Is D&D Entering a New Golden Age?
Page 1 of 12 1234567891011 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 113
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Fairfield, CT
    Posts
    3,151

    Is D&D Entering a New Golden Age?

    Sales of the hobby game market are on the rise, with tabletop role-playing games increasing along with other tabletop games. With a new Wizards of the Coast CEO in place who values Dungeons & Dragons as much as Magic: The Gathering and a movie on the horizon, we're starting to see signs that D&D is doing very well indeed.

    Name:  hasbrodnd.jpg
Views: 10529
Size:  160.8 KB

    The Hobby Market is Doing Well

    ICv2 reported that the hobby market is hitting eye-popping numbers:

    Sales of hobby games in the U.S. and Canada topped $1.4 billion in 2016, reaching $1.44 billion, according to a new estimate compiled by ICv2 and reported in Internal Correspondence #92. Thatís a 21% total growth rate over 2015, with rates of change ranging from 17% for the slowest-growing category to 29% for the fastest-growing. Growth rates were pulled higher by more rapid growth of hobby games in the mass channel, especially in collectible, board, and card & dice games.

    Of those categories, collectible games grew the most, followed by hobby board games and role-playing games. Role-playing games increased the most, by 29%, from $35 million to $45 million. Of the top five RPGs, Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition and Pathfinder retained their first and second position, respectively.

    Ancillary RPG markets are doing well too, like non-collectible miniatures. Non-collectible miniature sales were up from $175 million to $205 million, a 17% increase. Star Wars X-Wing led the charge, followed by Warhammer 40K and D&D's Nolzur's Marvels Minis, high-quality unpainted miniatures produced by Wizkids.

    Unsurprisingly, Hasbro is benefiting from this bump.

    Hasbro's Games Are Doing Well

    Hasbro topped $5 billion in revenue for the first time:

    Net revenues for the full-year 2016 increased 13% to $5.02 billion versus $4.45 billion in 2015. Excluding a negative $61.0 million impact from foreign exchange, 2016 revenues increased 14%. As reported net earnings for the full-year 2016 increased 22% to $551.4 million, or $4.34 per diluted share, compared to $451.8 million, or $3.57 per diluted share in 2015. Adjusted net earnings for the full-year 2016 were $566.1 million, or $4.46 per diluted share. Adjusted 2016 earnings exclude a pre-tax $32.9 million, or $0.12 per diluted share, non-cash fourth quarter goodwill impairment charge related to Backflip Studios. Adjusted full-year 2016 net earnings compares to 2015 adjusted net earnings of $445.0 million, or $3.51 per diluted share, which exclude a pre-tax gain of $9.6 million from the sale of the Company's manufacturing operations in East Longmeadow, MA and Waterford, Ireland.

    Hasbro gaming increased by 23%, reflecting the hobby games market trends:

    Hasbro's total gaming category, including all gaming revenue, most notably MAGIC: THE GATHERING and MONOPOLY, totaled $518.7 million for the fourth quarter 2016, up 11%, and $1,387.1 million, up 9%, for the full year 2016. Hasbro believes its gaming portfolio is a competitive differentiator and views it in its entirety.

    Note that last sentence. Hasbro experienced a decline in Magic: The Gathering sales, and it's likely the leadership team was eager to share other good news in its gaming segment. That would turn out to be beneficial for D&D.

    D&D is Doing Well

    Hasbro CEO Brian Goldner did something unusual -- he mentioned Dungeons & Dragons on an investor call. For years, D&D has been overshadowed by Magic: The Gathering's success when Hasbro reported out Wizards of the Coast's wins to investors. The shout-out alone on the Q1 investor call says something about D&D's success:

    I also am very happy to see very strong growth for brands like DUNGEONS & DRAGONS and Duel Masters. So, the team at (46:34) has gone to a new storytelling modality for MAGIC and, obviously, impacted the quarter. But they've also done some very good work around DUNGEONS and storytelling and in engagement with that audience. So overall, I would expect that our face-to-face gaming business will continue to perform at a high level and the team's done an absolutely stellar job at both the social media oriented games, as well as some more of our classic games.

    Hasbro seems to have a renewed interest in what they term "face-to-face" and "social" games, thanks to its launch of the Hasbro Gaming Crate that focuses on getting people to play together -- a staple of D&D. This is of course Wizards of the Coast's specialty. Investors are noticing.

    Jim Cramer on Mad Money led the segment with an old D&D commercial and mentioned the RPG along with Star Wars as brands that allow Hasbro to "bring imagination to life." Cramer interviewed Goldner, who had some nice things to say about D&D:

    ...and our games business, a raft of great games. Dungeons & Dragons up 50%, Monopoly was of course up, and then of course Magic: The Gathering was up. So great strength in games, 6% growth, 20% growth in the gaming category overall...both Magic: The Gathering and Dungeons & Dragons are on our Twitch programming... Dungeons & Dragons did a very special Twitch channel that they launched with the fans. We've had millions of views on Twitch around Dungeons & Dragons. We're seeing the brand really in resurgence.

    So what does this mean for the future of D&D?

    The Future of D&D

    D&D's demographics have shifted, according to the Daily News, with more female and older players:

    While Wizards of the Coast, which manages the D&D franchise, won't share sales figures, reps tell the Daily News that Millennials (ages 25 to 34) presently make up the largest group of D&D players, followed closely by those aged 35 to 44 and 18 to 24 ó and up to 30% of these gamers are girls.

    The success of Pathfinder, the Old School Renaissance, mainstream fantasy media, and the nostalgia of gamer kids reaching the 35 to 44 age range in creative fields like movies and television is likely a major factor in the renewed interest in D&D. Todd Kenreck explains on Forbes:

    The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King won 11 Oscars in 2004. 16 million people watched the premiere of season 7 of Game of Thrones this year. A serious interest in cinematic fantasy storytelling has steadily reached a fevered pitch and with the game D&D itself seeing a tremendous resurgence, this the perfect time for a Dungeons & Dragons movie or series that puts acting and story first. Like comic books before them, D&D the role-playing game is filled with stories, art, characters and world building that have been largerly left unused by television or film...The game has had impact on so many of the writers, actors, directors and show-runners making television and film today that is might not be a matter of if, but when.

    Will Joe Manganiello pull off a film that does D&D justice? A confluence of events -- the rise of social gaming, nostalgia for D&D, and the increasing accessibility of the D&D brand thanks to live streaming -- might be the perfect time for him to pull it off.

    Mike "Talien" Tresca is a freelance game columnist, author, communicator, and a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to http://amazon.com. You can follow him at Patreon.
    XP Ralif Redhammer gave XP for this post

  2. #2
    Man I hope the DnD film is good, there is so so much potential for mega bucks from good DnD films. Even if it means a Drizzt trilogy.

  3. #3
    With recorded play like Critical Role and Titansgrave. We are beginning to see RPGs pushed to new groups beyond the typical beck beardy types that use to represent the game. With this inclusivity comes more money and popularity.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Intrawebs
    Posts
    38,969
    There's definitely a confluence of factors. WotC did a really good job with 5E; media interest has helped mainstream the hobby; WotC has marketed (and continues to to market) 5E very well outside the existing player base; and geek media is now mainstream anyway - superheroes, Game of Thrones, etc, plus - as mentioned above - all those geek gamer kids from the 80s are now running things. It all combines. A strong D&D movie (if that's possible!) would be wonderful.
    XP Psikerlord# gave XP for this post

  5. #5
    I blame the beck beards.
    Laugh Shasarak, CapnZapp laughed with this post

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    400
    No mention of the 45+ crowd getting back into gaming? I feel old.
    XP safletcher gave XP for this post
    Laugh BrockBallingdark laughed with this post

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Morrus View Post
    There's definitely a confluence of factors. WotC did a really good job with 5E; media interest has helped mainstream the hobby; WotC has marketed (and continues to to market) 5E very well outside the existing player base; and geek media is now mainstream anyway - superheroes, Game of Thrones, etc, plus - as mentioned above - all those geek gamer kids from the 80s are now running things. It all combines. A strong D&D movie (if that's possible!) would be wonderful.
    Yeah. D&D is undoubtedly also benefiting (by extension) from what some are describing as a board gaming renaissance.
    XP Tony Vargas gave XP for this post

  8. #8
    Most likely. Gaming is more popular than it’s been in ages. But I think the term Golden Age also comes from the experiences of the people involved. Which is why a lot of times we don’t recognize our Golden Ages until they’re past. As awesome as gaming is, here and now, it’s hard to match that against when I was a kid, gaming with friends, back in the day. But all nostalgia aside, I think we are in a wonderful place for gaming, and it will hopefully just get better and better from here.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    314
    Sure seems that way to me. It's pretty great to witness.

  10. #10
    "While Wizards of the Coast, which manages the D&D franchise, won't share sales figures, reps tell the Daily News that Millennials (ages 25 to 34) presently make up the largest group of D&D players, followed closely by those aged 35 to 44 and 18 to 24 — and up to 30% of these gamers are girls."

    Sigh. And as we work to get more female gamers into the hobby, we still have media calling adult women "girls".

    And on topic, I think the game started to enter this new "golden age" shortly after the three core books released almost three years ago and everyone realized 5E was selling way more copies than expected.
    XP safletcher, Aldarc gave XP for this post

Quick Reply Quick Reply

Similar Threads

  1. Entering a Zone
    By Branduil in forum *Pathfinder, Starfinder, Older D&D Editions (4E, 3.x, 2E, 1E, OD&D), D&D Variants, OSR
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Friday, 29th May, 2009, 02:36 AM
  2. Entering a Web
    By Ki Ryn in forum *Pathfinder, Starfinder, Older D&D Editions (4E, 3.x, 2E, 1E, OD&D), D&D Variants, OSR
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: Monday, 22nd May, 2006, 07:51 PM
  3. Does entering melee provoke an AoO?
    By Ascii King in forum *Pathfinder, Starfinder, Older D&D Editions (4E, 3.x, 2E, 1E, OD&D), D&D Variants, OSR
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Monday, 11th October, 2004, 02:51 PM
  4. Help! Entering a new group.....
    By Nail in forum *General Roleplaying Games Discussion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: Saturday, 1st February, 2003, 08:07 PM
  5. So, who's entering the competition?
    By Morrus in forum *General Roleplaying Games Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Thursday, 24th January, 2002, 03:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •