5E Reliable Talent. What the what? - Page 19
  1. #181
    After reading through eighteen pages of comments I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Jeremy Crawford's explanation of passive skills being the minimum possible roll a character could get. That effectively gives every character something better than Reliable Talent on all skills starting at level one. My group started to use Crawford's description of passive skills being the minimum roll until our rogue hit 11th level and we saw that Reliable Talent was eliminated by that rule.

    Personally, I'm in the camp that says RT is better used as a way to speed up the game by turning rolls into narrative. Also, my response to the passive skills issue was to eliminate most use of passive skills, I only use them for perception and some special case investigation checks.
    XP Satyrn gave XP for this post

  2. #182
    Member
    Spellbinder (Lvl 16)



    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Canton, CT
    Posts
    1,488
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews

    Ý Block Ilbranteloth


    Ý Friend+
    Quote Originally Posted by cthulhu42 View Post
    Low skill DC's?

    Let's assume he's got a 20 Dex, so that's +5. He's 11th level, so that's a proficiency bonus of +4. Then he takes expertise in, say, Sleight of Hand, which doubles that prof bonus to +8 for a total of +13. So now he's disarming any trap and picking any lock with a DC 23 or lower automatically. Yeah, it's supposed to be, "reliable" but good grief! And I don't even really mind him having such high chances to beat those DC's; I mean, like you said, he's supposed to be a skill monkey. But to have absolutely no chance of failure seems really weird.

    And on the whole I'd much rather deal with permanent advantage to a feature than to have it be automatically successful 100% of the time (on 23 or lower DC's). That is just so... anticlimactic. If there's zero element of danger, what's the point?

    I'm not so worried about it in a dungeon delving situation since difficulties will ramp up as they get into higher levels. But the potential for abuse on a more mundane scale is almost too good to pass up.
    So a question for you. If youíre an expert at something, how often do you fail at something thatís medium difficulty? The reality is, when youíve reached a certain skill level in something, there are a lot of things below that level of skill that you can just do.

    Having said that, in my opinion, the DCs given in published APs are 5 points too easy. For example, the DC to detect the pits in Tomb of Horrors is 12. Now my complaint isnít really that itís for high level characters, although that is part of it. My complaint is that itís a tomb that has never been beaten in hundreds, if not thousands, of years. How is that possible if the traps are that easy to spot?

    The game is designed to allow just about anybody a chance. The number they seem to favor is 60% of success. Which means the exceptional have a very high chance of success.

    We altered the rules by looking at what sort of probabilities and advancement scheme we wanted. Thatís what Iíd recommend you do. Try to determine how youíd like the math to work, and then you can figure out what sort of modification youíd like to make.
    XP Satyrn gave XP for this post

  3. #183
    Member
    Grandmaster of Flowers (Lvl 18)

    Ovinomancer's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,769
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews

    Ý Block Ovinomancer


    Ý Friend+
    Quote Originally Posted by Ilbranteloth View Post
    So a question for you. If youíre an expert at something, how often do you fail at something thatís medium difficulty? The reality is, when youíve reached a certain skill level in something, there are a lot of things below that level of skill that you can just do.

    Having said that, in my opinion, the DCs given in published APs are 5 points too easy. For example, the DC to detect the pits in Tomb of Horrors is 12. Now my complaint isnít really that itís for high level characters, although that is part of it. My complaint is that itís a tomb that has never been beaten in hundreds, if not thousands, of years. How is that possible if the traps are that easy to spot?

    The game is designed to allow just about anybody a chance. The number they seem to favor is 60% of success. Which means the exceptional have a very high chance of success.

    We altered the rules by looking at what sort of probabilities and advancement scheme we wanted. Thatís what Iíd recommend you do. Try to determine how youíd like the math to work, and then you can figure out what sort of modification youíd like to make.
    Apparently you've never seen a master woodworker's scrap pile.

    Being an expert doesn't mean you don't make mistakes -- we're all human. It means that you can recognize your mistake quickly and assess whether or not you can correct it sufficiently, and you can conduct that correction efficiently. Being an expert doesn't remove mistakes, it means you have the experience to overcome mistakes. And also that you can anticipate where mistakes or most likely made and either plan to deal with them or to exploit them, depending on the endeavor.

  4. #184
    Quote Originally Posted by Ovinomancer View Post
    Apparently you've never seen a master woodworker's scrap pile.

    Being an expert doesn't mean you don't make mistakes -- we're all human. It means that you can recognize your mistake quickly and assess whether or not you can correct it sufficiently, and you can conduct that correction efficiently. Being an expert doesn't remove mistakes, it means you have the experience to overcome mistakes. And also that you can anticipate where mistakes or most likely made and either plan to deal with them or to exploit them, depending on the endeavor.
    But i would argue the same applies to other resolutions. You dont fail by making an error, recognizing it and correcting or resetting.

    A broken lockpick doesnt stop a master thief, they pull it out, grab anothet, finish.

    Sent from my VS995 using EN World mobile app

  5. #185
    Take a look at a good professional locksmith.
    They get pretty much everything open quite easily and fast without any damage to the lock.

    A woodworkers biggest enemy is that wood is a natural resources and thus can cause damage to the product without any fault being made by the artist.
    XP KahlessNestor gave XP for this post

  6. #186
    Member
    Spellbinder (Lvl 16)



    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Canton, CT
    Posts
    1,488
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews

    Ý Block Ilbranteloth


    Ý Friend+
    Quote Originally Posted by Ovinomancer View Post
    Apparently you've never seen a master woodworker's scrap pile.

    Being an expert doesn't mean you don't make mistakes -- we're all human. It means that you can recognize your mistake quickly and assess whether or not you can correct it sufficiently, and you can conduct that correction efficiently. Being an expert doesn't remove mistakes, it means you have the experience to overcome mistakes. And also that you can anticipate where mistakes or most likely made and either plan to deal with them or to exploit them, depending on the endeavor.
    Agreed to a degree. It's highly unlikely that a theoretical physicist will make a mistake on a simple algebra equation. Could it happen? Sure. Your woodworker isn't likely to have a lot of failed simple birdhouses. My point is simply that as you get better at what you do, the threshold of where you're likely to make mistakes rises.

    Despite the fact that most of us learned to walk so long ago that we don't even remember it, doesn't mean that we don't sometimes trip (and even injure ourselves severely, occasionally to the point of death). But that sort of random and extremely unlikely event isn't the sort of thing we typically model in a D&D game. So why do we persist with the idea that somebody with a +9 modifier to their skill can somehow fail at something that's a DC of 12, without significant mitigating circumstances? If the base is 10 (that is, your passive score is 10 + modifier). That is, unless circumstances warrant disadvantage (which can still be applied to a passive check), why do we still seem to insist that you can fail by making a bad roll at something that you automatically succeed at if you don't roll at all.

    Also note that "automatic success" also doesn't mean you don't make mistakes along the way. As you note, it could be that you did make a mistake, recognized it, corrected for it, and ultimately succeeded. That is, success, whether automatic due to a given score, or the result of a die roll, doesn't mean that the process of succeeding was perfect, just that the result was success.

    Which goes back to the original post. If the rogue is automatically succeeding at everything, that's because they aren't attempting anything that's really beyond their capability to succeed. If you think that they are capable of succeeding at too much, then either they aren't meeting enough challenging things, or maybe we're lowballing the difficulty of given tasks. That is, the issue isn't that they are automatically succeeding (although that's another debate that comes up a lot), but that they are automatically succeeding at too much.

    When setting a DC, I think the levels of difficulty are based on an individual who is untrained, or has very basic training. It's not really defined though.

    So picking a lock, for example. I personally think that's a very hard thing to do. Even with a medieval lock which is much simpler in design than today's locks. Would a person without any training and any modifiers be able to pick one? I don't think so. So I'd put picking a lock at a DC 20 at the lowest. That allows a 5% chance off success for even an untrained individual. I'd rather see it at a DC 25, because then you either have to have a very high natural skill, or some training to succeed. But the game isn't currently designed like that. It's designed so that a party of characters will have a chance to succeed at nearly anything. Not necessarily everybody in the party, but that somebody within the party will. We, on the other hand, don't care about that. We're more interested about what makes sense in the game world, and if that means something is too difficult for the PCs at that level, then they can come back and try it later. Or find another way, like breaking the lock, kicking in the door, a knock spell, or whatever. We don't alter the DC for the "designed level of the party," instead it's a question of what makes sense here.

    The benefit of this approach is that you design the probabilities around your expectations. So in the case of picking a lock, we generally think that only somebody with a natural high Dexterity combined with advantage will be able to pick a lock without training. A DC 25 meets that expectation. Somebody with some training and a high Dexterity, or more training with a lower Dexterity can also do it. That DC 25 works fine. A character with a +11 modifier? It's not automatic, but they won't fail often.

    Think of it a different way. In all sorts of shows, movies, etc., there are points where the characters have to pick a lock. It is very, very rare for them to ever fail. In most cases it doesn't even matter how much time it takes them. The dramatic contribution of the scene is one that establishes the circumstances of the following scenes. That is, they don't belong there, and presumably don't want to be caught. The drama isn't in the lockpicking skill, it's how the use of that skill frames the subsequent action. Sometimes it's used for comedic purposes, where somebody is taking too long to pick the lock, and somebody else is impatient and just kicks it in. Obviously remaining undetected is unimportant to them.

    But in the game, we often get hung up on playing the rules. That is, there's a rule for picking a lock, so therefore that rule must come into play. If that rule is "eliminated" due to an ability, then we feel that it's breaking the game. But the skills are really ways to differentiate the characters and their, well, skills. That is, they provide different options, each of which might be beneficial. If you consider the skill the important part, not rolling the dice to see if the skill succeeded, then it changes the entire discussion.

    For example, the goal is to get into the building. The rogue has a skill to pick the lock. The wizard has the knock spell. The fighter can kick the door down. Any one of them can break a window to get in. And any one of them can search the area and potentially find the key that's hidden nearby. Where's the drama? What makes one option more dramatic than the other? What drama is lost if the rogue can automatically succeed at picking the lock?

    The reality is, without something else, there really isn't any drama. Just different ways to get inside. Presumably breaking a window is the last option (or not really one at all) because they want to remain undetected. The knock spell, and even kicking in the door are also not desired for the same reasons. Otherwise there would be no debate. But it's the fact that they want to get in undetected that really matters, not the specific method of getting there.

    If these are low level characters, they might have to resort to another alternative. But if they are high level characters, wouldn't the expectation be that the rogue will just be able to pick the lock? Unless the lock is especially complex, or whatever, they've picked hundreds if not thousands of locks with the same basic design. Why are we concerned about failure at that point? We've moved past that point in the character's career.
    XP KahlessNestor, Satyrn gave XP for this post

  7. #187
    Member
    Grandmaster of Flowers (Lvl 18)

    Ovinomancer's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,769
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews

    Ý Block Ovinomancer


    Ý Friend+
    Quote Originally Posted by FieserMoep View Post
    Take a look at a good professional locksmith.
    They get pretty much everything open quite easily and fast without any damage to the lock.

    A woodworkers biggest enemy is that wood is a natural resources and thus can cause damage to the product without any fault being made by the artist.
    I've had the dubious pleasure of hiring a locksmith to gain access to property for which the keys were not available anymore (tenet issues, lost, tenet issues). The preferred method for locks is destructive opening and then replacement. At no time have I ever seen a locksmith actually take the time to delicately pick a lock. Usually, they punch the lock.

    For cars, sure, they use the slimjim method, but, if you talk to them, they don't like to because there's a high chance of damaging the mechanism. They'll usually get a waiver signed before attempting it. I have a close friend that did have his lock mechanism broken by a locksmith trying to open the door. The locksmith was unsuccessful, and the dealership had to get involved (at ridiculous expense) to cut a new key according to his VIN#. And then he had to have the lock mechanism replaced.

    So, no, locksmiths are very skilled, but their skills aren't at deftly picking locks without damaging the lock. They have tools illegal to own that make defeating locks much easier, but not without damage. The point here isn't that locksmiths are tremendously skilled (although they are skilled) to the point that they can defeat locks via finesse, but that society had restricted many of the tools that make defeating locks illegal to own, but locksmiths can legally use them.

    It needs to be accepted that the game grossly simplifies tasks, and also rests on fictional tropes of master thieves able to deftly defeat any mechanism with nothing but a light touch a set of lockpicks. It's not based on reality at all. As a trope, reliable expert is something we're familiar with as a common fantasy concept, and fits well into our let's pretend to be elves game. It's not based on how the real world works. Looking to the real world will not help us better relate to the trope.

  8. #188
    Member
    Grandmaster of Flowers (Lvl 18)

    Ovinomancer's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,769
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews

    Ý Block Ovinomancer


    Ý Friend+
    Quote Originally Posted by Ilbranteloth View Post
    Agreed to a degree. It's highly unlikely that a theoretical physicist will make a mistake on a simple algebra equation. Could it happen?
    BWAAAA! Dude, you just got a honest belly laugh and a tear from me. You can't be serious, right? You do know that theoretical physicists review their own work over and over and have colleges review their work over and over and then submit to peer reveiw and then whole world review and that, occasionally, even simple algebra mistakes still make it through, right?

    I'm an engineer, and I proof my stuff for simple arithmetic errors all the time, much less algebra and calculus ones (surprisingly few calculus errors, as that's most application that creates algebra to screw up). Why? Because I make them. And I'm a professional.

    This idea that someone highly trained in a skillset doesn't constantly make mistakes within that skillset is really, really inhuman thinking. Have you never watched a pro-basketball game? Those are the top 300 or so athletes in the world at that sport, chosen in a brutally Darwinian selection process, and highly paid. They make mistakes at their skill all the time. The hit percentage for free-throws is staggeringly low when you consider that these are literally the best of the best at that sport.

    Sure. Your woodworker isn't likely to have a lot of failed simple birdhouses. My point is simply that as you get better at what you do, the threshold of where you're likely to make mistakes rises.
    You'd be very surprised. My brother is a woodworker, and turns out furniture worth thousands of dollars at sale. He screws up simple stuff all the time -- but he knows when to toss a piece and start over or if he can still salvage it. He knows how to do the complex and hard things that other people don't, and has the experience to pull it off. He can do things that are amazing with wood. But he still makes mistakes, and sometimes at very easy tasks.

    Despite the fact that most of us learned to walk so long ago that we don't even remember it, doesn't mean that we don't sometimes trip (and even injure ourselves severely, occasionally to the point of death). But that sort of random and extremely unlikely event isn't the sort of thing we typically model in a D&D game. So why do we persist with the idea that somebody with a +9 modifier to their skill can somehow fail at something that's a DC of 12, without significant mitigating circumstances? If the base is 10 (that is, your passive score is 10 + modifier). That is, unless circumstances warrant disadvantage (which can still be applied to a passive check), why do we still seem to insist that you can fail by making a bad roll at something that you automatically succeed at if you don't roll at all.
    We also aren't often walking in high stress environments. The fall and injure rate during high stress events is much higher than average, and we aren't exactly simulating a stroll in the park when we're playing our elf game. Stress is a big reasons why basketball players make mistakes in games, why are we discounting it as a factor?

    Also note that "automatic success" also doesn't mean you don't make mistakes along the way. As you note, it could be that you did make a mistake, recognized it, corrected for it, and ultimately succeeded. That is, success, whether automatic due to a given score, or the result of a die roll, doesn't mean that the process of succeeding was perfect, just that the result was success.
    Well, in a six second task resolution window, it's hard to see how a mistake made doesn't cost at least another round of effort.

    Which goes back to the original post. If the rogue is automatically succeeding at everything, that's because they aren't attempting anything that's really beyond their capability to succeed. If you think that they are capable of succeeding at too much, then either they aren't meeting enough challenging things, or maybe we're lowballing the difficulty of given tasks. That is, the issue isn't that they are automatically succeeding (although that's another debate that comes up a lot), but that they are automatically succeeding at too much.

    When setting a DC, I think the levels of difficulty are based on an individual who is untrained, or has very basic training. It's not really defined though.
    Despite feeling these two paragraphs actively fight each other, let's look at the guidance in the rulebook -- DC 20 is hard. DC 25 is very hard. DC 30 is nearly impossible. There aren't DCs over that, and there's a strong argument that they shouldn't exist (not going to relitigate that). If we're stating up DCs based on the average guy, how many DC 25+s are you going to have out there? A skilled, modestly attributed commoner can't hit a DC 25 at all until they get a +3 proficiency, and then it's 1 in 20 times. A first level rogue, well attributed, will hit a DC 25 about 30% of the time. So, yeah, that seems very hard. A DC 30 is impossible for a non-expertise person of even the highest attribute until they get a proficiency of +5, or 13th level. For the expert, it becomes feasible, again at highest attribute, at 5th level, at a 10% chance. So the expert will still almost always fail at that task for quite some time. At best, they achieve a success rate of worse than 50% (at max proficiency).

    Enter reliable skill. At 11th, that same character suddenly has no chance to fail a DC 20 check, but still has the same chance to fail a DC 25 and DC 30 check. Reliable? Maybe, depends on the goal.

    Reliable talent doesn't mimic actual expertise in a skill.

    So picking a lock, for example. I personally think that's a very hard thing to do. Even with a medieval lock which is much simpler in design than today's locks. Would a person without any training and any modifiers be able to pick one? I don't think so. So I'd put picking a lock at a DC 20 at the lowest. That allows a 5% chance off success for even an untrained individual. I'd rather see it at a DC 25, because then you either have to have a very high natural skill, or some training to succeed. But the game isn't currently designed like that. It's designed so that a party of characters will have a chance to succeed at nearly anything. Not necessarily everybody in the party, but that somebody within the party will. We, on the other hand, don't care about that. We're more interested about what makes sense in the game world, and if that means something is too difficult for the PCs at that level, then they can come back and try it later. Or find another way, like breaking the lock, kicking in the door, a knock spell, or whatever. We don't alter the DC for the "designed level of the party," instead it's a question of what makes sense here.
    Well, you're wrong. A medieval lock is ridiculously simplistic by today's standards. The real barrier is knowing how to pick locks at all. Once you know how, an average medieval lock is almost trivial. Now, a master's piece lock, well, those were really tricky because many didn't function as key in lock style locks at all, but as puzzle locks.

    But, to return to your point, you're setting DCs too high based on your assumptions and not the guidance from the ruleset (which sets lock DCs much lower). When I judge the usefulness of a rule, I do it in the context of the rules it was written to work with, not on how you might interpret the actual difficulty of medieval style locks and your preferred house method of setting DCs.

    The benefit of this approach is that you design the probabilities around your expectations. So in the case of picking a lock, we generally think that only somebody with a natural high Dexterity combined with advantage will be able to pick a lock without training. A DC 25 meets that expectation. Somebody with some training and a high Dexterity, or more training with a lower Dexterity can also do it. That DC 25 works fine. A character with a +11 modifier? It's not automatic, but they won't fail often.

    Think of it a different way. In all sorts of shows, movies, etc., there are points where the characters have to pick a lock. It is very, very rare for them to ever fail. In most cases it doesn't even matter how much time it takes them. The dramatic contribution of the scene is one that establishes the circumstances of the following scenes. That is, they don't belong there, and presumably don't want to be caught. The drama isn't in the lockpicking skill, it's how the use of that skill frames the subsequent action. Sometimes it's used for comedic purposes, where somebody is taking too long to pick the lock, and somebody else is impatient and just kicks it in. Obviously remaining undetected is unimportant to them.
    I generally am not writing a movie script with my games, though. Also, I like using fail forward, so a failure doesn't cause the action to stop, it increases the tension or has a cost. A failure resulting in a picked but broken lock is good in a 'we didn't want anyone to know we were ever here' heist. A picked lock that results is a slip and a loud knock on the door is a good 'we're sneaking in and hope to not alert the guards' heist. A failed pick that still allows for the barbarian to kick the door in is good for, well, places where the barbarian kicking the door in is cool.

    Failure doesn't mean the story stops, it means the players have to find a new path or deal with consequences of an unintentional side effect. Failing a skill check, in my games, adds to my game, it doesn't cause it to crash to a stop.

    But in the game, we often get hung up on playing the rules. That is, there's a rule for picking a lock, so therefore that rule must come into play. If that rule is "eliminated" due to an ability, then we feel that it's breaking the game. But the skills are really ways to differentiate the characters and their, well, skills. That is, they provide different options, each of which might be beneficial. If you consider the skill the important part, not rolling the dice to see if the skill succeeded, then it changes the entire discussion.
    Not my problem, really, as I often allow an approach appropriate to a challenge to succeed. It actually the rules that are inhibiting my ability to set tension moments in this case. But reducing most DCs to automatic, I can't decide that an approach has a chance of failure and a penalty so a check is needed because the rules have taken that away.

    Ultimately, this really is my problem -- reliable talent removes things from the list of what can be a tension moment. It limits the possible fiction. And that's my problem, because of my playstyle choices.

    For example, the goal is to get into the building. The rogue has a skill to pick the lock. The wizard has the knock spell. The fighter can kick the door down. Any one of them can break a window to get in. And any one of them can search the area and potentially find the key that's hidden nearby. Where's the drama? What makes one option more dramatic than the other? What drama is lost if the rogue can automatically succeed at picking the lock?
    If there's no cost to making noise or destroying property, there is no drama, I wouldn't even ask for a check. My players would announce their actions, they'd be successful, I'd narrate the success, and we'd move to a bit that has some drama.

    If, though, as it would usually be, knocking or bashing in the door, or breaking a window would alert those in the building, then there's some drama. The rogue can pick the lock quietly on a success, and that's a tension filled moment -- a failure means going loud. But, reliable talent tells me I can't do this without artificially jacking up the DC on a lock put in a kickable door. It's not limiting the tension points in the game because the rogue can pretty much always pick the locks. While I can deal with this, it's irritating.

    The reality is, without something else, there really isn't any drama. Just different ways to get inside. Presumably breaking a window is the last option (or not really one at all) because they want to remain undetected. The knock spell, and even kicking in the door are also not desired for the same reasons. Otherwise there would be no debate. But it's the fact that they want to get in undetected that really matters, not the specific method of getting there.

    If these are low level characters, they might have to resort to another alternative. But if they are high level characters, wouldn't the expectation be that the rogue will just be able to pick the lock? Unless the lock is especially complex, or whatever, they've picked hundreds if not thousands of locks with the same basic design. Why are we concerned about failure at that point? We've moved past that point in the character's career.
    Because I want to retain the ability to determine if the circumstances allow for automatic success (something I'm actually quite generous on, given appropriate approaches), not have the rules tell me that this class of thing can't be a challenge anymore. Reliable talent doesn't make the rogue better at his craft, it restricts the challenges the DM can use in the narrative. Another reason I like the advantage option rather than the floor option for reliable talent. It still allows for a challenge to be failed, if remotely, across a broader range of possibilities while actually improving the rogue's craft against all possibilities.
    XP cthulhu42 gave XP for this post

  9. #189
    Quote Originally Posted by Ovinomancer View Post
    I've had the dubious pleasure of hiring a locksmith to gain access to property for which the keys were not available anymore (tenet issues, lost, tenet issues). The preferred method for locks is destructive opening and then replacement. At no time have I ever seen a locksmith actually take the time to delicately pick a lock. Usually, they punch the lock.
    So you got a bad one. In my country you can sue them if they destroy it without need for it is a pretty common scam to sell you a new lock afterwards.
    XP Inglorin gave XP for this post

  10. #190
    Member
    Grandmaster of Flowers (Lvl 18)

    Ovinomancer's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,769
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews

    Ý Block Ovinomancer


    Ý Friend+
    Quote Originally Posted by FieserMoep View Post
    So you got a bad one. In my country you can sue them if they destroy it without need for it is a pretty common scam to sell you a new lock afterwards.
    Yep, if you're down to insults about my ability to not be scammed and the professional service I hired, I think we're done with this conversation.

+ Log in or register to post
Page 19 of 25 FirstFirst ... 910111213141516171819202122232425 LastLast

Quick Reply Quick Reply

Similar Threads

  1. When -5/+10 starts becoming Very Reliable?
    By Zardnaar in forum D&D 5th Edition News, Rules, Homebrews, and House Rules
    Replies: 93
    Last Post: Wednesday, 16th March, 2016, 03:37 PM
  2. Reliable An Immediate Interrupts
    By Xyrlove Woodsoul in forum Pathfinder, Starfinder, Older D&D Editions (4E, 3.x, 2E, 1E, OD&D), D&D Variants, OSR
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Tuesday, 27th April, 2010, 09:31 PM
  3. FAQ: a reliable source?
    By Aaron in forum Pathfinder, Starfinder, Older D&D Editions (4E, 3.x, 2E, 1E, OD&D), D&D Variants, OSR
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: Thursday, 7th June, 2007, 11:24 PM
  4. Looking for reliable player (D&D)
    By Thordain in forum Talking the Talk
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Friday, 6th June, 2003, 02:32 AM
  5. FL need more reliable players.
    By okuth0r in forum Gamers Seeking Gamers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Monday, 7th April, 2003, 03:05 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •