The weapons covered here are grouped into three categories based on their general utility: ranged weapons, explosives and splash weapons, and melee weapons.


Ranged Weapons

Ranged weapons fall into three general groups: handguns, longarms, and other ranged weapons such as crossbows.
When using a ranged weapon, the wielder applies his or her Dexterity modifier to the attack roll.
Handguns and longarms are personal firearms. A personal firearm is any firearm designed to be carried and used by a single person.
Ranged Weapons Table

Ranged weapons are described by a number of statistics, as shown on Table: Ranged Weapons.
Damage: The damage the weapon deals on a successful hit.
Critical: The threat range for a critical hit. If the threat is confirmed, a weapon deals double damage on a critical hit (roll damage twice, as if hitting the target two times).
Damage Type: Ranged weapon damage is classified according to type: ballistic (all firearms), energy (of a specific type), piercing (some simple ranged weapons), or slashing (a whip). Some creatures or characters may be resistant or immune to some forms of damage.
Range Increment: Any attack at less than this distance is not penalized for range. However, each full range increment causes a cumulative –2 penalty on the attack roll. Ranged weapons have a maximum range of ten range increments, except for thrown weapons, which have a maximum range of five range increments.
Rate of Fire: Some ranged weapons have a rate of fire of 1, which simply means they can be employed once per round and then must be reloaded or replaced. Firearms, which operate through many different forms of internal mechanisms, have varying rates of fire. The three possible rates of fire for handguns, longarms, and heavy weapons are single shot, semiautomatic, and automatic.
Single Shot: A weapon with the single shot rate of fire requires the user to manually operate the action (the mechanism that feeds and cocks the weapon) between each shot. Pump shotguns and bolt-action rifles are examples of firearms with single shot rates of fire. A weapon with the single shot rate of fire can fire only one shot per attack, even if the user has a feat or other ability that normally allow more than one shot per attack.
Semiautomatic (S): Most firearms have the semiautomatic rate of fire. These firearms feed and cock themselves with each shot. A semiautomatic weapon fires one shot per attack (effectively acting as a single shot weapon), but some feats allow characters armed with semiautomatic weapons to fire shots in rapid successions, getting in more than one shot per attack.
Automatic (A): Automatic weapons fire a burst or stream of shots with a single squeeze of the trigger. Only weapons with the automatic rate of fire can be set on autofire or be used with feats that take advantage of automatic fire.
Magazine: The weapon’s magazine capacity and type are given in this column. The amount of ammunition a weapon carries, and hence how many shots it can fire before needing to be reloaded, is determined by its magazine capacity. How the firearm is reloaded depends upon its magazine type. The number in this entry is the magazine’s capacity in shots; the word that follows the number indicates the magazine type: box, cylinder, or internal. A fourth type, linked, has an unlimited capacity; for this reason the entry does not also have a number. Weapons with a dash in this column have no magazines; they are generally thrown weapons, or weapons (such as bows) that are loaded as part of the firing process.
Box: A box magazine is any type of magazine that can be removed and reloaded separately from the weapon.
Cylinder: A revolver keeps its ammunition in a cylinder, which is part of the weapon and serves as the firing chamber for each round as well. Unlike box magazines, cylinders can’t be removed, and they must be reloaded by hand. However, most revolvers can be used with a speed loader. Using a speed loader is much like inserting a box magazine into a weapon. Without a speed loader, a firearm with a cylinder magazine must be loaded by hand.
Internal: Some weapons keep their ammunition in an internal space, which must be loaded by hand. This is the case with most shotguns, as well as some rifles.
Linked: Some machine guns use linked ammunition. The bullets are chained together with small metal clips, forming a belt. Typically, a belt holds 50 bullets; any number of belts can be clipped together. In military units, as the gunner fires, an assistant clips new ammunition belts together, keeping the weapon fed.
Size: Size categories for weapons and other objects are defined differently from the size categories for creatures. The relationship between a weapon’s size and that of its wielder defines whether it can be used one-handed, if it requires two hands, and if it’s a light weapon.
A Medium-size or smaller weapon can be used one-handed or two-handed. A Large weapon requires two hands. A Huge weapon requires two hands and a bipod or other mount.
A Small or smaller weapon is considered a light weapon. It can be used one-handed and, as a light weapon, is easier to use in your off hand.
Weight: This column gives the weapon’s weight when fully loaded.
Purchase DC: This is the purchase DC for a Wealth check to acquire the weapon. This number reflects the base price and doesn’t include any modifier for purchasing the weapon on the black market.
Restriction: The restriction rating for the weapon, if any, and the appropriate black market purchase DC modifier. Remember to apply this modifier to the purchase DC when making a Wealth check to acquire the weapon on the black market.
Reloading Firearms

Reloading a firearm with an already filled box magazine or speed loader is a move action. Refilling a box magazine or a speed loader, or reloading a revolver without a speed loader or any weapon with an internal magazine, is a full-round action.
Loading a belt of linked ammunition is a full-round action. Linking two belts together is a move action.

Table: Ranged Weapons

Weapon
Damage
Critical Damage Type Range Increment Rate of Fire Magezine Size Weight Purchase DC Restriction
Hanguns (requires the Personal Firearms Proficiency feat)
Beretta 92F (9mm autoloader) 2d6 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S 15 box Small 3 lb. 16 Lic (+1)
Beretta 93R (9mm machine pistol) 2d6 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S,A 20 box Med 3 lb. 18 Res (+2)
Colt Double Eagle (10mm autoloader) 2d6 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 9 box Small 3 lb. 16 Lic (+1)
Colt M1911 (.45 autoloader) 2d6 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 7 box Small 3 lb. 15 Lic (+1)
Colt Python1 (.357 revolver) 2d6 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S 6 cyl. Med 3 lb. 15 Lic (+1)
Derringer (.45) 2d6 20 Ballistic 10 ft. Single 2 int. Tiny 1 lb. 14 Lic (+1)
Desert Eagle (.50AE autoloader) 2d8 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S 8 box Med 4 lb. 18 Lic (+1)
Glock 171 (9mm autoloader) 2d6 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 17 box Small 2 lb. 18 Lic (+1)
Glock 201 (10mm autoloader) 2d6 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S 15 box Small 3 lb. 18 Lic (+1)
MAC Ingram M10 (.45 machine pistol) 2d6 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S,A 30 box Med 6 lb. 15 Res (+2)
Pathfinder (.22 revolver) 2d4 20 Ballistic 20 ft. S 6 cyl. Tiny 1 lb. 14 Lic (+1)
Ruger Service-Six (.38S revolver) 2d6 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 6 cyl. Small 2 lb. 14 Lic (+1)
S&W M29 (.44 magnum revolver) 2d8 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 6 cyl. Med 3 lb. 15 Lic (+1)
SITES M9 (9mm autoloader) 2d6 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 8 box Tiny 2 lb. 15 Lic (+1)
Skorpion (.32 machine pistol) 2d4 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S,A 20 box Med 4 lb. 17 Res (+2)
TEC-9 (9mm machine pistol) 2d6 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S or A 32 box Med 4 lb. 14 Res (+2)
Walther PPK (.32 autoloader) 2d4 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 7 box Small 1 lb. 15 Lic (+1)
Longarms (requires the Personal Firearms Proficiency feat)
AKM/AK-47 (7.62mmR assault rifle) 2d8 20 Ballistic 70 ft. S,A 30 box Large 10 lb. 15 Res (+2)
Barrett Light Fifty (.50 sniper rifle) 2d12 20 Ballistic 120 ft. S 11 box Huge 35 lb. 22 Lic (+1)
Benelli 121 M1 (12-gague shotgun) 2d8 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S 7 int Large 8 lb. 17 Lic (+1)
Beretta M3P (12-gauge shotgun) 2d8 20 Ballistic 30 ft. S 5 box Large 9 lb. 16 Lic (+1)
Browning BPS (10-gauge shotgun) 2d10 20 Ballistic 30 ft. Single 5 int. Large 11 lb. 16 Lic (+1)
HK G3 (7.62mm assault rifle) 2d10 20 Ballistic 90 ft. S,A 20 box Large 11 lb. 19 Res (+2)
HK MP51 (9mm submachine gun) 2d6 20 Ballistic 50 ft. S,A 30 box Large 7 lb. 20 Res (+2)
HK MP5K (9mm submachine gun) 2d6 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S,A 15 box Med 5 lb. 19 Res (+2)
HK PSG11 (7.62mm sniper rifle) 2d10 20 Ballistic 90 ft. S 5 box Large 16 lb. 22 Lic (+1)
M16A2 (5.56mm assault rifle) 2d8 20 Ballistic 80 ft. S,A 30 box Large 8 lb. 16 Res (+2)
M4 Carbine (5.56mm assault rifle) 2d8 20 Ballistic 60 ft. S,A 30 box Large 7 lb. 16 Res (+2)
M-60 (medium machine gun) 2d10 20 Ballistic 100 ft. A Linked Huge 22 lb. 21 Mil (+3)
Mossberg (12-gauge shotgun) 2d8 20 Ballistic 30 ft. Single 6 int. Large 7 lb. 15 Lic (+1)
Remington 700 (7.62mm hunting rifle) 2d10 20 Ballistic 80 ft. Single 5 int. Large 8 lb. 17 Lic (+1)
Sawed-off shotgun (12-ga shotgun) 2d8 20 Ballistic 10 ft. S 2 int. Med 4 lb. 15 Illegal (+4)
Steyr AUG (5.56mm assault rifle) 2d8 20 Ballistic 80 ft. S,A 30 box Large 9 lb. 19 Res (+2)
Uzi (9mm submachine gun) 2d6 20 Ballistic 40 ft. S,A 20 box Large 8 lb. 18 Res (+2)
Winchester 94 (.444 hunting rifle) 2d10 20 Ballistic 90 ft. S 6 int. Large 7 lb. 15 Lic (+1)
Heavy Weapons (each requires a specific Exotic Firearms Proficiency feat)
M2HB (heavy machine gun) 2d12 20 Ballistic 110 ft. A Linked Huge 75 lb. 22 Mil (+3)
M72A3 LAW (rocket launcher) 10d62 - - 150 ft. 1 1 int. Large 5 lb. 15 Mil (+3)
M79 (grenade launcher) Varies2 - - 70 ft. 1 1 int. Large 7 lb. 14 Mil (+3)
Other Ranged Weapons (Weapons Proficiency feat needed given in parentheses)
Compound bow (Archaic)2 1d8 20 Piercing 40 ft. 1 - Large 3 lb. 10 -
Crossbow (Simple) 1d10 19-20 Piercing 40 ft. 1 1 int. Med 7 lb. 9 -
Flamethrower (no feat needed)3 3d6 - Fire - 1 10 int. Large 50 lb. 17 Mil (+3)
Javelin (Simple) 1d6 20 Piercing 30 ft. 1 - Med 2 lb. 4 -
Pepper spray (Simple) Special2 - Special2 5 ft. 1 1 int. Tiny 0.5 lb. 5 -
Shuriken (Archaic) 1 20 Piercing 10 ft. 1 - Tiny 0.5 lb. 3 -
Taser (Simple) 1d42 - Electricity 5 ft. 1 1 int. Small 2 lb. 7 -
Whip (Simple) 1d2 20 Slashing 15 ft.3 1 - Small 2 lb. 4 -
1 This mastercraft weapon grants a +1 bonus on attack rolls
2 This weapon does special damage. See the weapon description.
3 See the description of this weapon for special rules.
Handguns

A handgun is a personal firearm that can be used one-handed without penalty. This includes all pistols and some submachine guns and shotguns. All handguns require the Personal Firearms Proficiency feat. Using a handgun without this feat imposes a –4 penalty on attack rolls.
Handguns can be broken down into three smaller groups: autoloaders, revolvers, and machine pistols.
Autoloaders (sometimes called “automatics”) feature removable box magazines, and some models hold quite a lot of ammunition. They work by using the energy of a shot fired to throw back a slide, eject the shot’s shell casing, and scoop the next round into the chamber. They are more complex than revolvers, but nevertheless have become increasingly popular in the modern age.
Revolvers are relatively simple firearms that store several rounds (usually six) in a revolving cylinder. As the trigger is pulled, the cylinder revolves to bring the next bullet in line with the barrel.
Machine pistols are automatic weapons small enough to be fired with one hand. Some are autoloader pistols modified to fire a burst of bullets in a single pull of the trigger, while others are modified submachine guns, cut down in size and weight to allow one-handed use.
Ranged weapons that use box magazines come with one full magazine.

Beretta 92F: The standard service pistol of the United States military and many American law enforcement agencies.
Beretta 93R: This close relative of the Beretta 92F looks like a large autoloader but can fire on automatic. It sports a fold-down grip in front of the trigger guard, an extendable steel shoulder stock that is attached to the butt of the pistol, and an extended magazine.
This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he or she makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.
Colt Double Eagle: Based on the M1911 mechanism, this pistol is an updated civilian version that fires a 10mm round.
Colt M1911: This .45 semiautomatic pistol was used by the United States military for decades until it was recently replaced by the Beretta 92F. Manufactured at three locations in the United States alone, the M1911 can be found all over the world, and is still in use in several other military forces.
Colt Python: The Python has a well-deserved reputation for accuracy. Due to its high quality of manufacture, the Colt Python is always considered a mastercraft weapon. As such, it grants a +1 bonus on attack rolls.
Derringer: This pistol breaks open at the breech like a double-barreled shotgun. The two-shot weapon has one barrel atop the other and is barely 5 inches long, making it easy to conceal.
Desert Eagle: Manufactured by Israeli Military Industries, the Desert Eagle is the king of large-frame, heavy-caliber autoloaders. The version on Table: Ranged Weapons fires the massive .50 Action Express round. The Desert Eagle also comes in .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum models.
Glock 17: The Glock is typical of 9mm self-loading pistols carried by many police officers and military personnel.
Due to its high quality of manufacture, the Glock 17 is always considered a mastercraft weapon. As such, it grants a +1 bonus on attack rolls.
Glock 20: This slightly larger version of the Glock 17 is chambered for the slightly more powerful 10mm round.
Due to its high quality of manufacture, the Glock 20 is always considered a mastercraft weapon. As such, it grants a +1 bonus on attack rolls.
MAC Ingram M10: No longer in production, about 10,000 of these small submachine guns were made and supplied to United States police forces, the U.S. Army, Cuba, and Peru. Light pressure on the trigger produces single shots, while increased pressure brings automatic fire.
The M10 accepts a suppressor without modification.
Pathfinder: The Pathfinder is a high-quality weapon used as a concealed backup weapon by police officers or for personal defense. The Pathfinder is typical of a number of short-barreled (3 inches) small-caliber revolvers.
Ruger Service-Six: This revolver, designed specifically for police use, fires the .38 Special round. It was very popular with United States police forces prior to the increasing use of autoloaders in recent decades, and is still in service with many police forces today.
S&W M29: The Smith & Wesson Model 29 .44 Magnum revolver fires one of the most powerful pistol cartridges in the world. The M29 is known for its deafening sound, bright muzzle flash, and powerful recoil.
SITES M9 Resolver: The compact SITES weapon is very narrow, making it easy to conceal.
Skorpion: The CZ61 Skorpion is a Czech machine pistol seen increasingly in the West since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Originally intended for military vehicle crews who don’t have space for an unwieldy longarm, it was widely distributed to Communist countries and in central Africa, and can now be found anywhere in the world.
TEC-9: The Intratec TEC-9 is an inexpensive machine pistol popular with criminals because it can be modified (Repair check DC 15) to fire on automatic. The pistol only works on semiautomatic fire or, if modified, only on automatic. Once modified to fire on automatic, the TEC-9 cannot be changed back to semiautomatic.
Walther PPK: The PPK is a small, simple, and reliable autoloader with a design that dates back to the 1930s. It remains in widespread service among European police, military, and government agencies.
Longarms

Longarms are personal firearms that require two hands to be fired without penalty. This group includes hunting and sniping rifles, assault rifles, shotguns, and most submachine guns.
The basic longarm is the rifle, a group that includes both hunting rifles and sniper rifles. Most rifles are autoloaders, and they function internally in a manner very similar to autoloader pistols. Some models are operated manually, however, with the user having to work a bolt or lever between each shot. Assault rifles are rifles designed for military use and feature automatic as well as semiautomatic fire.
Shotguns are large-bore weapons that primarily fire shells full of small projectiles. They tend to be powerful, but only at short range. Reduce shotgun damage by 1 point for every range increment of the attack.
Submachine guns are relatively compact longarms that generally fire pistol ammunition. They can fire on automatic.
All longarms are covered by the Personal Firearms Proficiency feat.
Longarms are not well suited to close combat. A character takes a –4 penalty on the attack roll when firing at an adjacent target.

AKM/AK-47: This assault rifle of the old Soviet Union is one of the most popular firearms in the world, having found common use in scores of bush wars and insurrections—on all sides of such conflicts. The AKM is a slightly more modern version of the AK-47, but functions essentially the same.
Barrett Light Fifty: The heavy but rugged Light Fifty is an incredibly powerful weapon for its size. Although it’s a sniper rifle, it fires a .50-caliber machine gun bullet, a round much more powerful than any other rifle ammunition.
Benelli 121 M1: The Benelli 121 M1 semiautomatic shotgun is reliable, simple, and sturdy, with one of the fastest shotgun actions in the world. Many military and law enforcement agencies use this or similar weapons.
Beretta M3P: Designed for police and security work, the M3P can fire either single shots or on semiautomatic. The M3P comes equipped with a tubular steel stock that folds over the top of the weapon to form a carrying handle, and its ammunition feeds from a box magazine—an uncommon feature in a shotgun.
Browning BPS: This heavy longarm fires the largest shotgun round available, the 10-gauge shell.
HK G3: The G3 fires the powerful 7.62mm cartridge, a round used in many light machine guns but increasingly uncommon in assault rifles. At one time, over sixty of the world’s armies used this rifle.
HK MP5: The Heckler & Koch MP5 family of weapons is among the most recognizable in the world. Many different designs exist; dexscribed here is the most basic model.
Due to its high quality of manufacture, the MP5 is always considered a mastercraft weapon. As such, it grants a +1 bonus on attack rolls.
This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he or she makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.
HK MP5K: A radically shortened version of the MP5, this weapon is optimized to be concealable. The steps taken to reduce the weapon’s size and weight negate the benefits of the parent weapon’s extraordinary quality, and as a result the MP5K is not a mastercraft weapon.
Although it comes with a 15-round magazine, the MP5K can also accept the same 30-round magazine as the MP5 (use of the larger magazine increases the weapon’s size to Large, though).
This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he or she makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.
HK PSG1: This high-precision sniper rifle, based on the design of the HK G3, has a fully adjustable trigger and stock for individual users. The PSG1 comes with a standard scope.
Due to its high quality of manufacture, the PSG1 is always considered a mastercraft weapon. As such, it grants a +1 bonus on attack rolls.
M16A2: Typical of the assault rifles used by militaries around the world, the Colt M16A2 is the current service rifle of the United States military, and is common with other armies and in the civilian world.
This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he or she makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.
M4 Carbine: This is a cut-down version of the Colt M16A2, shortened by about a third by means of a telescoping stock and a shorter barrel.
M-60: Introduced in the Vietnam War era, this medium machine gun is still in widespread use with the U.S. military and that of several other armies.
Mossberg: The Mossberg Model 500 ATP6C is a pump-action shotgun designed for military and police work.
Remington 700: A bolt-action rifle with a reputation for accuracy, the Remington 700 has been popular with hunters and target shooters since its introduction in the 1940s.
Sawed-Off Shotgun: This is a 12-gauge, double-barreled shotgun with the stock and barrels sawed short. All that’s left of the stock is a pistol grip, and the barrels are roughly 12 inches long.
Sawed-off shotguns are generally illegal; most are homemade by cutting down a standard shotgun.
If this weapon if fully-loaded, a character can fire both barrels at once. The character receives a –2 penalty on the attack but deals +1 die of damage with a successful hit. Attacking this way uses both shotgun shells.
Steyr AUG: An unusual and exotic-looking weapon, the bullpup AUG is the standard rifle of the Austrian and Australian armies. Its completely ambidextrous components make it equally convenient for left- and right-handed users, and it features a built-in optical sight.
This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he or she makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.
Uzi: Designed in the 1950s for the Israeli army, the Uzi has become the most popular submachine gun in the world. It features a collapsible stock, making it extremely compact.
Winchester 94: The Winchester Model 94 Big Bore is a lever-action rifle typical of big-bore hunting rifles found around the world.
Heavy Weapons

The weapons covered in this section fall under the Exotic Firearms Proficiency feat. Someone who wields a heavy weapon without the appropriate proficiency takes a –4 penalty on all attack rolls with the weapon.
M2HB: This heavy-duty .50-caliber machine gun has been in service since World War II, and remains a very common vehicle-mounted military weapon around the world. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (heavy machine guns) feat applies to this weapon.
M72A3 LAW: The LAW (light antitank weapon) is a disposable, one-shot rocket launcher. It comes as a short, telescoped fiberglass and aluminum tube. Before using the weapon, the firer must first arm and extend the tube, which is a move action.
When the LAW hits its target, it explodes like a grenade or other explosive, dealing its 10d6 points of damage to all creatures within a 10-foot radius (Reflex save DC 18 for half damage). Because its explosive features a shaped charge designed to penetrate the armor of military vehicles, the LAW ignores up to 10 points of hardness if it strikes a vehicle, building, or object. However, this only applies to the target struck, not to other objects within the burst radius.
The M72 has a minimum range of 30 feet. If fired against a target closer than 30 feet away, it does not arm and will not explode.
The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (rocket launchers) feat applies to this weapon.
M79: This simple weapon is a single-shot grenade launcher. It fires 40mm grenades (see under Grenades and Explosives, below). These grenades look like huge bullets an inch and a half across; they can’t be used as hand grenades, and the M79 can’t shoot hand grenades.
Attacking with an M79 is identical to throwing an explosive: you make a ranged attack against a specific 5-foot square (instead of targeting a person or creature). The differences between using the M79 and throwing an explosive lie in the range of the weapon (which far exceeds the distance a hand grenade can be thrown) and the fact that the M79 requires a weapon proficiency to operate without penalty.
The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (grenade launchers) feat applies to this weapon.
Other Ranged Weapons

Ranged weapons that are not firearms include such diverse objects as crossbows, tasers, and pepper spray. The feat that provides proficiency with these weapons varies from weapon to weapon, as indicated on Table: Ranged Weapons.
Compound Bow: Bow hunting remains a popular sport in North America. A character’s Strength modifier applies to damage rolls made when using this weapon.
Crossbow: A crossbow requires two hands to use. Pulling a lever draws the bow. Loading a crossbow is a move action that provokes attacks of opportunity.
Flamethrower: A flamethrower consists of a pressurized backpack containing fuel, connected to a tube with a nozzle. It shoots a 5-foot-wide, 30-foot-long line of flame that deals 3d6 points of fire damage to all creatures and objects in its path. No attack roll is necessary, and thus no feat is needed to operate the weapon effectively. Any creature caught in the line of flame can make a Reflex save (DC 15) to take half damage. Creatures with cover get a bonus on their Reflex save.
A flamethrower’s backpack has hardness 5 and 5 hit points. When worn, the backpack has a Defense equal to 9 + the wearer’s Dexterity modifier + the wearer’s class bonus. A backpack reduced to 0 hit points ruptures and explodes, dealing 6d6 points of fire damage to the wearer (no save allowed) and 3d6 points of splash damage to creatures and objects in adjacent 5-foot squares (Reflex save, DC 15, for half damage).
Any creature or flammable object that takes damage from a flamethrower catches on fire, taking 1d6 points of fire damage each subsequent round until the flames are extinguished. A fire engulfing a single creature or object can be doused or smothered as a full-round action. Discharging a fire extinguisher is a move action and instantly smothers flames in a 10-foot-by-10-foot area.
A flamethrower can shoot 10 times before the fuel supply is depleted. Refilling or replacing a fuel pack has a purchase DC of 13.
Javelin: This light, flexible spear built for throwing can be used in melee, but since it’s not designed for it, characters using it in this manner are always considered nonproficient and take a –4 penalty on their melee attack rolls.
Pepper Spray: A chemical irritant that can temporarily blind a target, pepper spray comes in a single-shot container. To use it, make a ranged touch attack against the target. The target must make a Fortitude saving throw (DC 15) or be blinded for 1d4 rounds. Pepper spray is limited to 5 range increments.
Shuriken: A shuriken is a thrown, star-shaped projectile with four to eight razor-sharp points. A character may draw a shuriken as a free action.
Taser: A taser uses springs or compressed air to fire a pair of darts at a target. On impact, the darts release a powerful electrical current. On a successful hit, the darts deal 1d4 points of electricity damage and the target must make a Fortitude saving throw (DC 15) or be paralyzed for 1d6 rounds. Reloading a taser is a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity.
Whip: Whips deal a small amount of lethal damage. Although a character doesn’t “fire” the weapon, treat a whip as a ranged weapon with a maximum range of 15 feet and no range penalties.
Because a whip can wrap around an enemy’s leg or other limb, a character can make a trip attack with it by succeeding at a ranged touch attack. The character does not provoke an attack of opportunity when using a whip in this way. If the character is tripped during his or her own trip attempt, the character can drop the whip to avoid being tripped.
When using a whip, a character gets a +2 bonus on your opposed attack roll when attempting to disarm an opponent (including the roll to keep from being disarmed if the character fails to disarm the opponent).
Ammunition

Ammunition for firearms and other ranged weapons is covered on Table: Ammunition.

Table: Ammunition

Ammunition Type (Quantity)
Purchase DC
5.56mm (20) 4
7.62mm (20) 4
7.62mmR (20) 4
.444 caliber (20) 6
.50 caliber (20) 6
9mm (50) 5
10mm (50) 5
.22 caliber (50) 4
.32 caliber (50) 5
.38 special (50) 5
.357 caliber (50) 5
.44 caliber (50) 5
.45 caliber (50) 5
.50AE caliber (50) 6
10-gauge buckshot (10) 5
12-gauge buckshot (10) 4
Arrow (12) 8
Crossbow bolt (12) 7

5.56mm, 7.62mm, 7.62mmR, .444, .50
: These calibers of ammunition are generally used in rifles, assault rifles, or machine guns, and are sold in boxes of 20 bullets each. The 7.62mmR is used in the AKM and other ex-Soviet weapon types, and is not compatible with the larger 7.62mm cartridge. The .50 caliber is a huge cartridge generally fired from heavy machine guns, but also adapted to a few models of powerful sniper rifles.
9mm, 10mm, .22, .32, .38 S, .357, .44, .45, .50AE: These calibers are generally used in pistols or submachine guns, and are sold in boxes of 50 bullets each. The .50AE pistol round is not compatible with the much larger .50 rifle-caliber cartridge (see above).
10-gauge Buckshot, 12-gauge Buckshot: Shotgun cartridges, also known as buckshot, are sold in boxes of ten.
Arrow: Arrows come in quivers of 12 and are used with the compound bow and other types of archery weapons. These missile weapons consist of a slender shaft and a pointed head.
Crossbow Bolt: A shaft or missile designed to be shot from a crossbow, bolts come in quivers of 12.
Explosives and Splash Weapons Table

Explosives and splash weapons are described by a number of statistics, as shown on Table: Explosives and Splash Weapons.
Damage/Direct Hit Damage: : The primary damage dealt by the weapon. For explosives, the Damage column shows the damage dealt to all creatures within the explosive’s burst radius. For splash weapons, the Direct Hit Damage column is used for a target directly struck by the weapon.
Burst Radius/Splash Damage: : For explosives, the burst radius is the area affected by the explosive. All creatures or objects within the burst radius take damage from the explosive.
For splash weapons, all creatures within 5 feet of the weapon’s impact point take splash damage equal to the amount shown in this column.
Damage Type: : Damage from explosives and splash weapons is classified according to type: energy (of a specific type) or slashing. Some creatures or characters may be resistant or immune to some forms of damage.
Critical: : The threat range for a critical hit. If the threat is confirmed, a weapon deals double damage on a critical hit (roll damage twice, as if hitting the target two times).
Reflex DC: : Any creature caught within the burst radius of an explosive may make a Reflex save against the DC given in this column for half damage.
Range Increment: : If the weapon can be thrown, its range increment is shown in this column. Explosives with no range increment must be set in place before being detonated. (See the Demolitions skill)
Size: : Size categories for weapons and other objects are defined differently from the size categories for creatures. The relationship between a weapon’s size and that of its wielder defines whether it can be used one-handed, if it requires two hands, and if it’s a light weapon.
A Medium-size or smaller weapon can be used one-handed or two-handed.
A Small or smaller weapon is considered a light weapon. It can be used one-handed and, as a light weapon, is easier to use in a character’s off hand.
Weight: : This column gives the weapon’s weight.
Purchase DC: : This is the purchase DC for a Wealth check to acquire the weapon. This number reflects the base price and doesn’t include any modifier for purchasing the weapon on the black market.
Restriction: : The restriction rating for the weapon, if any, and the appropriate black market purchase DC modifier. Remember to apply this modifier to the purchase DC when making a Wealth check to acquire the weapon on the black market.

Table: Explosives and Splash Weapons
Grenades and Explosives
Weapon
Damage Critical Damage Type Burst Radius Reflex DC Range Increment Size Weight Purchase DC Restriction
40mm fragmentation grenade 3d6 - Slashing 10 ft. 15 - Tiny 1 lb. 16 Mil (+3)
C4/Semtex 4d6 - Concussion 10 ft. 18 - Small 1 lb. 12 Mil (+3)
Det cord 2d6 - Fire See text 12 - Med 2 lb. 8 Res (+2)
Dynamite 2d6 - Concussion 5 ft. 15 10 ft. Tiny 1 lb. 12 Lic (+1)
Fragmentation grenade 4d6 - Slashing 20 ft. 15 10 ft. Tiny 1 lb. 15 Mil (+3)
Smoke grenade - - - See text - 10 ft. Small 2 lb. 10 -
Tear gas grenade See text - - See text - 10 ft. Small 2 lb. 12 Res (+2)
Thermite grenade 6d6 - Fire 5 ft. 12 10 ft. Small 2 lb. 17 Mil (+3)
White phosphorus grenade 2d6 - Fire 20 ft. 12 10 ft. Small 2 lb. 15 Mil (+3)
Splash Weapons
Weapon
Direct Hit Damage Splash Damage Critical2 Damage Type Reflex DC Range Increment Size Weight Purchase DC Restriction
Acid, mild 1d6 1 20 Acid - 10 ft. Tiny 1 lb. 6 -
Molotov Cocktail1 1d6 1 20 Fire - 10 ft. Small 1 lb. 3 -
1 This weapon cannot be purchased as an item; the purchase DC given is for the weapon’s components.
2 Threat range applies to direct hits only; splash damage does not threaten a critical hit.
Grenades and Explosives

Many explosives require detonators, which are described in Weapon Accessories.
40mm Fragmentation Grenade: This small explosive device must be fired from a 40mm grenade launcher, such as the M79. It sprays shrapnel in all directions when it explodes.
The 40mm fragmentation grenade has a minimum range of 40 feet. If fired against a target closer than 40 feet away, it does not arm and will not explode.
The purchase DC given is for a box of 6 grenades.
C4/Semtex: So-called “plastic” explosives resemble slabs of wax. Hard and translucent when cold, these explosives warm up when kneaded, and then can be coaxed to take various shapes. The information on the table represents a 1-pound block. Additional blocks can be wired together, increasing the damage and burst radius; each additional block increases the damage by +2d6 and the burst radius by 2 feet, and requires a Demolitions check (DC 15) to link them.
Although the damage statistics on the table represent a 1-pound block, C4 is sold in 4-block packages. The purchase DC given represents a package of 4 blocks.
C4/Semtex requires a detonator to set off. It is considered to be a moderate explosive for the purpose of using a Craft (chemical) check to manufacture it.
Det Cord: Det cord is an explosive in a ropelike form. Technically, det cord doesn’t explode—but it burns so fast (4,000 yards per second) that it might as well be exploding. Normally used to string multiple explosive charges together for simultaneous detonation (allowing a single detonator to set them all off), det cord can also be looped around a tree or post or other object to cut it neatly in half.
The information on the table represents a 50-foot length. A length of det cord can be spread out to pass through up to ten 5-foot squares. When this is the case, it deals the indicated damage to all creatures in each 5-foot square through which it passes.
It can also be doubled up; for each additional 5 feet of cord within a single 5-foot square, increase the damage by +1d6 to a maximum increase of +4d6.
Det cord requires a detonator to set it off. It is considered to be a simple explosive for the purpose of using a Craft (chemical) check to manufacture it.
Dynamite: Perhaps one of the most common and straightforward explosives, dynamite is very stable under normal conditions. A stick of dynamite requires a fuse or detonator to set it off. Additional sticks can be set off at the same time if they are within the burst radius of the first stick, increasing the damage and burst radius of the explosion. Each additional stick increases the damage by +1d6 (maximum 10d6) and the burst radius by 5 feet (maximum 20 feet).
It’s possible to wire together several sticks of dynamite for even greater explosive effect. Doing so requires a Demolitions check (DC 10 + 1 per stick). If the character succeeds on the check, the damage or the burst radius of the explosion increases by 50% (the character’s choice).
Dynamite is sold in boxes of 12 sticks. It is considered to be a simple explosive for the purpose of using a Craft (chemical) check to manufacture it.
To set off dynamite using a fuse, the fuse must first be lit, requiring a move action (and a lighter or other source of flame). The amount of time until the dynamite explodes depends on the length of the fuse—a fuse can be cut short enough for the dynamite to detonate in the same round (allowing it to be used much like a grenade), or long enough to take several minutes to detonate. Cutting the fuse to the appropriate length requires a move action.
Fragmentation Grenade: The most common military grenade, this is a small explosive device that sprays shrapnel in all directions when it explodes.
The purchase DC given is for a box of 6 grenades.
Smoke Grenade: Military and police forces use these weapons to create temporary concealment. On the round when it is thrown, a smoke grenade fills the four squares around it with smoke. On the following round, it fills all squares within 10 feet, and on the third round it fills all squares within 15 feet. The smoke obscures all sight, including the darkvision ability granted by night vision goggles. Any creature within the area has total concealment (attacks suffer a 50% miss chance, and the attacker can’t use sight to locate the target). It disperses after 10 rounds, though a moderate wind (11+ mph) disperses the smoke in 4 rounds and a strong wind (21+ mph) disperses it in 1 round.
Smoke grenades are available in several colors, including white, red, yellow, green, and purple. As such, they can be used as signal devices.
The purchase DC given is for a box of 6 grenades.
Tear Gas Grenade: Military and police forces use these weapons to disperse crowds and smoke out hostage takers. On the round that it is thrown, a tear gas grenade fills a 5-foot radius with a cloud of irritant that causes eyes to fill with tears. On the following round, it fills a 10-foot radius, and on the third round it fills a 15-foot radius. It disperses after 10 rounds, though a moderate wind (11+ mph) disperses the smoke in 4 rounds and a strong wind (21+ mph) disperses it in 1 round.
A character caught in a cloud of tear gas must make a Fortitude save (DC 15) or be nauseated. This effect lasts as long as the character is in the cloud and for 1d6 rounds after he or she leaves the cloud. Those who succeed at their saves but remain in the cloud must continue to save each round. A gas mask renders the target immune to the effects. A wet cloth held over the eyes, nose, and mouth provides a +2 bonus on the Fortitude save.
The purchase DC given is for a box of 6 grenades.
Thermite Grenade: Thermite does not technically explode. Instead, it creates intense heat meant to burn or melt through an object upon which the grenade is set. Military forces use thermite grenades to quickly destroy key pieces of equipment.
The purchase DC given is for a box of 6 grenades.
White Phosphorus Grenade: White phosphorus grenades use an explosive charge to distribute burning phosphorus across the burst radius. Any target that takes damage from a White Phosphorus grenade is dealt an additional 1d6 points of fire damage in the following round and risks catching on fire.
In addition, a WP grenade creates a cloud of smoke. Treat a white phosphorus grenade as a smoke grenade (see above), except that it only fills squares within 5 feet of the explosion point.
The purchase DC given is for a box of 6 grenades.
Splash Weapons

Many splash weapons, such as Molotov cocktails, are essentially homemade devices (improvised explosives). The purchase DC given in Table: Explosives and Splash Weapons reflects the typical cost of the necessary components. See the Craft (chemical) skill for details on making improvised explosives.
Acid, Mild: A character can throw a flask of acid as a grenadelike weapon. A flask is made of ceramic, metal, or glass (depending on the substance it has to hold), with a tight stopper, and holds about 1 pint of liquid. This entry represents any mild caustic substance. Acid may be purchased in many places, including hardware stores.
Molotov Cocktail: A Molotov cocktail is a flask containing a flammable liquid, plugged with a rag. A Molotov cocktail is easily made by hand (Craft [chemical] check DC 10 or Intelligence check DC 15). The purchase DC given is for the components. To use it, the rag must first be lit, requiring a move action (and a lighter or other source of flame). The cocktail detonates in 2 rounds or on impact with a solid object, whichever comes first. A target that takes a direct hit is dealt an additional 1d6 points of fire damage in the following round and risks catching on fire.
Melee Weapons

Melee weapons are used in close combat, and they are generally among the simplest types of weapons. The feat that provides proficiency with these weapons varies from weapon to weapon; some are considered simple weapons (covered by the Simple Weapons Proficiency feat); others are archaic (Archaic Weapons Proficiency) or exotic (Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency).
A character’s Strength modifier is always added to a melee weapon’s attack roll and damage roll.
Melee Weapons Table

Melee weapons are described by a number of statistics, as shown on Table: Melee Weapons.
Damage: The damage the weapon deals on a successful hit.
Critical: The threat range for a critical hit. If the threat is confirmed, a weapon deals double damage on a critical hit (roll damage twice, as if hitting the target two times).
Damage Type: Melee weapon damage is classified according to type: bludgeoning (weapons with a blunt striking surface), energy (of a specific type), piercing (weapons with a sharp point), and slashing (weapons with an edged blade). Some creatures or characters may be resistant or immune to some forms of damage.
Range Increment: Melee weapons that are designed to be thrown can be used to make ranged attacks. As such, they have a range increment just as other ranged weapons do—but the maximum range for a thrown weapon is five range increments instead of ten.
Any attack at less than the given range increment is not penalized for range. However, each full range increment causes a cumulative –2 penalty on the attack roll.
Size: Size categories for weapons and other objects are defined differently from the size categories for creatures. The relationship between a weapon’s size and that of its wielder defines whether it can be used one-handed, if it requires two hands, and if it’s a light weapon.
A Medium-size or smaller weapon can be used one-handed or two-handed. A Large weapon requires two hands.
A Small or smaller weapon is considered a light weapon. It can be used one-handed and, as a light weapon, is easier to use in a character’s off hand.
Weight: This column gives the weapon’s weight.
Purchase DC: This is the purchase DC for a Wealth check to acquire the weapon.
Restriction: None of the following melee weapons have restrictions on their purchase.

Table: Melee Weapons
Weapon
Damage Critical Damage Type Range Increment Size Weight Purchase DC Restriction
Simple Weapons (require the Simple Weapons Proficiency feat)
Brass knuckles 1 20 Bludgeoning - Tiny 1 lb. 5 -
Cleaver 1d6 19-20 Slashing - Small 2 lb. 5 -
Club 1d6 20 Bludgeoning 10 ft. Med 3 lb. 4 -
Knife 1d4 19-20 Piercing 10 ft. Tiny 1 lb. 7 -
Metal baton 1d6 19-20 Bludgeoning - Med 2 lb. 8 -
Pistol whip 1d4 20 Bludgeoning - Small - - -
Rifle butt 1d6 20 Bludgeoning - Large - - -
Sap 1d61 20 Bludgeoning - Small 3 lb. 2 -
Stun gun1 1d3 20 Electricity - Tiny 1 lb. 5 -
Tonfa1 1d4 20 Bludgeoning - Med 2 lb. 6 -
Archaic Weapons (require the Archaic Weapons Proficiency feat)
Bayonet (fixed)1 1d4/1d6 20 Piercing - Large 1 lb. 7 -
Hatchet 1d6 20 Slashing 10 ft. Small 4 lb. 4 -
Longsword 1d8 19-20 Slashing - Med 4 lb. 11 -
Machete 1d6 19-20 Slashing - Small 2 lb. 5 -
Rapier 1d6 18-20 Piercing - Med 3 lb. 10 -
Spear 1d8 20 Piercing - Large 9 lb. 6 -
Straight razor 1d4 19-20 Slashing - Tiny 0.5 lb. 4 -
Sword cane1 1d6 18-20 Piercing - Med 3 lb. 9 -
Exotic Melee Weapons (each requires a specific Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency feat)
Chain1 1d6/1d6 20 Bludgeoning - Large 5 lb. 5 -
Chain saw 3d6 20 Slashing - Large 10 lb. 9 -
Kama 1d6 20 Slashing - Small 2 lb. 5 -
Katana 2d6 19-20 Slashing - Large 6 lb. 12 -
Kukri 1d4 18-20 Slashing - Small 1 lb. 5 -
Nunchaku1 1d6 20 Bludgeoning - Small 2 lb. 3 -
Three-section staff1 1d10/1d10 20 Bludgeoning - Large 3 lb. 4 -
1 See the description of this weapon for special rules.
Simple Melee Weapons

Generally inexpensive and light in weight, simple weapons get the job done nevertheless.
Brass Knuckles: These pieces of molded metal fit over the outside of a character’s fingers and allow him or her to deal lethal damage with an unarmed strike instead of nonlethal damage.
A strike with brass knuckles is otherwise considered an unarmed attack.
When used by a character with the Brawl feat, brass knuckles increase the base damage dealt by an unarmed strike by +1 and turn the damage into lethal damage.
The cost and weight given are for a single item.
Cleaver: Heavy kitchen knives can be snatched up for use as weapons in homes and restaurants. These weapons are essentially similar to the twin butterfly swords used in some kung fu styles.
Club: Almost anything can be used as a club. This entry represents the wooden nightsticks sometimes carried by police forces.
Knife: This category of weapon includes hunting knives, butterfly or “balisong” knives, switchblades, and bayonets (when not attached to rifles). A character can select the Weapon Finesse feat to apply his or her Dexterity modifier instead of Strength modifier to attack rolls with a knife.
Metal Baton: This weapon can be collapsed to reduce its size and increase its concealability. A collapsed baton is Small and can’t be used as a weapon. Extending or collapsing the baton is a free action.
Pistol Whip: Using a pistol as a melee weapon can deal greater damage than attacking unarmed. No weight or purchase DC is given for this weapon, since both vary depending on the pistol used.
Rifle Butt: The butt of a rifle can be used as an impromptu club.
Sap: This weapon, essentially a smaller version of a club, deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage.
Stun Gun: Although the name suggests a ranged weapon, a stun gun requires physical contact to affect its target. (The taser is a ranged weapon with a similar effect.) On a successful hit, the stun gun deals 1d3 points of electricity damage,(do not add the character’s Str bonus) and the target must make a Fortitude saving throw (DC 15) or be paralyzed for 1d6 rounds.
Tonfa: This is the melee weapon carried by most police forces, used to subdue and restrain criminals. A character can deal nonlethal damage with a tonfa without taking the usual –4 penalty.
Archaic Melee Weapons

Most of these weapons deal damage by means of a blade or a sharp point. Some of them are moderately expensive, reflecting their archaic nature in modern-day society.
Bayonet (Fixed): The statistics given describe a bayonet fixed at the end of a longarm with an appropriate mount. With the bayonet fixed, the longarm becomes a double weapon—clublike at one end and spearlike at the other. A character can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if the character does so, he or she incurs all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, as if using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon.
Hatchet: This light axe is a chopping tool that deals slashing damage when employed as a weapon.
Longsword: This classic, straight blade is the weapon of knighthood and valor.
Machete: This long-bladed tool looks much like a short, lightweight sword.
Rapier: The rapier is a lightweight sword with a thin blade. A character can select the Weapon Finesse feat to apply his or her Dexterity modifier instead of Strength modifier to attack rolls with a rapier.
Spear: This primitive device is a reach weapon. A character can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but can’t use it against an adjacent foe.
Straight Razor: Favored by old-school organized crime “mechanics,” this item can still be found in some barbershops and shaving kits.
Sword Cane: This is a lightweight, concealed sword that hides its blade in the shaft of a walking stick or umbrella. Because of this special construction, a sword cane is always considered to be concealed; it is noticed only with a Spot check (DC 18). (The walking stick or umbrella is not concealed, only the blade within.)
Exotic Melee Weapons

Most exotic weapons are either atypical in form or improved variations of other melee weapons. Because each exotic weapon is unique in how it is manipulated and employed, a separate Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency feat is required for each one in order to avoid the –4 nonproficient penalty.
Chain: Also called the manriki-gusari, this is a simple chain with weighted ends. It can be whirled quickly, striking with hard blows from the weights. One end can also be swung to entangle an opponent.
The chain can be used either as a double weapon or as a reach weapon. A character can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, incurring all the normal attack penalties as if using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. In this case, the character can only strike at an adjacent opponent.
If a character uses the chain as a reach weapon, he or she can strike opponents up to 10 feet away. In addition, unlike other weapons with reach, the character can use it against an adjacent foe. In this case, the character can only use one end of the chain effectively; he or she can’t use it as a double weapon.
Because a chain can wrap around an enemy’s leg or other limb, a character can make a trip attack with it by succeeding at a melee touch attack. If the character is tripped during his or her own trip attempt, the character can drop the chain to avoid being tripped.
When using a chain, the character gets a +2 equipment bonus on his or her opposed attack roll when attempting to disarm an opponent (including the roll to avoid being disarmed if the character fails to disarm the opponent).
A character can select the Weapon Finesse feat to apply his or her Dexterity modifier instead of Strength modifier to attack rolls with a chain.
Chain Saw: Military and police units use powered saws to cut through fences and open doors rapidly. They are sometimes pressed into service as weapons, often by people who watch too many movies.
Kama: A kama is a wooden shaft with a scythe blade extending at a right angle out from the shaft. Kama are traditional weapons in various styles of karate.
Katana: The katana is the traditional Japanese samurai sword. When used with the Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency feat, it can be used with one hand. For a wielder without the feat, the katana must be used with two hands, and the standard –4 nonproficiency penalty applies.
Kukri: This heavy, curved dagger has its sharp edge on the inside of the curve.
Nunchaku: A popular martial arts weapon, the nunchaku is made of two wooden shafts connected by a short length of rope or chain.
Three-Section Staff: Originally a farm implement for threshing grain, this weapon is composed of three sections of wood of equal lengths, joined at the ends by chain, leather, or rope. The three-section staff requires two hands to use.
The three-section staff is a double weapon. A character can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if he or she does, the character incurs all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, as if using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon.
Improvised Weapons

Any portable object can be used as a weapon in a pinch. In most cases, an object can be wielded either as a melee weapon or a ranged weapon.
A character takes a –4 penalty on his or her attack roll when wielding or throwing an improvised weapon. An improvised weapon is not considered simple, archaic, or exotic, so weapon proficiency feats cannot offset the –4 penalty.

Table: Improvised Weapons
Object Size
Examples Damage
Diminutive Ashtray, CD disk case, crystal paperweight 1
Tiny Fist-sized rock, mug, screwdriver, softball, flashlight, wrench 1d2
Small Bottle, drill, fire extinguisher, flower pot, helmet, metal hubcap, vase 1d3
Medium size Bar stool, brick, briefcase, bowling ball, garbage can lid, hockey stick, nail gun 1d4
Large Empty garbage can, guitar, computer monitor, office chair, tire iron 1d6
Huge 10-foot ladder, mailbox, oil barrel, park bench, sawhorse 1d8
Gargantuan Desk, dumpster, file cabinet, large sofa, soda machine 2d6
Colossal Junked vehicle, stoplight, telephone pole 2d8
A character can effectively wield or throw an object of his or her size category or smaller using one hand. A character can effectively wield or throw an object one size category larger than him or herself using two hands. An improvised thrown weapon has a range increment of 10 feet. Increase the range increment for creatures of Large size or larger as follows: Large 15 feet, Huge 30 feet, Gargantuan 60 feet, Colossal 120 feet.

Damage: Improvised weapons deal lethal damage based on their size, although the GM may adjust the damage of an object that is especially light or heavy for its size. The wielder’s Strength modifier applies only to damage from Tiny or larger improvised weapons; do not apply the wielder’s Strength modifier to damage from Diminutive objects. Table: Improvised Weapon Damage by Size gives the damage for improvised weapons of varying size. Improvised weapons threaten a critical hit on a natural roll of 20. Improvised weapons of Fine size deal no damage.

Unlike real weapons, improvised weapons are not designed to absorb damage. They tend to shatter, bend, crumple, or fall apart after a few blows. An improvised weapon has a 50% chance of breaking each time it deals damage or, in the case of thrown objects, strikes a surface (such as a wall) or an object larger than itself.