D&D 4th Edition Monster Design in D&D Next - Page 4




+ Log in or register to post
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 69
  1. #31
    Registered User
    Waghalter (Lvl 7)

    Boarstorm's Avatar

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    West Texas
    Posts
    743

    Ignore Boarstorm
    Quote Originally Posted by Morrus View Post
    I'm playing in the playtest rather than running it, so I haven't looked at the DM stuff. Does it tell you when to level up?
    The Pregens have a note about when to level up on their sheets.
    If my post comes off as unnecessarily snarky, it's because I have a disability.

    I'm a chronic smart@$$.

 

  • #32
    4ognard
    Spellbinder (Lvl 16)

    TerraDave's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    A Nation's Capitol
    Posts
    6,514
    I Defended The Walls!

    Ignore TerraDave
    Quote Originally Posted by Philousk View Post
    ... if the hook horror impaled a high level character that would be stark naked?...
    Oh, I thought about that. (though maybe I shouldn't have).

    Imagine what you will.
    A semi-brief History of D&D and some other RPGs: Part 1: 1967-1979 Part 2: 1980-1989
    All the official stuff for 4e
    Bonus:

    4E has rituals, use them, they're magic;
    Want to see the greatest thing you will ever see? then click;
    You can use Earth as a D&D setting;
    Origins of The Rouse; (look for it)
    The Rouse responds; (look for it)
    One can appreciate both old and new D&D.

  • #33
    Potassium-Rich Moderator
    A 1e title so awesome it's not in the book (Lvl 21)

    Kamikaze Midget's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Boston-ish
    Posts
    12,727
    Blog Entries
    24

    Ignore Kamikaze Midget
    I gotta confess, I am smitten by the Hook Horror in general.

    I don't even know why. Something about a big beetle with hook-hands who climbs around and jumps down onto people is kind of amazing in my head.

    This design hits all the thigh notes from the Hook Horror. Looking at how it was presented before and deriving from that the basic mechanics is the smart way to do it.

    If there's something missing, IMO, it's the element of surprise. Hook horrors are hunters (heh), they spring unseen, catch their prey by surprise, and drag them away. An encounter with a hook horror should have the psychological arc of a slasher horror scene: the party slowly becomes aware that they are being followed by something in the darkness, but don't catch a glimpse of it until it springs from the shadows at the smallest and weakest looking party member, grabbing them and dragging them off to the larder in the darkness, leaving only a slick trail of blood and the distant screams of the hapless adventurer.

    This might just be advocating for better surprise mechanics in general, but that's part and parcel of the combat-as-war mentality, I guess. Surprise SHOULD play a crucial role in combat, especially in combat against a creature that is hunting you. That's why the HH's echolocation is important: it can detect you, without you detecting it.

    But anyway, this Hook Horror hits most of the high notes of my beloved critter nicely enough that I'm confident they're on the right path of the design.
    -- Jacob J Driscoll, dating your mom.---
    "The king of the jungle was asleep in his car..."
    Most Recent Article: FREE ADVENTURE, DUDE!
    FINAL FANTASY ZERO
    finalfantasyzero.wikidot.com
    Also, game-style musings:
    daedaluswing.wikidot.com

  • #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Gilladian View Post
    In my reading of this, I am as confused as always with monster multi-attacks. When he hits, he does normal to hit damage, and the foe is impaled. Does the impale damage happen in the same round? the next round? Every round thereafter? The bite is automatic... does it happen the same round as the hit? The next round? Does the poor victim take BOTH impale and bite damage every round? Huh??
    My interpretation based on what little we know would be this:

    Since "Twist and bite" is listed as a "Special Action" it takes the creatures action for the turn, so it would not happen automatically. Since it seems to be all part of the same action I think the PC takes both kinds of damage each round. The only reasons I can think of to separate the auto damage is that if you have something like resist all or DR, it would apply against both damage sources.

    The bombs fell. Billions died. Generations past. Now it's your chance. Can you rebuild this Broken Earth? Now available for Savage Worlds and Pathfinder RPG.

  • #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Gilladian View Post
    In my reading of this, I am as confused as always with monster multi-attacks. When he hits, he does normal to hit damage, and the foe is impaled. Does the impale damage happen in the same round? the next round? Every round thereafter? The bite is automatic... does it happen the same round as the hit? The next round? Does the poor victim take BOTH impale and bite damage every round? Huh??
    My read is that, on a hit from a hook, the target takes 1d10+4 damage and is impaled (i.e. an "impaled" condition is imposed). The "Impaled" rules say how you a character can un-impale himself.

    "Twist and Bite" is listed as a "Special Action", so I assume that it takes an action for the hook horror to perform it. Essentially, if it gets around to a hook horror's turn and the horror still has one (or two!) impaled victims, the horror can do standard piercing damage (1d10+4) for free on each impaled victim (that's the "twist" I take it) and also do 2d6+4 bite damage on one impaled victim (that's the "bite").

    Overall, this seems like a reasonable rules structure for a monster where the hit escalates the danger. It would also be a good idea if the hook horrors commonly tried dragging their hooked victims away.

    -KS

    Edit: Leaving this response in edit mode without hitting post for two hours is just asking to be ninja-ed.

  • #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Morrus View Post
    Interesting position to take. Which level advancement chart are you basing that on?
    Well, for my part, I'm basing it on 2e. A 2e Orc was worth 15 xp, while the play test Orc is worth 125 xp, that smells a lot like the 10 encounters per level way of thinking and I dislike it.

    That being said I'm also a proponent of xp for gold so I might be a bit biased when I comes to monsters xp, I just don't want my players to see wandering monsters as a surprise xp present, when they spot a band of trolls crashing through the forest they should hide, not run headlong into a fight expecting to come out of it unharmed because the DMG talks about building "balanced" encounters.

    I want to nip those game expectations in the bud, monsters are there to be a challenge, not a reward.

    Warder
    I LIKE COMBAT AS WAR!!!!!!

    the essence of D&D is "The thrill of victory the agony of a natural 1" - Mike Mearls, Gen Con 2012

    Starting From the Ground Up - ACKS Economic system
    Starting From the Grounds Up, Part II - ACKS Economic system

  • #37
    The Guvnor
    Orcus on an Off-Day (Lvl 22)

    Morrus's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    24,856
    Blog Entries
    4
    13th Age Superman Circvs Maximvs ENnies Pathfinder ZEITGEIST Doctor Who

    Ignore Morrus
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackwarder View Post
    Well, for my part, I'm basing it on 2e. A 2e Orc was worth 15 xp, while the play test Orc is worth 125 xp,
    But you can't possibly compare them without the matching advancement table. What if in 5E level 2 comes at 50,000 XP? In that case, you'd say the XP awards were too low.

  • #38
    Registered User
    The Grand Druid (Lvl 20)

    the Jester's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Shingletown, CA 96088
    Posts
    20,670

    Ignore the Jester
    EDIT: Nevermind the specifics.
    the Jester

    The Monster Project

    Buy my first self-published weird sci-fi novel from Amazon here!

  • #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Morrus View Post
    But you can't possibly compare them without the matching advancement table. What if in 5E level 2 comes at 50,000 XP? In that case, you'd say the XP awards were too low.
    The pregen characters need 2000 xp to 2nd level, 2e characters needed between 1250 xp (thief) to 2500 xp (wizard) to 2nd level.

    Now I admit that the pregens need 6000 xp to get to 3rd level and that's a lot compared to 2e but I still think that without being able to see the rest of the advancement table (assuming that it's part of an advancement table and not just random numbers thrown down just for the playtest) the monsters xp is high.

    Warder
    I LIKE COMBAT AS WAR!!!!!!

    the essence of D&D is "The thrill of victory the agony of a natural 1" - Mike Mearls, Gen Con 2012

    Starting From the Ground Up - ACKS Economic system
    Starting From the Grounds Up, Part II - ACKS Economic system

  • #40
    Registered User
    Magsman (Lvl 14)

    Li Shenron's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Edition-shifting
    Posts
    9,913
    Forgotten Realms Planescape Rokugan D&D

    Ignore Li Shenron
    Quote Originally Posted by Stormonu View Post
    The design sounds pretty straight-forward; for the purposes of designing a monster for a combat encounter, should work fine.

    It's interesting to note monsters, at this time, aren't given skills. As broad as skills are going to be, I think that's a shame. I'd like to see kobolds with skill at trapmaking, bugbears with stealth, gnolls with tracking, sphinxes with skills in riddles, etc., to at least suggest uses beyond straight-up combat.
    It's been mentioned already that currently monsters are far from finished, but I agree with your sentiment.

    Personally I've always liked richly detailed monsters, with abilities that extend beyond combat. I remember I even defended a long time ago the presence of Read Magic at will in the 3.0 Balor's description

    Out-of-combat stats and abilities aren't generally useful to monsters, with the important exception of stealth and perception, and maybe sense motive (which are still used for the non-combat version or phase of an encounter). But they really help defining the nature, role in the world, and "feel" of a monster IMHO! Plus, they are needed by those groups which allow monsters as PC or at least as mercenaries/allies NPC.

    It's totally understandable that the average group would find such non-combat abilities a waste of paper... but still I'd really like to have them for the purposes above. The best thing that can happen, is that they design an excellent monster description format where all the non-combat stuff is nicely placed so that it doesn't disturb those who don't want to bother with it.
    "There is no survival without order, there is no evolution without chaos."
    "You have to see past the RAW to understand the rules of the game."
    "And rules are OVERRATED by the way!

  • + Log in or register to post
    Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. [4e] Monster Design - a flying monster built to fight on the wing.
      By catastrophic in forum D&D and Pathfinder
      Replies: 4
      Last Post: Tuesday, 13th September, 2011, 02:24 AM
    2. Dragon 372 - Design & Development: Monster Design
      By Shroomy in forum RPGs & Tabletop Gaming Discussion
      Replies: 1
      Last Post: Friday, 13th February, 2009, 07:51 AM
    3. my first try at monster design
      By eleran in forum D&D and Pathfinder
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: Thursday, 3rd April, 2008, 05:00 AM
    4. Monster Design Contest
      By Ishmayl in forum D&D and Pathfinder
      Replies: 5
      Last Post: Sunday, 3rd December, 2006, 09:37 PM
    5. Design this monster and win a prize!
      By Kunimatyu in forum RPGs & Tabletop Gaming Discussion
      Replies: 4
      Last Post: Sunday, 22nd May, 2005, 10:08 PM

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •