The Vile Darkness of VonGlauss Mansion [Levels 5-7; Haunted House]

The Vile Darkness of VonGlauss Mansion [Levels 5-7; Haunted House]

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The Vile Darkness of VonGlauss Mansion [Levels 5-7; Haunted House]


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After the death of Victor VonGlauss, the mysteries behind his powers and horrible experiments begin to unravel. Can the players solve the riddles of VonGlauss Mansion and live to tell the tale?

A D&D Next Adventure for 3-5 players of levels 5-7.
By A.A. Amirault with designs and drawings by Marion Marchant.
  1. seankreynolds
    The criteria I'm looking for are:
    (A) encounters that play up various party roles (martial, skill, magic, etc.)
    (B) whether the adventure sites have a reasonable ecology (what, no bathrooms?)
    (C) the narrative flow of the overall adventure.

    There are some homonym errors in this adventure (morning/mourning, death throws/death throes) that the author should watch out for.

    The fact that this adventure has the ghost of an infant, and a combat encounter with the zombified body of that infant, might disturb people beyond their comfort level for a roleplaying game.

    (A) There are a reasonable number of combat encounters to satisfy martial characters, although they might become bored with all the searching necessary in the other rooms.

    There are plenty of traps in this adventure, but it's not called out how a trap-oriented character is supposed to recognize that these are traps, or how to disable them if they do; the traps just happen and characters get a roll to avoid the consequences. This becomes a little tedious as the traps are keyed to the various metal letters in the rooms, which the PCs have to acquire to solve the adventure, so they're just forced to soak up the damage and mitigate it with saving throws.
    Similarly, there are some metal letters that can only be accessed in the exact way the author wants them to be accessed (such as the one in the baby's room, which is in a "hopelessly locked" and presumably unbreakable toy chest, which the baby ghost opens once you interact with her, or the secret panel in the rocking chair room that doesn't have a DC to find it but opens if you rock in the rocking chair).

    There aren't a lot of opportunities for characters to use knowledge or magical abilities to overcome obstacles.

    (B) As this place is sealed up and nobody lives here except for magical guardians (I'd include the mimic in this category) and undead, it doesn't need an active ecology. But it does include a bathroom for the original living inhabitants, so that's nice.

    (C) There isn't much of a narrative flow other than the need to gather all the key pieces. The PCs can wander as they see fight, and might have to backtrack for a critical item (such as the baby's doll), but most of it is PC-initiated exploration, and the last of it is a linear path through three rooms to the final encounter.

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