5E Looking at getting my kids started on DnD. Need advice
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  1. #1
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    Looking at getting my kids started on DnD. Need advice

    I have three boys: 5, 8, 10. All are very advanced readers. My five yo can read at the 3rd grade level but lacks comprehension. They all have an interest in fantasy stuff like LOtR movies, two oldest have read Harry Potter, etc. We play Zombicide Black Plague so I think miniatures will help them visualize things. I was contemplating running low level adventures from B1-9 or something such as that. Just curious what others may have done or what advice they have to offer.
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  2. #2
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    I think you've started off right. Miniatures is what really got my two oldest playing. The next thing that happened is they found my monster manual and that book really interested them.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by broghammerj View Post
    I have three boys: 5, 8, 10. All are very advanced readers. My five yo can read at the 3rd grade level but lacks comprehension. They all have an interest in fantasy stuff like LOtR movies, two oldest have read Harry Potter, etc. We play Zombicide Black Plague so I think miniatures will help them visualize things. I was contemplating running low level adventures from B1-9 or something such as that. Just curious what others may have done or what advice they have to offer.
    My son is 6. I introduced him to DnD via 5e and he loves it. Keeping the adventures (at first) and character stuff simple seems to work. He doesn't care about politics or intrigue or any of that. He simply wants to gear his hero and go out and fight the bad guys.

    I started him with the intro adventure in the old red box set. The one where you go to the ruined house/mansion....carrion crawler under the fallen gates, harpies in the fireplace, etc. His first character is/was a fighter but he's now decided he wants to play a wizard or sorcerer so that's next on the agenda. His wizard plus a few hirelings/NPCs and off he goes.

    Basically keep it simple. As long as they're having fun it's all good. Ignore rules when needed, make it fun. Introduce more rules (like feats or whatever) as they learn and grasp the game.
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  4. #4
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    The 10yo is likely at a good age, but I'd hold off on the other two. Kids at that age don't need rules to tell stories. Especially not a game as rules heavy as D&D. I agree with John Hodgman on the issue:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/10/ma...-dad.html?_r=0

    No Thank You, Evil might be better: http://www.nothankyouevil.com/
    And that would allow the older kid to also make stories for the younger and try running.

    But if your heart is set on D&D, there are some kid friendly variants:
    http://www.susanjmorris.com/dd-for-kids/
    Read my webcomic & blog at:
    http://www.5mwd.com
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  5. #5
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    I wouldn't hold off. I didn't and nearly a decade later my 15 year old son love D&D.

    My advice:
    Don't worry about rules or about the plot too much.
    Don't spend time on rolling up characters completely. Maybe just use distribution and let them pick, ask the younger ones things like: "Do you want to be really strong? or Smart or.."
    When it comes to fights, they should only last 3-4 rounds typically.
    Don't try to play too long, the youngest will only be able to concentrate on playing one game for about 30 minutes.
    The older one(s) can help you level up the other characters and detail the character sheets.
    Keep combat simple, don't worry about all the modifiers etc.

    And most important, your enthusiasm and happiness in their character successes will be what they remember and take away from the game. The youngest won't different well between what happens to his character and what happens to him.

    Have fun
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  6. #6
    I think it's @Bawylie who regularly talks about DMing for kids. He may have some advice for you (which is why I'm tagging him)
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  7. #7
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    This has a list of OSR like games that could fit the bill. I always wanted to try the single page rules searchers of the unknown. It was designed to play the old mods first edition and basic mods but using a simple stat block like the ones for monsters in those mods. And it was one page of rules.

    However swords and wizardry is there, the one meant to be like the original boxes set of rules.

    http://www.howlingtower.com/p/old-sc...urces.html?m=1

  8. #8
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    I'd just grab the starter set, but don't worry too much about the rules if something else seems more fun.
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  9. #9
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    I agree with the starter set, it is 12-15 dollars and uses the basic rules. the module has enough fighting and advancement for the younger ones and the older ones can try to roleplay with some of the townsfolk and such. You can also download the basic rules from the Wizards/Hasbro site for free and make a few simple adventures with the basic monsters yourself. I ran a module for younger ones using the school they attended having the principal be an undercover necromancer and hiding skeletons in the gym and goblins in the locker room. The kids knew the layout and had fun when with the descriptions of the teachers. Maybe do this one during summer vacation though.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by aco175 View Post
    ... I ran a module for younger ones using the school they attended having the principal be an undercover necromancer and hiding skeletons in the gym and goblins in the locker room. The kids knew the layout and had fun when with the descriptions of the teachers. Maybe do this one during summer vacation though.
    I love this idea. Wish I had thought of it. Maybe I could get a map of the high school...

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