Baldur's Gate III Announced; Powered by D&D 5E
  • Baldur's Gate III Announced; Powered by D&D 5E


    The developers of the Divinity: Original Sin series, Laria Studios, officially announced Baldur’s Gate III.

    The new game will use the D&D 5th Edition rules as the backbone for their system and the storyline will be set directly after the events in the upcoming adventure Baldur’s Gate: Descent into Avernus. The game will be released on PC and the new Google Stadia video game streaming service. The announcement came with a teaser trailer below. More information is expected at the video game and electronics conference E3 next week.

    The game isn't quite available for pre-order, but you can add it to your wishlist on Steam. The Steam listing also gives some idea of the features and gameplay options, as it lists Single Player, Multi-Player, Online Multiplayer, Local Multiplayer, Co-Op, Online Co-Op, Local Co-Op, Shared/Split Screen, and Cross-Platform Multiplayer.

    The announcement follows a tease last week with an image of the stylized "III" which left the title of the game as part of the filename.

    Warning: The trailer features some gruesome imagery which may not be suitable for all audiences and is definitely NSFW.

    Comments 255 Comments
    1. Paul Farquhar's Avatar
      Paul Farquhar -
      Quote Originally Posted by gyor View Post
      I guess we will see, although we know they are not forcing it out early.
      They seem to have a pretty tight deadline for November 2019 and two years is a pretty short development time for a game of this type.
    1. Paul Farquhar's Avatar
      Paul Farquhar -
      Quote Originally Posted by CapnZapp View Post
      Having the PHB content is the obvious goal here.

      They wouldn't want to exclude any PHB character option unless they have to for technical reasons.

      But expecting more than the PHB (in the basic start offering) comes across as wildly unrealistic.

      I can't come up with a single reason why they would want to give away for free when it's an easy sell if the game does well. And the game certainly does not need more options than the PHB to do well, it's not as if anyone is going to look at all those classes and races and say "blech, that's hardly any choice, I think I'll pass on this game"
      Actually, I do know a couple of people who where put off Pathfinder: Kingmaker because they where intimidated by the large number of choices at character creation, so more is not necessarily better.

      And there is an alternative way of looking at microtransactions: if the non-PHB races and subclasses are sold separately then you don't have to pay for options you aren't interested in playing.

      And we know that it is statistically proven that the majority of players will choose to play a male human fighter called Bob...
    1. gyor's Avatar
      gyor -
      https://youtu.be/-GPX69dNWDI

      It might just be the PHB options, it's hard to tell.
    1. gyor's Avatar
      gyor -
      https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.pcg...g-system%3famp

      5e style leveling is in, but it's causing them headaches.

      "Dungeons and Dragons’ leveling system is too slow for Baldur’s Gate 3"

      "Nevertheless, Larian is making a D&D game. Therefore: “We wanted to stick to it. So we’re figuring out ways of letting you still feel that you’re progressing in a meaningful manner, but in a videogame manner.”"
    1. Sacrosanct's Avatar
      Sacrosanct -
      I understand why there is skepticism, but I think it's unfair skepticism. I think people are subconsciously conflating D&D movies with D&D video games. I.e, D&D movies have a pretty bad track record. They mostly suck. So I think people are assuming a D&D video game will also suck based on that. However, D&D video games have a much better track record. The only one that really sucked in recent history was Sword Coast Legends. All the rest were either OK, or actually pretty good. The original BG games, Torment, Neverwinter Nights (and many of the expansions), Temple of Elemental Evil were all at least pretty decent. Excluding off genre games that just used the license of course.
    1. gyor's Avatar
      gyor -
      Quote Originally Posted by Sacrosanct View Post
      I understand why there is skepticism, but I think it's unfair skepticism. I think people are subconsciously conflating D&D movies with D&D video games. I.e, D&D movies have a pretty bad track record. They mostly suck. So I think people are assuming a D&D video game will also suck based on that. However, D&D video games have a much better track record. The only one that really sucked in recent history was Sword Coast Legends. All the rest were either OK, or actually pretty good. The original BG games, Torment, Neverwinter Nights (and many of the expansions), Temple of Elemental Evil were all at least pretty decent. Excluding off genre games that just used the license of course.
      The last one that was any good was Storm of Zehir expansion to NWN2, every single one has been aweful.

      So I understand the Skeptism, but I look at what has been said, and look at Larian's rep and that makes me hopeful.
    1. Gladius Legis -
      Quote Originally Posted by gyor View Post
      The last one that was any good was Storm of Zehir expansion to NWN2, every single one has been aweful.

      So I understand the Skeptism, but I look at what has been said, and look at Larian's rep and that makes me hopeful.
      Other than the Neverwinter MMO (which was more or less meh) and Sword Coast Legends (godawful), both of them from rather subpar developers, has there been any other D&D video games since NWN2? I recall D&D video games as a whole just dying off after that ...
    1. CapnZapp -
      Quote Originally Posted by gyor View Post
      5e style leveling is in, but it's causing them headaches.

      "Dungeons and Dragons’ leveling system is too slow for Baldur’s Gate 3"
      Given how even official adventures eschew the xp guidelines, and basically level up after specific chapters, I am having trouble seeing what the problem is.

      Or hand out twice the default monster xp, or whatever.

      What I'm really interested in is, didn't those old AD&D games, including Baldur's Gate, follow the official xp amounts?

      I can't recall ever hearing this complaint against 5E before. That you level up too slowly.

      Did you level up faster in AD&D?
    1. Parmandur's Avatar
      Parmandur -
      Quote Originally Posted by Gladius Legis View Post
      Other than the Neverwinter MMO (which was more or less meh) and Sword Coast Legends (godawful), both of them from rather subpar developers, has there been any other D&D video games since NWN2? I recall D&D video games as a whole just dying off after that ...
      Several games, though not RPGs strictly speaking. Idle Champions of the Realms, Tales of Candlekeep, etc.
    1. gyor's Avatar
      gyor -
      Quote Originally Posted by Paul Farquhar View Post
      They have already said they won't have everything from the PHB - you quoted it yourself.[/FONT][/COLOR][/LEFT]



      The original Baldur's Gate didn't have any gods as part of character creation. NWN2 and Pathfinder: Kingmaker are the only games I know to feature deity selection as part of character creation.
      I was refering to Classes and races, not say spells some out which might be too hard to do, like minor Illusion, Silent Illusion, Major Illusion, ect....
    1. gyor's Avatar
      gyor -
      Quote Originally Posted by CapnZapp View Post
      Given how even official adventures eschew the xp guidelines, and basically level up after specific chapters, I am having trouble seeing what the problem is.

      Or hand out twice the default monster xp, or whatever.

      What I'm really interested in is, didn't those old AD&D games, including Baldur's Gate, follow the official xp amounts?

      I can't recall ever hearing this complaint against 5E before. That you level up too slowly.

      Did you level up faster in AD&D?
      It lacks the constant gratification of frequent levej ups found in most video games.
    1. Kobold Avenger's Avatar
      Kobold Avenger -
      I can't see how leveling would be too slow for them since Divinity Original Sin 2 roughly has 20 levels in a normal playthrough. Unless it's one of those games where the story is meant to end at some point just above level 10.
    1. CapnZapp -
      Quote Originally Posted by gyor View Post
      It lacks the constant gratification of frequent levej ups found in most video games.
      What does?

      Sorry, what are you saying?
    1. Staffan's Avatar
      Staffan -
      Quote Originally Posted by CapnZapp View Post
      Given how even official adventures eschew the xp guidelines, and basically level up after specific chapters, I am having trouble seeing what the problem is.

      Or hand out twice the default monster xp, or whatever.

      What I'm really interested in is, didn't those old AD&D games, including Baldur's Gate, follow the official xp amounts?

      I can't recall ever hearing this complaint against 5E before. That you level up too slowly.

      Did you level up faster in AD&D?
      Not in the slightest. Though I guess it depends on how generous the DM was with story XP in 2e (1e was more objective in this manner, giving 1 XP per gp worth of treasure brought back home).

      But I think the tolerance for slow leveling was higher back in the day. The original Baldur's Gate had an XP cap of 89,000 XP, which translated to 7th level for single-classed fighters, paladins, rangers, wizards, and clerics, and 8th level for single-classed druids, thieves, and bards. That's for a game that takes 40-80 hours to play through. Today, I think that would be a hard sell.

      One of the problems is that games with frequent leveling, e.g. World of Warcraft, have many many more levels than D&D. WoW started with 60 levels, and I believe they're up to 120 now. That gives you a lot more room for frequent "dings", and even after you've reached the max level there are many goals left (reputations, gear, crafting skills, dungeons/raids, and so on). With only 20 levels (and it's likely the game won't go to 20), that's hard to do.
    1. Gradine's Avatar
      Gradine -
      Both Divinity: Original Sin games made you struggle to get much past 20. I think 23 is technically feasible in the first game if you go full murderhobo.
    1. gyor's Avatar
      gyor -
      https://www.gamespot.com/videos/is-b.../2300-6450054/

      Interesting interview, this one is longer then most. They still aren't asking the questions I would which is very frustrating.

      Another interview. https://youtu.be/n9VgaaNPVeo

    1. Paul Farquhar's Avatar
      Paul Farquhar -
      Quote Originally Posted by gyor View Post
      The last one that was any good was Storm of Zehir expansion to NWN2, every single one has been aweful.

      So I understand the Skeptism, but I look at what has been said, and look at Larian's rep and that makes me hopeful.
      Pathfinder: Kingmaker is good (better than SoZ). Siege of Dragonspear isn't bad either.

      It's just the ones WotC has had it's paws in that have been poor...
    1. gyor's Avatar
      gyor -
      Quote Originally Posted by Paul Farquhar View Post
      Pathfinder: Kingmaker is good (better than SoZ). Siege of Dragonspear isn't bad either.

      It's just the ones WotC has had it's paws in that have been poor...
      Kingmaker is good, bugs aside, but its not a Forgotten Realms game so I didn't count it.

      I can't speak to Dragonspear, but I have heard alot of distain for it, but that is all second hand.

      Anyways a podcast with some more info.

      https://www.reddit.com/r/DnD/comment...izards_of_the/

      The Ranger appears to be based on Mike Mearls Improved version of the class.
    1. Paul Farquhar's Avatar
      Paul Farquhar -
      Dungeons & Dragons isn't just the Forgotten Realms (and Golarion is basically the same thing, improved).

      One of Dragonspear's creators became a pet hate for alt-right trolls, and it attracted a lot of unfair criticism as a consequence. Not that it's perfect, but it's better than SoZ, and infinitely better than Sword Coast Leg Ends. The ending of Dragonspear is a bit weird because it's basically an extended plot hook for a Baldur's Gate 3 that will never happen.
    1. CapnZapp -
      Quote Originally Posted by Staffan View Post
      Not in the slightest. Though I guess it depends on how generous the DM was with story XP in 2e (1e was more objective in this manner, giving 1 XP per gp worth of treasure brought back home).

      But I think the tolerance for slow leveling was higher back in the day. The original Baldur's Gate had an XP cap of 89,000 XP, which translated to 7th level for single-classed fighters, paladins, rangers, wizards, and clerics, and 8th level for single-classed druids, thieves, and bards. That's for a game that takes 40-80 hours to play through. Today, I think that would be a hard sell.

      One of the problems is that games with frequent leveling, e.g. World of Warcraft, have many many more levels than D&D. WoW started with 60 levels, and I believe they're up to 120 now. That gives you a lot more room for frequent "dings", and even after you've reached the max level there are many goals left (reputations, gear, crafting skills, dungeons/raids, and so on). With only 20 levels (and it's likely the game won't go to 20), that's hard to do.
      Okay so he's just yet another eater of cake who gets upset he doesn't get to keep the cake too.

      Thank you for telling me what I need to know to ignore his "difficulties".
    Comments Leave Comment