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Saturday, 21st March, 2015


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Tuesday, 23rd February, 2016

  • 05:55 PM - Morrus quoted lynnfredricks in post What's a Freelance RPG Writer Worth?
    Did you do an update or your original post? I just re-read it and found it extremely useful, and well, its been a year :-) I might do an updated version at some point When I next feel like being shouted at by people! :)

Tuesday, 10th November, 2015

  • 10:26 AM - delericho quoted lynnfredricks in post Onyx Path: Business As Usual... For Now, At Least
    This really doesn't mean a thing. Any time I have seen a company sold like this (assuming more than just the assets are changing hands), its followed by radical change in the following 6-12 months or so - no matter how calmly people say otherwise. The license agreements Onyx have no doubt have get-out clauses in the event that the IP is bought, but those will have time limits on them. So if Paradox do want to bring it back in-house, the clock is ticking. The buying company often wants to recoup the cost of the purchase quickly, and usually those who have existing counterparts in the purchasing company exit on their own or with help. That's true, but the money in WoD, like with RPGs in general, doesn't lie in the RPG but rather in the various potential spin-offs. I would be surprised if Paradox were particularly interested in the TT RPG - they're more likely to want to create their own video games, or license it out for a movie or three. If they've bought the properties in order to make ...

Tuesday, 13th October, 2015


Saturday, 18th July, 2015

  • 06:04 PM - Fildrigar quoted lynnfredricks in post The Demon Lords of Out of the Abyss
    Ill never accept the bull-in-the-china-shop Orcus. Bring back fat, extra goaty Orcus getting his belly rubbed down by succubi while he eats pork rinds in front a TV set. That's the real Orcus... Porkus?
  • 05:52 PM - Beleriphon quoted lynnfredricks in post The Demon Lords of Out of the Abyss
    Ill never accept the bull-in-the-china-shop Orcus. Bring back fat, extra goaty Orcus getting his belly rubbed down by succubi while he eats pork rinds in front a TV set. That's the real Orcus... I don't know, I always liked the 4E Demon Lord art. The orange mandrill look for Demogorgon was great.

Wednesday, 1st April, 2015

  • 07:04 AM - Raphael Pinthus quoted lynnfredricks in post BLUE ROSE Returns, Championing Diversity & Inclusiveness
    The problem is that there's a non-scholar political sort that has already created their own political narrative, and historical works, for them, exist only to validate their positions (and at the expense of the work or its author). Sadly its not particularly new. Thanks to the internet, the volume is though. This. It's like one would need to make some of those 2012 "Get Over It"-shirts. It's not a matter of education alone, or political intent alone, though; most people these days try to substitute fact-based debate with discourses about semantics, á la: "What's racism, really?" That's part of the reason why we apparently need a game that specifically endorses LGBT equality: Because it's not enough to say we're okay with it. We need to give detailed, pseudo-objective reasoning to our cause - since, apparently, simply stating that one doesn't mind boys kissing is not enough. I wonder how future generations will evaluate our present social discourse; like, it's not that they simply will...

Tuesday, 31st March, 2015

  • 07:10 AM - Jürgen Hubert quoted lynnfredricks in post BLUE ROSE Returns, Championing Diversity & Inclusiveness
    I don't think I have heard of anyone, anywhere say HPL wasn't a racist. But where arguments do seem to come up quite often recently is if his racism makes him not worth reading, or somehow, someone who enjoys Lovecraft's fictional works should somehow feel guilty about it. Also, that some people bring it up for the sole purpose of belittling his works and aggrandizing their own world view. HPL is a real easy target for that. That's not what I am saying at all, and neither does Kenneth Hite - he even wrote a role-playing game based on his works! (Trail of Cthulhu) But neither is the racism something we should ignore when either discussing Lovecraft or his works.
  • 06:11 AM - Jürgen Hubert quoted lynnfredricks in post BLUE ROSE Returns, Championing Diversity & Inclusiveness
    Lovecraft in his personal letters and in various writings would be considered extremely racist today; how racist he'd be considered in his time, is really debatable. Don't rely solely on depictions in the media, movies, etc that take creative license to tell a story. Here is what Kenneth Hite has to say - a scholar whose opinion I trust, not the least because he is an RPG author as well: 'This will do as well as anywhere as a place to remind a 21st century readership that Lovecraft’s racism is not somehow “separate” from his other thought, for all that it seldom takes the front row in his fictional themes. Lovecraft described himself as a blend of three streams of thought: an tiquarianism, scientism, and the weird. His racism fully partakes of the first two. He clearly believed that the Anglo-Saxon culture of roughly the 18th-century “Augustan Era” was the high point of human aesthetic achievement, and strongly self-identified with it. He was a “cultural” racist, who believed that cultural a...

Monday, 30th March, 2015

  • 07:38 PM - billd91 quoted lynnfredricks in post BLUE ROSE Returns, Championing Diversity & Inclusiveness
    Historically, academics - true scholars and scientists - judge a work on its own merits, or as a part of a body of work, and in context. The creator stands apart from that. That pretty much exposes this strain of historical literary criticism as incomplete (so much for those "true scholars and scientists"). It's impossible to divorce the creator from the context of the work and have a comprehensive context. Ultimately, this is why there are different methods and focuses of literary criticism, none of which have "The Answer" and all of which can inform the interested reader about the merits, context, and role of a particular work.

Tuesday, 24th March, 2015

  • 04:53 AM - Kiraya_TiDrekan quoted lynnfredricks in post BLUE ROSE Returns, Championing Diversity & Inclusiveness
    Please do not reduce people of a race/gender/sexual orientation into a stereotype, even for a frame of reference. In itself, I agree that it need not push anyone down, so long as the language used doesn't create a new frame of reference that places other games or players of other games in a negative light to differentiate itself. Do you agree? The setting (as I perceived it from the first edition) is inclusive. Some players are uncomfortable playing characters with a significantly different world view than themselves, but not all players. Its not a stereotype in this instance, its a demographic. A stereotype would be assigning a personality trait to the straight, white, male, cisgender gamer. Plenty of non-gamers do that on a regular basis; no need to perpetuate it here. Other companies and players and games need to have a negative light shone on them if they are indulging in negative stereotypes, bigotry, or discrimination. That said Mr. Pramas does not disparage any company, gro...
  • 03:27 AM - Morrus quoted lynnfredricks in post BLUE ROSE Returns, Championing Diversity & Inclusiveness
    I thought with the XXX it was clear the quotes were there for paraphrasing or emphasis rather than an actual, direct quote but Ill know better next time It's more that you're injecting entire things which aren't there and attributing them to people who didn't say them - and then castigating them for saying the things you yourself created. Nobody claimed their game was better than anybody else's, let alone for the reasons you ... errr ... "paraphrase". I think that's just in your head; it's certainly not on that page, either explicitly or implicitly.
  • 02:00 AM - Morrus quoted lynnfredricks in post BLUE ROSE Returns, Championing Diversity & Inclusiveness
    The game doesn't rub me the wrong way, but touting a game as "better than XXX for its inclusiveness" rubs many people the wrong way I think it's very fortunate that nobody has said that, then! :)

Tuesday, 3rd February, 2015

  • 09:32 AM - Mouseferatu quoted lynnfredricks in post What's a Freelance RPG Writer Worth?
    Its only exploitative if there's no other viable choice. Completely and utterly disagree. You're paying less than the work is worth; that's exploitive, AFAIAC. But we don't need to derail the thread with an exchange of "Yes, it is!" "No, it isn't!" Pretty sure I'm not going to change your view, and I've been doing this long enough, at varying rates of pay, to know for pretty certain that you're not going to change mine.

Wednesday, 24th September, 2014

  • 10:13 AM - Ryujin quoted lynnfredricks in post Art theft & copyright violation?
    I had a scumbag once who was giving away our content off of his parents business server in Canada. I faxed a a couple of letters to the business. He contacted us through our contact email with all sorts of threats of a lawsuit. I sent another one addressed to his dad and the illegal contest hosting went away. I did much the same thing, without going through the official process, when someone was using my pictures out of license and refused to respond to emails, or registered letters. In my case his entire site was taken down, though my content was just a fraction.
  • 01:16 AM - Morrus quoted lynnfredricks in post Art theft & copyright violation?
    It might be worth checking out where he is actually located. WHOIS shows a site registration via an Australian registrar but a US based registrant: Registrant Name: Julia Shipman Registrant Organization: Julia Shipman Registrant Street: 2105 Maple Street Registrant City: Lawrenceville Registrant State/Province: IL Registrant Postal Code: 62439 Registrant Country: US Registrant Phone: +1.6189433317 WHOIS often has bogus information, but sometimes people slip up. I had a scumbag once who was giving away our content off of his parents business server in Canada. I faxed a a couple of letters to the business. He contacted us through our contact email with all sorts of threats of a lawsuit. I sent another one addressed to his dad and the illegal contest hosting went away. No, that's not what I meant. I meant it sounds like it doesn't phase him. Take away some hosting, he moved elsewhere. There's a lot of hosts out there. Some of them in countries which are less receptive to takedown notices. It's li...

Wednesday, 18th December, 2013

  • 12:38 PM - Steve Conan Trustrum quoted lynnfredricks in post Art PACT: Paying freelancers in exposure
    That's possible when actual play testing happens. But then you do find reviewers (over on rpg.net for example) who are reviewing without a full play through to the end - there is just the assumption of length of volume = length of play.Well, and I hate to say it, but I think there's also an above normal sense of entitlement in this market because of the incomparable degree to which customers may interact with the people putting out product for them. I've seen arguments made more than once, in all seriousness, about how if there's not a lot of money to be had in the industry, and if the people making games do it because they enjoy it, then games should be priced at their production cost.
  • 05:03 AM - Steve Conan Trustrum quoted lynnfredricks in post Art PACT: Paying freelancers in exposure
    That's something I think is particular to the tabletop RPG market - quite interesting if you think about it. All reviews will have a page count, and when a font and margins are particularly large and noted, it implies volume = value. Maybe we are conditioned to this by the low page counts of early modules. But then, take into account the actual volume of material for the size. You have small sized printed books (Lamentations of the Flame Princess, ICONS, etc) - the actual font size can be smaller than a large format book, but they cannot be proportionately smaller without impacting readability. It probably makes better sense, if you are measuring by volume to measure by word count.I imagine it's due to the fact that a RPG book, as opposed to a novel or the like, is interactive. It's like someone saying "that was a good video game -- lots of fun -- but it only lasted four hours, so I had to give it a negative review overall."
  • 02:15 AM - Morrus quoted lynnfredricks in post Art PACT: Paying freelancers in exposure
    Artists are in the same boat as other creatives, and always have been - same with writers and musicians. Art (which I refer to in its broadest sense) has always been a gamble. It's a risky, unreliable choice of living with a small chance of returning enormous dividends. For every Tom Hanks there are 10,000 actors waiting tables; for every Dan Brown, there are 1,000,000 hopeful novelists; for every Justin Bieber there are 5,000,000 people scrawling by in bands hoping to make it big. Art (in the narrow sense) shares that fate. It's the curse of independent creators selling luxury services. And with increasingly low barriers to entry, the competition is fiercer than ever. Being a creative type is *hard*!

Monday, 16th December, 2013

  • 06:28 PM - Steve Conan Trustrum quoted lynnfredricks in post Art PACT: Paying freelancers in exposure
    I think that's possible but I think its more complicated than that. In the case you referenced with Palladium for example, you have fans of those their work who will overlook it, because its never been great (with the exception of some covers) and they've acclimated to 30 years of crap. Those customers are, relatively speaking, easy sells. Selling to the same person again and again is far, far easier than acquiring new customers. If Palladium started escalating the quality of their art, like Paizo and Wizards has, they may start getting new customers.I'm thinking more in terms of recycling art time and again across various products. With Palladium, it isn't even a matter of the same pieces showing up across several different publishers -- it's the same company using the same art, so the chance of a negative reaction is enhanced because of the market focus, yet people keep buying because art, although a marketing factor, is not key to a typical gamer's buying decisions. Oh, the primary goal is...
  • 12:54 PM - Steve Conan Trustrum quoted lynnfredricks in post Art PACT: Paying freelancers in exposure
    What jives with me is that my company licenses content to others, including stock art, and is very successful at it. We've licensed some content to RPG companies but most of our content licensing revenue comes from other sources. I don't demonize stock art in general and do not draw the conclusions you apparently think I draw. I do demonize the overuse of specific stock art images or using particularly cheap looking stock art. If someone can tell its stock art because they've seen it again and again, they won't love you for it. But if you are modifying the art significantly, then there's a better chance they won't know. What's important is that the art looks fresh and professional. If it looks fresh then, well, its fresh. You clearly made an effort to freshen that zombie. Don't fool yourself that your customers are going to tell you every little thing that is wrong (or right) with your product. Often customers just do not give a crap to comment - they just don't buy again from you. Id also...


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