have liked them due to their wide application and what you describe as a lack of focus. For me it was about the right level of customization for D&D. They also leaned more on flavor than crunch, which I liked. It was quite a range. There were Thief Kits that were a sentence or two and a minor bonus, Fighter kits that were a paragraph of flavor, and at least one Wizard kit (Mystic, IIRC, I played one for a minute or two) that was a page long and gave a couple of significant special abilities. Later kits in, like, the Complete Boook of Elves were notoriously broken, too. I can't recall: could you take more than one Kit, if you were cleric/wizard elf could you take an Elf Kit, Cleric Kit, & wizard Kit?
  • 10:47 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Flipping the Table: Did Removing Miniatures Save D&D?
    3E's strength is its customizability. Of characters, by the player, yes. While 5e's is the customizability of the campaign by the DM. Makes it dreadfully hard to say which is difinitively the better game. But I think on most days, that isn't what I was looking for in D&D. And I definitely wasn't looking for player customization to have such an impact on the setting itself (which it often would in my experience in 3E). Yeah, that definitely seems like an artifact not of customization, but of how it was delivered: in a 'list based' fashion, through an ever-growing selection of supplements & player-facing options, each very specific in fluff/flavor. If a player reeeeallly wanted a particulare function, effect, combo or whatever on the mechanics side, he might be 'forced' to bring in conflicting or campaign-inappropriate 'flavors'; if he wanted a particular flavor, he had to wait for it to get a mechanical reprentation and hope it meshed with the rest of the build, or create a build around ...
  • 07:00 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Flipping the Table: Did Removing Miniatures Save D&D?
    I was always quite torn over the whole build thing. ...I think there are two basic things I found different about it that changed things. The first is the books were much more written for the players rather than the GM and there was a baked in assumption that worked its way into the gaming culture over time, that if it was in the books, the players have access to it. The Cult of RAW, yeah. ;) That's not so much an artifact of build systems, in general, as the 3.x approach to it still being so very... well Core-D&D-experience-like, actually. In older versions of D&D, you had no real direct/voluntary control over how your character developed after choosign race/class, the DM might decide that the magic pool you drank from turned your skin purple, or you might get a magic item that made you superhumanly strong, or swapped your assigned sex. While, in 3e, you had a tremendous lattitude to customize your character with MCing and with make/buy items, you still had this dependence on the items and opt...

Wednesday, 11th July, 2018

  • 05:41 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Flipping the Table: Did Removing Miniatures Save D&D?
    From the GM and player side, I just strongly disliked the wishlist approach to play. I'd much rather be in a game where we trust the GM to surprise us with stuff. You totally know the style I'm talking about, above. When the game started becoming geared toward builds, it sucked a lot of fun from the game for me. OTOH, while I really appreciate the more DM-centric approach of 5e, I also quite enjoyed the 'geared towards builds' approach of 3.x ( as well as Hero, 4e, & many other non-D&D games out there). ;)

Monday, 25th June, 2018

  • 09:21 PM - kenmarable quoted Bedrockgames in post Everybody Cheats?
    Lol. I am not going to read every book that comes up in a thread like this. I am not terribly interested in reading the book to be honest. I am just saying the claim sounds a bit suspect. My question about his methods still stands though if someone has an answer. So... you think the claim and methods behind it are suspect but even after someone pointed you to the source, you're not interested and want someone else to figure it out for you? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ I guess that might have to stay one of life's mysteries for ya then! Sometimes if you want to know something, you have to do your own homework. ;)
  • 02:56 PM - Aldarc quoted Bedrockgames in post Everybody Cheats?
    Lol. I am not going to read every book that comes up in a thread like this. I am not terribly interested in reading the book to be honest. I am just saying the claim sounds a bit suspect. My question about his methods still stands though if someone has an answer.Okay. A big part of the initial claim in the article comes from this comment: The large majority of interviewees admitted to cheating, and in the games I played, I cheated as well.So now we need to know something about the methodology here. And so I did a search in the Google book document for "interview." I cannot see the full excerpt, but there is a small snippet that reads "In addition to participant observation, I conducted lengthy interviews (one to three hours) with two dozen gamers. Although the interview subjects are neither a random sampling nor systematic sampling of gamers..." and then it cuts off. So it's possible that the "large majority of interviewees" then reflects the "large majority" of the two dozen sampled. The whole ...
  • 01:07 PM - Morrus quoted Bedrockgames in post Everybody Cheats?
    Lol. I am not going to read every book that comes up in a thread like this. I am not terribly interested in reading the book to be honest. I am just saying the claim sounds a bit suspect. My question about his methods still stands though if someone has an answer. As I often say when somebody posits that their personal anecdote is more compelling than data, I can confirm from my experience of playing D&D for 30 years that no Americans play D&D.
  • 08:24 AM - Aldarc quoted Bedrockgames in post Everybody Cheats?
    How many people did this guy interview and survey? This claim seems pretty dubious to me based on experience.Read the book that's on Google Books to find out? Again, your experience may vary, in part, because this book was published in 1983.

Friday, 22nd June, 2018

  • 09:00 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Suspense in RPGs
    You can spin any playstyle negatively if you want. And every play style has an extreme mode that isn't fun under the wrong GM. But there is nothing wrong with having death on the table, even allowing it to come in suddenly without warning. There's nothing morally/ethically wrong with the style, no. But, it's not the only way to build suspense, and may well work against the experience of suspense if over-played. I think there are lots of potential loss conditions in RPGs. Not succeeding at the adventure is a potential loss condition. So is dying, or losing an arm. Having your family or close friends wiped out is a potential loss condition. Not winning an election can even be a loss condition. Losing a powerful magic artifact could be another. I don't think it is all about loss of control of the character.There's a lot of potenital victory/loss conditions for a character, in a scenario, certainly. They're internal to the larger context of the RPG, though. Your character can fail to find (or man...
  • 07:38 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    We are kind of going in circles here. I am not knocking 5E, nor am I knocking newer games that give different experiences. And I am glad they incorporated a lot of these classic ideas into the new edition. But I think people are much better off judging for themselves where older editions stand in all this and whether or not 5E offers the same epiphanies. I think you're advising people who have tried trendy kale and reached a conclusion about it to also try good old-fashioned collard greens, because they're totally different. ;P My contrary advice to those who have already tried D&D (in any form, but especially 5e), and are still willing to give the hobby a chance, to go to newer games (if they can even find them), rather than some other version of D&D, or some other revivified game from the 20th century. ...if you do want the historical perspective, you can get it from watching grognards like us argue on the internet. ;) (Edit: It occurs to me that no one who might concievably ...
  • 07:11 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    The present form of D&D is essentially pathfinder and 5E. AD&D is played in the OSR but the OSR isn’t dominating the market. 5e has thoroughly beaten PF from the moment it came back to the market. (Not that PF & OSR are inconsequencial, but 2nd is a long way behind 1st at this point. And they're both still D&D, OSR still embracing the DM-mediated improv we're talking about. PF, admittedly, is player-entitling and optimization prone, in contrast.) So, yeah, top dog. And, 5e evokes a lot of what you're talking about, from 1e with vague rules that don't neatly cover many situations, it just does so up-front, with the presentation of it's shading of the core d20 mechanic. It puts the DM determining ('narrating') succes or failure /before/ any dice rolls or skill selections. From 3.x/PF back to 1e might've been a bit of a revelation for someone who started with e'm (if you drew a DM good who could handle the challenge) or re-revelation for someone away from the classic game for a while. But, I...
  • 06:51 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Suspense in RPGs
    I think if you are in a campaign where death traps are known to exist, it can be incredibly suspenseful going into virtually any corridor. Suspense also wears off, if not eventually resolved or, if continuously repeated in spite of resolutions. It becomes stress, or boredom, or fatalism, or PTSD, eventually, I guess. If you know for sure this place has traps, it is also going to be a suspenseful time getting through that gauntlet. Obviously if you don't like characters dying without forewarning, this approach isn't for you. In other words, if you /like/ arbitrarilly killing off PCs without warning... ;P It doesn't have to be death though. Any permanent condition is pretty high stakes. I've also used traps that cut off limbs (in the game we play there isn't any kind of limb regeneration ability). (...and, I assume, no resurection?) In D&D, specifically, Death & Dismemberment are technically, with high enough level magic, temporary conditions. ;) One conclusion I reached a long time a...
  • 06:41 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    I realize this. I started playing in the 80s, so I've seen things develop over time. But even I forgot how NWPs felt in practice. When I went back to them, I was half doing so intending to do it as a laugh. But more importantly, a lot of people didn't start playing until recently (1995 was over 20 years ago). And plenty of people haven't tried 1E, let alone 2E. ...and it's not like trying it, now, would repell them from the hobby, and it would give them perspective, sure. But, as a fellow grognard who also started in the 80s, and later came back to D&D, I think your experience with going bck to 1e or 2e, is very much related to the fact it's going /back/. By the same token, I'd hope people would give the games you are advocating for a fair shake as well Well, that Aldarc & Pemerton & Manbearcat are advocating for. I was mainly just pointing out that those games are very much underdogs to D&D's traditional dominance as gatekeeper to the hobby. Underdogs need people pleading for others to g...
  • 05:47 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    I think this is a common problem for people running or playing Fate. Create an Advantage is slightly more unconventional than the other three actions. My problem was merely in remembering that it had been broken out from the general "make stuff up" vibe that permeates the game (and is not exactly foreign to RPGs in general, of course), categorized as an 'Action' (and that Fate had any formal 'action' at all, for that matter) and given a name. These may confer various advantages in different systems. In D&D 5E, you would possibly have advantage on the attack roll - but no double advantage - but that does not really affect the damage for a weapon attack. In 5e D&D creating the advantage of Advantage by stealthing up on your victim most certainly affects the damage for a weapon attack - if you're a Rogue. Symptomatic of a class-based system, that. And it's utterly conventional. Much of what makes these editions work for me in this respect is the lack of clear mechanics for certain thin...
  • 09:53 AM - Jhaelen quoted Bedrockgames in post Suspense in RPGs
    For me, the real threat of character death is a source of suspense or trepidation. There are other places for suspense in the game as well (it can occur around drama or just not knowing what is unfolding). But I quite like the classic experience of walking down hall, hoping a blade trap doesn't cut me in half or something.I agree about the former, but not about the latter: A character dying out of the blue because he didn't bother to check everything for traps is not something I enjoy*. I prefer it, if death results from combat encounters; ideally meaningful encounters. I don't fudge die rolls, so characters will occasionally die through no fault on the player's side, but I vastly prefer if they're forewarned and death is a consequence of their making bad decisions. (*: Well, you don't give any context: I dislike (death) traps in general and only use them if the characters have had the opportunity to gain hints about their existence. If they choose to cast all warnings aside, it serves them ...
  • 07:38 AM - AbdulAlhazred quoted Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    It is an entirely subjective thing, and frankly I am not 100% sure why I preferred NWPs (I am just trying to offer the best explanation I can think of). But I know they worked better for the game I wanted to run. I found this to be the case with a lot of 2E, and I think much of it had to do with the approach to play and the assumptions behind many fo the rules. You frame that somewhat negatively (as Gygaxian antagonism or something). Whatever was behind it (and I think antagonism is pretty reductive, because Gygax was all over the map if you read him, and he was pretty well excised from the 2E material), it made for a better Ravenloft campaign in my view. I struggled with Ravenloft during 3E. As soon as I switched editions, it just never felt the same. Something about the NWPs and other features, helped me get the feel that had originally drawn me to Ravenloft. Beyond that, we're just going to be going over the same series of points and rebuttals I think. Sure, I'm not trying to argue your experi...
  • 07:27 AM - AbdulAlhazred quoted Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    The reason I like that 2E NWPS don't scale up like 3E skills is that chances roughly stay consistent. In 3E you end up with tasks that are impossible unless you have an enormous bonus. That scale can really make things thorny in my view. Whereas with NWPs, the chance doesn't have this wide range of probability. Well, here we can agree! That is, 3e is borked up in many ways, and the actual PROGRESSION of bonuses is dumb. 4e doesn't have any of these problems. I don't think most of them break down to 50/50. I haven't crunched the numbers though, but that seems on the low side. Some of the NWPs do have a -2 check modifier, but not all of them. Most, if I recall fell between 0 to -1. With cropping up on some of them. But you can also take ranks in them. But if the probabilities are off, this is a pretty easy fix. What I like about it is the consistency, the lack of 3E style scaling, the fact that they don't interfere with aspects of role-play, investigation and exploration that I enjoy, and that a...
  • 03:23 AM - AbdulAlhazred quoted Bedrockgames in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    This is so dependent on which NWPs you choose to take though. Obviously if your taking a NWP tied to an ability score of 9 or something, your chances will be poor. In my experience, players tended to take NWPs that connected well with their abilities. And you can still increase your ranks in them. If you have a NWP for a skill that is 13 or higher for example, your chances are not that bad. Also, if the baseline is too low, I think it is reasonable to pad them with a couple of extra ranks or something. But why I liked them better than 3E skills was they were far less intrusive and they were so much more grounded. There wasn't this massive upward progression of scaling. It was just a roll against the ability score itself with some minor improvement in your rank over time. 2e's version is the MOST generous in terms of chances of success, but its still not THAT good, as the average stat is still a 13 or 14, which gives you somewhere as low as a 50/50 success rate, depending on the exact NWP (and lo...
  • 01:24 AM - Tony Vargas quoted Bedrockgames in post Suspense in RPGs
    The suspension is resolved by the die roll, and much of the suspense is set by the stakes involved. But you are going to have things leading up to it naturally in play. It isn't like you are just rolling a series of dice and saying what happened. People are explaining what they want to do, asking what they see, NPCs are responding. There is a lot that will be going on prompting the die roll in the first place (and it might not be a single die roll---depends on the situation). It isn't just a delay. What the players are doing leading up to that is definitely going to affect the roll. I mean, again without specifics it is hard to say, but if the players are trying to psych out the opponent or trying to cheat, that could result in a relevant penalty or bonus. Also they could be trying to get information if things are literally being resolved by the draw of the cards (which might be fitting if they are playing something like poker). The RP shouldn't just be stuff you say between the rolls, or just a ...


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