Art How to Paint Minis the Bruce Campbell Way* - Page 3





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  1. #21
    I gave that greybrushing technique on some minis recently and it's worked wonders!
    As soon as my camera is working (or I get a new camera) I'll have to show 'em off for critique.

 

  • #22
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    I've always primed with white in the past, and can testify to the irritation on missing little spots (that stuck out like a sore thumb).

    I will begin this greybrushing tonight! Got a box o pewters to test it out on, anyway.

    Awesome thread, BTW. Your skill trumps mine (I've painted the same elf wizard as your second image... let's just say mine's not ending up online for comparison )
    SAVE HOBART!

  • #23
    Quote Originally Posted by tallyrand View Post
    the first here is the second miniature i ever painted, the first one did not belong to me, a friend lent it to me, so i could try out painting them for myself. I painted this guy pretty much from my list of things not to do. He was unprimed, painted with Testor's high gloss enamel model paints using a plastic bristled brush.
    Not too bad for a first try though. I started out by painting my HeroQuest minis, and I made the mistake of using Testor's on bare plastic too. Some of those don't look too bad, but they're not great. I got better after reading a Dragon article on painting that introduced me to acryllics, priming, and drybrushing. So after reading that, I picked up three sets of acryllic paint that was made by Testors, there was a basic primary color set, an auto detailing set, and a set for model ariplanes and stuff that had stuff like olive drab, gray, and tan. Those paints worked better, but some were glossy and looked like crap if used wrong. The flat paint was better and looked pretty good, and I eventually added a few other colors I needed. My palette was somewhat limited, but I'm ok at mixing colors if I need them. I haven't used them in a while though, so I imagine most of them have probably dried out. I might be able to revive some of them with some water, another one of the pluses to acryllic. The brushes were mostly cheap crappy brushes, but I added a few better brushes for detail work, and I still use the crap brushes for stuff like priming or inking where I'm more interested in covering as much of the mini as possible.

    Now here is the secret, here is how to get the best of both worlds of prime, and more when it comes to prepping your minis: the Greybrush.
    Interesting. I usually start with a flat white prime, do a base coat, ink it with watered down flat black, drybrush the whole thing with white, then drybrush the rest of the colors. I'll have to try that method, looks like it can save some time.

    Here's some half painted ones:
    That's pretty good. Most of my best figures look a bit like that, though complete of course. I'm not really interested in doing award winning work on the minis, but I also don't want them to look like crap, and I have a decent eye for detail. Most of my minis are closer to your battlefield standard though, I'm generally more careful with unique PC-type minis

    EDIT: that reminds me, before you start painting, wash your hands! You don't know where they've been, and you don't want the grubb form your grubby mitts to get all over your awesome mini.
    That always helps. I wash my hands a lot when I'm working on game stuff, because I don't like stuff like Cheeto dust getting on my campaign notes. I like to write my stuff up by hand. The same thing goes for minis, dirt, oil, sweat and all kinds of crap can mess up a paint job.

    the pliers on the left hand side are there because the old GW paintpots are less than cooperative when it comes to opening once paint dries in the grooves of the caps.
    I've been there. I learned the hard way to be careful with the pliers too, because too much pressure can crush in part of the lid, and then it builds up rust which contaminates the paint. When a lid is stuck, I usually dip on of the junk brushes in my wash solution, and rub it around the inside of the lid to soften it up a bit first. If the dried paint isn't too bad, sometimes that even does the trick.


    You also need at least 2 cups of brush water that you are willing to sacrifice to the cause, I use disposable red party cups.
    I use water with a little bit of alcohol and soap added to help clean up the brush.

    Quote Originally Posted by tallyrand View Post

    Thou Shalt Not Leave Thine Brushes Sitting in the Water.
    I don't even let go of the brushes when I'm cleaning them off and let the tips touch the bottom of the cup for that reason. I just swirl the brush around real good, wipe it off on a paper towel and repeat until there's not color left. Then I dry the brush off really good, because the excess water will thin the paint out and weaken the coverage.

    If I had a working digital camera, I'd probably share some of my better paint jobs in this thread.
    PbP info here: http://www.enworld.org/forum/5396456-post81.html

  • #24
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    I tried out the black/greybrushing this weekend with some solid results!

    As soon as I get some batteries in my camera I'll post some pics. The black really darkened up the minis quite nicely; I often felt the white basecoat left a "bright sheen" making the mini seem to have no depth.

    My skill is still amature at best, but these techniques did seem to help quite a bit! Thanks!
    SAVE HOBART!

  • #25
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    Where did this thread go? I was really enjoying it and the timing couldn't have been better. I'm trying to build up a ton of mini's for my new campaign and was interested in trying these methods.

  • #26
    What with one thing or another, I've been letting things slack off here. I have a batch of re-painted-pre-painted plastic minis that I'll put up in the next couple of days.

    I have yet to find a way to successfully strip these things, so they are all primed over the origional paint job.

    Currently I'm working on a technique for enhancing a pre-painted palstic mini without doing a full re paint, certainly this is a focus on speed over quality, but I have had a couple of interestig results.

    I was reading over on the Reaper boards, and believe me, some of those guys are hard core, and a couple things they do is wet blending, and use really thin paints with all kinds of flow extenders and such added that they say it can take hours or even days for the paint to dry. One solution they have to this, in order to protect the model, is they will hit the mini with a matte sealer between their different painting stages.

    This got me thinking, one of the things that make me cringe is hearing some people saying that you can just paint straight on the pre-painted plastic, this works about as well as nailing Jell-O to the wall, but it got me thinking, what if I just hit the Pre-painted mini with a matte sealer, and paint over that, the sealer giving the paint something to "grip" onto, and from there, just add highlights or minor color changes and such, use some inks to add depth and so on.

    The other reason I am kinda excited about this idea, is that it preserves the one thing that I think the pre-painted plastics actually bring to the table, which is the clear/translucent effects that are impossible with metal minis, or are lost by simply priming over the plastic, I had previously considered trying to preserve these effects by covering them with rubber cement before priming, but I think this will work better.

    I'll have some pics up in the next couple of days...pinky schwear!
    How_To Paint_Minis_the_Bruce_Campbell_Way*

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  • #27
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    When I hit some of the WOTC figures with matte spray to do as you suggested it clouded some of the transparent bits. You might want to mask them before spraying. Good luck!

  • #28
    I'm hoping to reverse the clouding issue by either using a gloss sealer over it, or a brush on gloss varnish once the mini is done.

    When I'm getting really nutty over a mini, I'll use paint on gloss varnish over the final matte sealer on things like gems, lips and eyes to bring out their luster again.
    How_To Paint_Minis_the_Bruce_Campbell_Way*

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  • #29
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    Circvs Maximvs Forgotten Realms D&D

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    The problem I've found when re-painting D&D pre-painted minis, is that even one or two layers of paint (or sealer) raises the surface enough that you start to lose the definition from features. Especially facial features. Faces on the pre-painted minis are one of the parts that needs the most work (very little shaping and highlighting in WotC painting, and many times the eyes aren't even painted where they are supposed to be). Even one layer of paint on the face, in order to repaint the features properly, raises the surface enough that it's extremely hard to find where the eyes go again.

    How do you put the paint or sealer on thin enough to serve your purposes, but not thick enough to ruin definition of features?

  • #30
    The best I can recommend is a light prime, and thin paints

    In my case, mini snob that I am, Most of the pre-painted plastics that I work on are monsters/creatures who usually have more sharply incised features. Most of my PC types are metal. However I did work on a tiefling mini for one of the players in my group, and the thing's face was a train wreck. About the best you can hope for is to use colors with greater contrast than you would normally use to give the illusion of greater depth, and it may even have to descend into the realms of freehand work for more details, like lips and eyebrows and so on.

    Most of it boils down to the simple mantra "You can't polish a turd."
    How_To Paint_Minis_the_Bruce_Campbell_Way*

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