View Profile: Hussar - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
Tab Content
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 PM
    Look, Keanu is already a superhero. The only logical Marvel character that Keanu could ever play is... Keanu Reeves! Look, he's like a younger, better, more awesome Chuck Norris. He deserves his own Comic book franchise.
    24 replies | 647 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:13 PM
    Hrm. Not sure how much I can add to this to be honest. I'm seeing where folks are coming from and I keep nodding my head as I'm reading. Frankly, thought, and perhaps this is just my own biases, something like this: basically sounds like a scene to me. As soon as you decide which of those options to go with, you have a scene. That you like a looser structure is perfectly fine. ...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:35 AM
    Let me start with: "I don't have much interest, if any at all, in this conversation...so I'm not particularly interested in getting drawn back in." However, I think I have some virtual ink to spill on the internet on this one. For my money, the two have significant differences in TTRPGs. In TTRPGs, I associate "scene" with "a discrete unit of play, whereby situational framing >...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    4 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:46 PM
    Umm. Aren’t location and scene synonyms? As in “place where stuff happens “? What’s the difference?
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:19 PM
    We’re a bit longer. 3 hour sessions and generally about 50-80 sessions per campaign.
    14 replies | 314 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:16 PM
    But as soon as the player tells you his intentions to go to the casino you know what the next scene is. It’s already established- go to the casino to confront Iron God Meng. How would the players even think to find a tailor? They have stated what they want to do. Do your players routinely change direction before the even start? But, in any event you have a scene - the casino. Whether you...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 09:28 PM
    But, see, at least three other people - dragoner, Michael Silverbane and myself WOULD describe this as bog standard narration and a scene. The fact that you happen to be using an idiosyncratic definition of the word seems to be the major sticking point here. Had you actually posted something like this a long time ago, when asked repeatedly to do so, would have saved a LOT of time. So,...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 02:15 PM
    Bedrockgames - you didn't answer my question. The PC's encounter an NPC that they have never met before. The reason isn't all that important, although that will obviously come up a bit later when resolving the situation. But, how do you convey information about the NPC to the players without any narration? What does that even look like? You even admit that you "describe him". What do...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:08 AM
    Ok, umm, how does this work? You have an NPC that the players have never seen before in a place that they have never been before. Now, how do you explain the scene (ie narrate) to the players without actually describing the scene, describing the NPC or anything like that? But, to be fair, if that's the definition of narration that you're working from - that players are passive listeners to...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 06:52 AM
    Meh, semantics. Scene, situation, it's the same thing. You have the characters, you have the NPC's and you have some sort of action going on. Nothing about narration has anything to do with how things resolve. The point is, you have to introduce that NPC bully. Which means you have to narrate the scene where that bully appears. The point is, you still have to narrate. It's kinda like...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 11:48 PM
    Umm, where did the situation come from? Who initiated the situation? Who set the location, the opponents (or allies or whatever is being reacted to)? Now, there are games where the answer to that might be "anyone at the table", but, outside of those games, by and large, it's the GM/DM who is setting the stage so to speak. Sure, the PC's open the door, but, it's the DM who describes what's...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 11:41 PM
    Yeah, that's a better way of phrasing it. Sure, I'll agree with that.
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 09:10 PM
    I'm with Aldarc here. I don't think the answer is a single general use Urban Fantasy TTRPGing system with theme/premise-neutral mechanics to rule them all (this almost always leads to an overwhelming GM presence in play trajectory to manufacture an experience...typically putting players in a significantly more passive position than in a game like Blades in the Dark). This is precisely why I...
    70 replies | 2047 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 03:16 PM
    Ah ok. (I’m asking this out of a position of ignorance) So when someone refers to “Urban Fantasy” in TTRPGing, are they referring to “a malleable game/system without a tight play premise baked in so it can be drifted to (say) the modern focus of ‘paranormal romance’ or something similar?”
    70 replies | 2047 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 03:14 PM
    Well, kinda sorta. Look at that description of the Dursley's above. That's adopting a very specific "voice". It's a sing songy story telling voice because the story is written for 10 year olds. It is a very deliberate choice. Your choice of a conversational tone is deliberate since you don't like a more prose style pattern. But, make no mistake, you are still narrating the scene. ...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 09:28 AM
    Sorry, Pemerton, but, I'm really having trouble tracking the changes you are making here. Can you actually write out the paragraph that you think is more conversational? Trying to move back and forth between three different posts and two different pages means I am losing track of what you're trying to say. And, please, tone down the level of grammatical analysis. It's extremely difficult to...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 02:48 AM
    Something similar to that play anecdote that you're mentioning above happened in my 2nd 4e game that went 1-30. While that was a Bladesinger rather than a Fighter, it was all martial, so its applicable. It was mid-Paragon Tier. While the Druid and Rogue dealt with an endless tide of mooks, the Bladesinger was locked in a duel with the Captain of the Guard (CotG). The player wanted it to...
    7 replies | 388 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 01:21 AM
    I can walk into your house and tell you which bedroom is a guest bedroom just by looking (assuming you have one). That's not really a stumbling block to me. But, effectively, pemerton, we're back to vocabulary differences. You're simply using simpler language. So, is it fair to say that the division, for you, between conversational and prose is vocabulary choice? After all, you didn't...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 12:36 AM
    And, something to remember is that the ship is coming sometime. So, making some defensive preparations and then holing up makes sense for the smugglers. They aren't terribly interested in fighting.
    4 replies | 214 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 09:34 PM
    Does Blades in the Dark not qualify as Urban Fantasy? Grimdark, cutthroat urban setting (Duskvol) - check Paranormal (overruneth and all kinds) - check Magic - check Factions/tribes embroiled in endless war to ascend hierarchy - check
    70 replies | 2047 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 03:48 AM
    Ah, now, there, I think is one of the bigger divides that's going on. For me, while dramatic pacing is one thing (I'll let them shank the villain too), but, in general game pacing is something I've very, very conscious of. Gaming, as it is, tends to have a lot of down time and anything I can do to speed things up is good IMO. Which means that things like boxed text, for example, are a huge...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 03:43 AM
    I'm going to echo the others here. If you're feeling the time pinch, it might be a great idea just to buy a "campaign in a box" sort of module. One of the WotC adventure path offerings or something off the DM's Guild. Something you can basically just run from the book. And, while that's going on, you've bought yourself lots of breathing room for time to spend prepping your next campaign.
    39 replies | 1097 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 02:09 AM
    LOL. So, essentially, all Saelorn is seeing of this thread is Bedrockgames talking to himself? Unless Imaro somehow avoided the block hammer. ROTFLMAO. That has to be the WEIRDEST thread to see. :D :lol: Ok, so, yeah, Aldarc and Bedrockgames, I'd put things like diction, organization, that sort of stuff, under the umbrella of "presentation". How you get the information from A to B,...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 05:52 AM
    Now, this I can agree with. Unfortunately, in the other thread, I got shouted down for equating prose with presentation. I was told, in no uncertain terms, that how we presented the information isn't the issue, but, rather, it's all about the words. So, you can see why I might be a bit confused. Well, again, I might argue vocabulary is an issue in there. After all, it's not an every...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 02:35 AM
    Wait, what? So, vocabulary IS the important distinction between conversational and prose language? Now I'm really confused. Frankly Aldarc, I'm really having trouble parsing your argument through the snark. Could you please, in simple terms, outline what your argument actually is then? Because, honestly, I wasn't trying to misrepresent anything. I honestly believed that you were...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 01:48 AM
    Wow, you folks are actually engaging SAelorn in his metagaming rabbit hole? You guys are brave.
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 01:38 AM
    See, ok, Bedrockgames, but, what you're talking about is vocabulary choice. Fair enough. But, Aldarc has insisted, pretty vehemently, all the way along that vocabulary choice doesn't matter. And, you have never contradicted him. So, are you disagreeing with Aldarc? It appears that you are, but, I want to be very sure. It's not about "blurring dualities". It's that your side of the...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 12:55 AM
    But, that's the problem Bedrockgames. What constitutes "boxed text style" prose and what is just "conversational"? Most of the time, there isn't a hugely detectable difference. Most boxed text is pretty straight forward description - "the room is such and such big, there are so and so doors, the furnishings are this and that and there's a such and such inhabitant in the room that wants to eat...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 12:44 AM
    Wow. Bitter much? Just because you got spanked once in a thread, you need to carry that baggage over here too? I proved it sufficiently over there as well - the use of words like "wield" are outside of standard conversation simply because standard conversation doesn't use words like that. This isn't opinion, this is actual fact. Sure, "halberd" isn't a standard conversational word either,...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 11:43 AM
    Heh. When the premise of the thread is clearly stated, we actually get to discuss the issue rather than spend 15 pages debating what the conversation is actually about. So, for that, thank you Bedrockgames. :D I'm pretty much in the "it depends on the game" camp. I generally find that word choice is going to be necessary as a DM/GM simply because it's virtually impossible to separate...
    181 replies | 4059 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 08:47 AM
    Wow. it just never stops does it. A. It doesn't offend me therefore it's not offensive. B. Folks are just looking for something to be offended about so they can feel good about themselves for opposing it. C. People are just too stupid to actually know what's really going on, but, I'm smarter than everyone else, so look at my superiority and be amazed. Did I miss any of the typical...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 05:19 AM
    Nice Celebrim. Folks that disagree with you are now delusional. Yeah, that's going to go over well. Of course, it's convenient when you ignore 2/3rds of the examples I posted to fixate on the one that maybe you can argue with. That's pretty much par for the course. Look, it's pretty simple. Early D&D draws very heavily from the pulps. Yes? We can agree on that? Genre pulps of the...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 03:04 AM
    It’s not really that hard to find colonialist themes in early dnd. Isle of Dread is a start as is Keep on the Borderlands. The Giants modules aren’t a bad example, nor are the Drow modules. While Saltmarsh isn’t too bad, the later modules are all about the (predominantly white) humans being threatened by the lizard folk and sahuagin. Finding colonialist parallels there isn’t much of a...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 09:47 PM
    It's getting better. It's so happy!!!!
    106 replies | 3931 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 01:37 PM
    Maxperson, you realize you have it backwards right? The tournaments came first THEN AD&D. AD&D was an attempt to codify what was happening at tournaments. That's why tournament play is actually mentioned more than a few times in the AD&D DMG. Look, we get it. You played AD&D with 3 people. Great. Can you not understand that that wasn't typical of the time? Tournament tables were MUCH...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 08:38 AM
    Why not? It's not like AD&D had a "core rules" divide. The modules were just as "official rules" as anything else. Now, if most modules were 2-3 PC's, then I might agree with your point. However, most of the modules were of the "6-9" characters variety. Dragonlance baselined with 8 characters. And, I would point out that this is precisely what I was talking about - people's...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 09:46 PM
    Article that discusses Baldur's Gate 3. Mearls (who still ruins everything) discusses the possibility of a revised Ranger and how we might be seeing a playtest this summer. https://kotaku.com/the-ranger-class-is-getting-some-changes-in-d-d-and-ba-1835659585
    106 replies | 3931 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 06:36 AM
    Yeah, I realized I said PC's and I should have said "characters". There would likely be 3-6 players and a mitt full of NPC's as well. At least, that's what the presumption was. Your the one telling me that the presumption was 4 PC's. That an encounter should have multiple dragons because I have so many PC's. But, that's not true. I had the standard number of characters that was...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 04:46 AM
    The difference though, I think is that you have a pretty wide variety of modules to choose from. Whether it’s Tomb of Annihilation or Dragon Heist, you do get to see a pretty broad depth. It took a while to get that in the early days.
    17 replies | 843 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 04:43 AM
    But none of this changes the fact that Jayne was untrustworthy.
    306 replies | 8166 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 04:29 AM
    Whoops double post. My bad.
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 04:28 AM
    See this is why I have such a hard time taking you seriously Maxperson. You obviously never played adnd. 6-9 pcs was the standard group. Four pcs is a 3e thing.
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 04:22 AM
    Well. That’s fair I suppose. If the group is allowed to execute your character for stepping out of line, then your alignment doesn’t matter too much.
    306 replies | 8166 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 18th June, 2019, 10:52 AM
    Meh, the dragon had a non-zero chance of being asleep when you got there. :D And, again, given that level of a party, you've got so much fire protection that the breath weapon is a joke. And, let's not forget, we're cherry picking the biggest non-unique monster in the 1e monster manual here. Most other monsters were nowhere near this dangerous. There's a pile of variables here. My point is,...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 18th June, 2019, 09:07 AM
    Heh. As the sort of genesis of this thread, thought I'd pop in. Yeah, I'll agree with pretty much everything said here. On one hand you've got those like me that cut their teeth on D&D modules. I did. I admit it. We were module junkies and most of my formative play years were spent running various modules. OTOH, you've got other folks who never touched one at all who likely have VERY...
    17 replies | 843 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 18th June, 2019, 08:39 AM
    Now, how exactly did you manage to get that couple of tons of treasure out of the lair without fighting the dragon? Again, why did folks avoid combat when the PC's after about 6th level were FAR more powerful than anything they were facing? And Ancient Huge Red Dragon had 92 HP (IIRC). That was about 1 round of damage output for a 9th level party of 6-9 PC's.
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Tuesday, 18th June, 2019, 04:49 AM
    B/X - The tight, holistic focus of design around its play paradigm. - The Exploration Turn/Rest > Wandering Monster Clock > Resource Attrition/Risk Reward Cycle Loop. - Monster Reactions/Morale. - Gold for xp. 4e - (Again) The tight, holistic focus of design around its play paradigm.
    51 replies | 2087 view(s)
    5 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 17th June, 2019, 12:04 PM
    Well, kinda sorta. Sure, the total would only be a small percentage of kill xp. Monsters weren't worth that much xp. But, in order to get that other percentage - the GP value - by and large you did it by killing the monster that was guarding it. So, yeah, the percentages were mostly for treasure, I totally agree. But, in order to get that treasure, most of the time, the solution was to beat...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 17th June, 2019, 08:03 AM
    Ok, ok. I surrender. 1e players were renowned throughout the hobby, throughout all the history of RPG's as the greatest, most wonderful roleplayers of all time who never once picked up a d20 unless they absolutely had to and solved nearly every single encounter through spectacular exposition and wonderous words of wisdom. Now, with the revisionist history out of the way, can we get back to...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Monday, 17th June, 2019, 04:13 AM
    Like a lot of things AD&D, it was pretty schizophrenic. For example, while you can talk about xp for "tricking" monsters being in the 1e DMG, you also have the training rules. A fighter that didn't fight was actively penalized by being forced to take longer to train and spending far, far more money on training, for example. In 2e, while there were "bonus Xp tables" again, fighters ONLY...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    2 XP
  • steenan's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 08:38 PM
    Your characterization screams "Dogs in the Vineyard" to me. It's a great game because, despite being about defenders of faith and faithful and containing supernatural evil, it's not a game of "us versus them". You have the rules of faith. Then you get faced with situations that are much more complicated. It's obvious that there is sin, that the demons are at work. But telling the good from...
    22 replies | 674 view(s)
    4 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 10:03 AM
    I disagree. If your character is consistent, reliable, dependable and never impulsive, in what way is that character chaotic? What about any of those descriptors would lead an observer to the conclusion that this character is chaotic? As far as “policing” goes, I’m not really sure where you are getting that. I guess my question to the player would be the same as my question to you - if this...
    306 replies | 8166 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Saturday, 15th June, 2019, 04:19 AM
    I disagree. Observable behaviour is the only determinant of alignment. Intention means nothing in an objective alignment system. People are evil because the DO evil things. I can think nasty thoughts all day long but if I’m outwardly kind to everybody then dnd says I’m good.
    306 replies | 8166 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Friday, 14th June, 2019, 04:45 PM
    Yeah, like I said...I was unable to click on the link to verify. Looks like they are starting up April Fools early this year :p
    8 replies | 685 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Friday, 14th June, 2019, 02:40 PM
    The timing is suspect, too. WoTC and the D&D devs are well known for having fun during April 1st.
    8 replies | 685 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Friday, 14th June, 2019, 02:24 PM
    This is unconfirmed as I have not been able to click on the link to verify the source, but according to the blurb on this article: "Starting in April 2020, the iconic Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) will instead be called Dungeon(s) and/or Dragon(s), abbreviated D&/D." http://www.boardgamelinks.com/links/news_link/133336 Has anyone been able to confirm this? What are your thoughts if it is...
    8 replies | 685 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Friday, 14th June, 2019, 02:07 PM
    Ok, so I understand your position. So I guess I just have a few questions/thoughts: 1) Why can’t Aptitude Bias run the other direction (as so many do); overestimating the importance of a honed Skill-set or natural affinity? 2) In the last several years on these boards, we’ve seen a LOT of instances of people who are articulate, well-read, tenured GMs struggle significantly in one or both...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Friday, 14th June, 2019, 11:29 AM
    See, I've never understood this. Like I said, sure, in the early levels, say 1-3, I get it. You want to be pretty careful about not biting off more than you can chew. But, after that? Why would you avoid a fight? You were almost always guaranteed to win. The odds of losing a fight were pretty darn slight. And, even then, by 9th level, you have access to raise dead, so, big deal, you...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Friday, 14th June, 2019, 07:42 AM
    Lanefan, I'm not sure I agree with your premise. AD&D, while lethal at low levels, was not particularly dangerous at higher levels. Granted, save or die effects might have made it more dangerous, but, most save or die effects are not a result of combat - poisons, traps, that sort of thing. By the time the PC's were about 6th or 7th level, they were among the most powerful combatants in the...
    350 replies | 11017 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Thursday, 13th June, 2019, 10:26 PM
    Citing the above, I want to make sure I've captured your position before I attempt to move the conversation forward. To do so, I'm going to also cite the below from me: Is your position that I (and others) have a blind spot for the gravity of the amplification effect I cite above (or further still, that it is indeed a causal effect) because of natural ability/decades of honing the crafts...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Thursday, 13th June, 2019, 09:42 PM
    Heck, when I played a binder, I looked forward to making bad pacts, to the point where I'd just stop rolling and declare that I made bad pacts. It was more fun.
    77 replies | 2975 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Thursday, 13th June, 2019, 07:28 PM
    The former. my color scheme is default text on black background of that helps (I’m computer incompetent so that is the best I got).
    26 replies | 680 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Thursday, 13th June, 2019, 07:21 PM
    YOU ARE CORRECT SIR Invisible text in other thread and linked thread.
    26 replies | 680 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Thursday, 13th June, 2019, 07:09 PM
    The text in the bottom quote is visible to me.
    26 replies | 680 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Thursday, 13th June, 2019, 07:49 AM
    Shhhh, shhhhh, shhhh, I got pilloried for several pages for suggesting that north is the top of a map. Quiet, quiet. The map police will come and drag you into the most bizarre, meaningless conversations ever. :p
    7 replies | 671 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Wednesday, 12th June, 2019, 06:48 PM
    "That's my secret captain...I'm always angry." -Bruce Banner/The Hulk
    53 replies | 2044 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Wednesday, 12th June, 2019, 04:36 PM
    I think the fault line here is going to be if you answer “yes” to the below two questions, and pretty much all iterations possible of good/bad/mediocre on either side of the balance. I would have to answer “yes” to all of them because I neither conceive nor have I experienced anything approximating a tight (or even shabby) coupling between the two. I’m like most people; good at some...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Wednesday, 12th June, 2019, 02:14 PM
    I've always been a fan of house-ruling that Berserkers don't feel the effects of exhaustion while raging. Thematically appropriate, and it makes using frenzy a bit more tempting.
    53 replies | 2044 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 12th June, 2019, 07:05 AM
    I did rather like the cleric spell spheres. It made it pretty easy to make very thematic cleric classes. I MISS the binder. I would love to play that again but, that's more of a mechanics thing. Lorewise? I miss the days when D&D had virtually no lore at all and things were wide open and I didn't have to listen to canon cops bitch and whine about how this or that was changed by this or...
    77 replies | 2975 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Wednesday, 12th June, 2019, 12:02 AM
    But of course you’re not victim blaming at all by implying that the folks here were being dishonest in their reactions. :erm: Good grief. You have a very strange definition of cruel if it’s okay in your mind to drive people away from a table because of the content (the best reaction would be to walk away) but apparently not letting someone drive people away in the first place is a bridge...
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 11:08 PM
    The truly frustrating thing about these conversations is we have to spend so much time on hypothetical situations that the actual issue never gets dealt with. I mean when some guy can get staggeringly drunk, stalk a woman, assault security staff and we STILL have to debate whether it’s okay to socially sanction him, it just staggers belief. Tell you what. Go into your workplace and begin...
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 08:41 PM
    I feel like there is a teeny tiny excluded middle between MAXIMUM TERSENESS (SUNDAY SUNDAY SUNDAY) and exposition economy (while still managing the key components of dramatic device) :)
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 08:31 PM
    This is so much more entangled than I ontrmdrf. EDIT - (Lol how about INTENDED. My phone autocorrected to ontrmdrf. Makes sense). Ok, let me pose a simple question. Is it possible to be very good at conflict framing (a) and resolution (b) yet be mediocre in words usage on the journey from a to b? Is the inverse possible (poor at framing and resolution but beautiful prose/oratory)?
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 08:07 PM
    lowkey13 I think you’re more or less saying what I said in my initial post in this thread: Framing and understanding of dramatic device (arc composition and pacing, tropes) are fundamentally tethered. Insofar as they are (and they are), if one wants to fold “understanding and deftness in deployment of dramatic device” into “literary”, then we’re going to have a (self-imposed imo)...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 06:53 PM
    Couple things: 1) In the spirit of this thread, I was trying to demonstrate that the framing of the creature is hierarchically more important than the words used to depict it (though again, they matter...they’re just lower in the hierarchy). 2) If you aren’t thematically framing a “bogeyman” as a bogeyman, then it seems pretty apt to point out that the situation the PCs are confronted with...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 04:15 PM
    Just want to say a bit of a my bad. I misread part of the blog post about someone trying to gain publicity. My misread. Thanks for correcting me. I’m actually a little disappointed that the person in question would not have been identified by the con. I would think that it’s in public interest to disseminate the fact that someone was banned for bad behaviour so that others can decide if...
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 01:41 PM
    Heh, irony is a wonderful thing. Bedrockgames is complaining that folks are rushing to judgement and we're negatively impacting this guy's life without learning the facts all the while not bothering to actually spend any time learning the facts that are IN THIS THREAD. That's a whole lot of irony right there. So, folks, the moral of the story is, actually do a bit of due diligence before...
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 12:22 PM
    Bedrockgames - did you read the blog posting that was linked? Or did you skip a bunch of pages. Because, I think that you might be missing a LOT of information here.
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 12:21 PM
    Not sure if this can be used or not, but, the 1 million square foot island might be useful: https://www.deviantart.com/zatnikotel/gallery/69418922/Island-One-Million
    7 replies | 671 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 12:17 PM
    Oh, please. 1. What kind of impact is this having on the life of the GM? He can't run games at conventions? Oh, noes, the horrors and despair. Again, if I was at a job and I screwed up on this kind of level, I'd get fired from my job and I wouldn't be allowed to work at that company any more. Is that "mob mentality"? And, if it's just "Oh, well, he can't run at this con this year, but,...
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 12:07 PM
    Figured I'd start a thread here to try to collect as many GoS resources as I could in one place. Here's a little something I whipped up for your players - it's the region around Saltmarsh (I'm using the default Greyhawk setting). Note, it IS oriented North to the top, which might be disturbing for some viewers. :D
    7 replies | 671 view(s)
    5 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 10:55 AM
    No, what you are seeing is folks looking for the "mob mentality" and not seeing any in this case. And other folks defending the GM in question from the hypothetical mob this out to get him.
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 04:20 AM
    Your threads suck! And you're terrible! And we hate you! More stuff!
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 04:13 AM
    Fantastic idea. ((heads off to unsubscribe from the thread))
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Hussar's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 04:05 AM
    Let's be fair here. How much effort are you actually going to expend on a news story where a guy gets booted out of a gaming convention? Sure, they may not have the details exactly right, but, by and large, they've got the gist - guy goes way beyond the pale when running a game, players complain on Twitter, guy gets expelled from Con. That's pretty much the long and the short of the story. ...
    419 replies | 18339 view(s)
    5 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Monday, 10th June, 2019, 07:16 PM
    No worries. If your saying that conversation with some pals while you're at dinner is different than TTRPG conversation, then sure. TTRPG conversation is structured such that it produces an evolving gamestate and the participant experience that goes with that. The former does have structure, but its more etiquette and cue-driven (so different in some ways, similar in others) and its purpose...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Raunalyn's Avatar
    Monday, 10th June, 2019, 04:10 PM
    No, but Nic Cage's teeth weren't included on the list. An oversight, methinks...
    33 replies | 1110 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Monday, 10th June, 2019, 03:55 PM
    I haven't been following this thread. I'm assuming the above contrast or dichotomy you're trying to draw is something essential to this thread? But if you're looking for an answer (insofar as I'm even remotely capable of inferring what you're looking for from this scant bit)...how about... Probably both? It seems to me that if a bogeyman creature of folklore with specific thematic...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Manbearcat's Avatar
    Monday, 10th June, 2019, 03:22 PM
    So the Qallupilluit is quintessential bogeyman mythology. For bogeyman mythology to be thematically potent, it has to have some way to hook into the PC's childhood or folklore, otherwise, its just another creepy monster. So this is actually the perfect example where a GM's deftness of framing is hierarchically the apex currency in the purchase of a great gaming moment. "Your little...
    1473 replies | 42737 view(s)
    1 XP
More Activity
About Hussar

Basic Information

About Hussar
Location:
Fukuoka, Japan
Sex:
Male
Age Group:
Over 40

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
22,879
Posts Per Day
4.21
Last Post
GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION? Yesterday 01:13 PM

Currency

Gold Pieces
31
General Information
Last Activity
Yesterday 01:13 PM
Join Date
Monday, 9th August, 2004
Product Reviews & Ratings
Reviews Written
1

9 Friends

  1. God Returns God Returns is offline

    Member

    God Returns
  2. Manbearcat Manbearcat is online now

    Member

    Manbearcat
  3. Merkuri Merkuri is offline

    Member

    Merkuri
  4. MurderHobo1 MurderHobo1 is offline

    Member

    MurderHobo1
  5. Raunalyn Raunalyn is offline

    Member

    Raunalyn
  6. Rechan Rechan is offline

    Member

    Rechan
  7. sev sev is offline

    Member

    sev
  8. Southern Oracle Southern Oracle is offline

    Member

    Southern Oracle
  9. steenan steenan is offline

    Member

    steenan
Showing Friends 1 to 9 of 9
Page 1 of 11 12345678910 ... LastLast

Tuesday, 25th June, 2019


Monday, 24th June, 2019


Sunday, 23rd June, 2019


Saturday, 22nd June, 2019



Page 1 of 11 12345678910 ... LastLast
Page 1 of 55 123456789101151 ... LastLast

Saturday, 22nd June, 2019

  • 01:54 AM - Aldarc mentioned Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    ... It's not about "blurring dualities". It's that your side of the argument isn't quite as clear as you might think. It's confusing. You're saying that vocabulary matters. Aldarc is very strongly saying that vocabulary doesn't. So, which is it? Now, me, I think I agree with you - vocabulary matters. Now, you don't think there's much value in using an extended vocabulary - that you "don't use big adjectives". Fair enough. That's where you and I disagree. I think that most DM's actually do slip into "big adjectives", mostly subconsciously, depending on what game you happen to be playing. But, Aldarc would say that we're both wrong and that "big adjectives" ISN'T what delineates conversation from boxed text. And, frankly, if vocabulary isn't the delineating element, I'm at a loss as to what is. What separates conversational language from prose language if it's not vocabulary choice? Is it false starts and repetition (both hallmarks of conversation vs reading)? What? Hussar, I would strongly appreciate it if you would stop constructing strawman arguments with my name attached and insisting that I am strongly saying anything that we both know you can't back up with evidence. It's rude and you're being a dick. Thankfully, I'm confident that Bedrockgames will exercise more sense than to bite at your misrepresentations of what I have said.

Friday, 21st June, 2019

  • 01:42 PM - Maxperson mentioned Hussar in post Why are we okay with violence in RPGs?
    I grew up in a very, very religious community. I think delusional is a strong word but I do think Celebrim is hitting on something that is real. There does seem to be a religious like impulse in the chasing of perfection here. And there is an ultimate evil that we are trying to purge (even when, as you yourself point out, it isn't fully evil itself, it is just imperfect---referring to your Tolkien example). And it does seem like the moment people disagree they start getting viewed as if they are the evil itself as well. Yep. As soon as I pointed out that Hussar is jumping at shadows, he demonized me and then left the thread to get away from "Satan."
  • 01:21 PM - Aldarc mentioned Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    I'm pretty much in the "it depends on the game" camp. I generally find that word choice is going to be necessary as a DM/GM simply because it's virtually impossible to separate running a game from any level of performance. We always choose specific language to fit the game, genre, mood and whatnot, which is, IMO, going to nudge things away from the conversational and towards the prose. This came up in the other thread where words like "wield" were used. That's a deliberate word choice for a fantasy RPG. You'd never use it in an SF RPG, for example. Han Solo wields his blaster? I don't think so. If we're playing a fantasy RPG, we're going to draw on fantasy language, probably subconsciously. If we play a modern RPG, our language is going to change.Just like in the other thread, you continually failed (miserably) to demonstrate that words like "wield" are non-conversational or "a deliberate word choice for a fantasy RPG." IMO, the phrase "wielding a gun", for example, is conversational...

Monday, 17th June, 2019

  • 03:45 PM - lowkey13 mentioned Hussar in post On the Inscrutability of AD&D and Ye Olde Styles of Play
    So, a recent comment in a thread had me thinking to myself, "Self, why do people say that all of AD&D was a certain way? Is this like a comedy routine? You know, 'Grognards be doin' it this way, and People that need to get off my lawn be doin' that way.'" Anyway, the specific thread/comment that had me thinking about this again is here- https://www.enworld.org/forum/showthread.php?659985-Why-are-we-okay-with-violence-in-RPGs/page18&p=7621612&viewfull=1#post7621612 And this is the excerpt: This shouldn't be terribly contentious. This is D&D after all. Y'know, back to the dungeon, the mega dungeon, dungeon crawling, that sort of thing? I mean, good grief, look at most modules published up until about 1982, which is a pile of them - they're pretty much nothing but hack fest dungeon crawls. (h/t Hussar ) So, I was thinking about this, and I thought that it was both accurate in some ways, but also ... well, it was also contentious. And the reason why boils down to what I would call the essential inscrutability of OD&D / AD&D / B/X . And since I have been ruminating over this for a while, I thought I would break out my thoughts on the issue, and why it's much harder to make general statements about how people played at that time than it is, say, to make statements regarding 5e. So, here goes! I'm sure this will go well ..... ;) 1. History of the World, Part I. "The Lord has given unto you these fifteen .... Oy, ten! TEN Commandments! For all to obey!" So, history is hard. And while some of us might discuss the release of the Efreeti-covered DMG at our local Waldenbooks like it was yesterday, others might reasonably point out that it happened 40 years ago. And a lot has changed in 40 years. It is easy to characterize and stereotype an era; when a blockbuster movie (like, say, Captain...

Thursday, 13th June, 2019

  • 05:31 AM - Hriston mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    I was speaking to the genesis of the tangent... but not sure how this changes what you said. What I said was in the context of Hussar’s question about dungeon dressing, which relates directly back to the OP by equating dungeon dressing with “the literary”, not the context of your tangent, which really does seem to miss the point because no one is saying the players are going to be interested in elements of dungeon dressing no matter how poorly they’re described.
  • 02:48 AM - Hriston mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Really?? Because I literally brought up this idea that how content was presented could in fact determine whether a group would be interested in the content earlier in the thread (and one of the reasons I thought of it as core to the game) and these were the replies... Emphasis mine. I don't know about @pemerton’s post, but that post of mine you quoted was not made in reply to you or anything you said. I made it in response to @Hussar’s post which directly preceded mine and which asked why dungeon dressing appears in most editions of the DMG.

Monday, 10th June, 2019

  • 12:41 AM - hawkeyefan mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ... I using evocative language for? Without evocative language my players wont be engaged with the situation or scenario. If pressed I jot down situation or scenario notes with what I call keywords and improvise description with said keywords. That’s understandable. I’m trying not to assume that there are only two views or that anyone is speaking for anyone else because I think that’s led to a lot of confusion throughout. Let me ask a question to pemerton, Hawkeye, Bedrockgames and Aldarc. Would you use the same words/language/etc. to describe a remote village in the mountains for say a Ravenloft campaign vs a Four color superhero game like Icons? let's assume good faith in that the Icons village isn't supposed to be haunted or anything tht would make it more Ravenloft-esque.... EDIT: Meant hawkeyefan ... That’s a good question. Honestly, I think it depends on the situation and what you’re trying to do. I think that some variation of word choice is certain, as Hussar and I have recently discussed. I think with any of those examples, I’d likely try to establish the tone early on. I think the genre or content will do a lot of the heavy lifting in that regard, but I’d likely try to describe things in a way that would reinforce the desired tone. But I think that would be very front-loaded for me. Probably at each level of the game....campaign level, and then again at the session or scene level. But I think that my goal as a GM is to convey the ideas as quickly and clearly as possible. I’m not going to spend 25 words to describe the monster approaching the party when “zombie” will do. So I want to get to that place where it all happens quickly and we proceed. I will be descriptive as needed, but I don’t really want to linger on narration once we’re past the scene-setting point.

Sunday, 9th June, 2019

  • 02:25 PM - pemerton mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...pper style)Popper has a (controversial) theory of what makes a claim, or perhaps a collection of claims, scientific. I'm not making a scientific claim. I'm making an aesthetic claim. So Popperian falsifiability has nothing to do with it. My claim is about the point of RPGing, what makes it a distinctive and worthwhile creative endeavour. Not far upthread Aldarc has given a pretty good account of my claim, so I'll add a few glosses to that. I am saying that entertainment in virtue of quality narration and performance is not what makes RPGing a distinctive and worthwhile creative endeavour. Rather, it's situation and resulting inhabitation and protagonism. I've said why I think this: because quality narration and performance are the weakest elements of the typical RPG experience (given the ready availability to most RPGers of genuinely quality narrations and performances), whereas protagonism in the context of engaging situation is the distinct thing that RPGs offer. When Hussar and Imaro say that they would quit games with ordinary-language descriptions because they'd find them too boring, my thought in response is that those games must have weak situations, or GMs who don't facilitiate protagonism. After all, both experience and reading lead me to think there's plenty of that going around. To elaborate on that last point: Hussar has tended to equate situation with content referring eg to boring content. But as I've indicated in and since the OP, good situation isn't about non-boring content. It's about the call to action, the invitation to protagonism. As far as I can tell those sorts of notions play little or no role in Hussar's conception of RPGing - if they do, he hasn't said anything about them in this thread as best I can recall. Lanefan, too, has quite recently posted that a GM should use language to make situation "more interesting", and has said that "situation is always going to be there no matter what". But this second claim isn't true if ...
  • 05:41 AM - pemerton mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    But I’m beginning to see why we’re all having a hard time coming to a consensus....it’s because we actually seem to have one, it’s just that what I see as pretty basic communication, you’re viewing as carefully wrought wordplay.I don't agree that there's a consensus: I can't really tell what Maxperson thinks, but Imaro and Hussar have made claims about the need for entertaining/evocative narration that I think clearly contradict the position I asserted in the OP. But one complicating fact pertains to vocabularly: eg I wouldn't regard cadaverous as a word to describe a Githyanki as especially remarkable or a-conversational, but Hussar probably would, and maybe Bedrockgames also. What counts as every day vocabularly among a group of RPGers is pretty highly variable and contingent on a range of factors (social background/status, educational levels, occupation, etc). I'm a humanities/social sciene academic (philosophy and law) and many of the people I talk to on a regular basis (ie the people I work with, my students, etc) are lilkewise, or are aspiring to be. So I think my every day vocaublary is probably richer than the New York Times. This is why I have brought it back to what are we aiming for? What counts as success, as good RPGing? What should a GM focus on? And I'm saying situation - framing, action...
  • 05:33 AM - pemerton mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    I’m sure mine and pemerton’s ideas don’t exactly match, no. But that’s fine. I don’t entirely agree with his premise, but I understand it, and I think he has a point. But I’m only speaking for myself. I would tend to think of "rictus grin" as falling on the literary side of things, as does Hussar. As I've posted, it does no harm if it doesn't impede (what I regard as) the real point of play. It has a face like a skull might do just as well. I personally can't remember how I've described githyanki in the past - I suspect I'm more likely to have shown a picture, such as the one on the front of the Fiend Folio. More generally, and feeding this into the current Maxperson - Ovinomancer interaction, I think that the role of description in RPGing is easily overestimated. It prioritises immersive imagination orver protagonistic inhabitation. Whereas the latter is the distinctive virtue of RPGs as games that are about producing a shared fiction. All this said, I think you've fully understood my points in this thread, seem to agree at least to some extent, and have made many helpful posts into it for which I thank you.

Saturday, 8th June, 2019

  • 09:29 PM - hawkeyefan mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    So is Alcatraz, but like your example it doesn't answer the question where they are. It could be an answer to how do you get to the elevator, though. For example, if I ask you where Los Angeles is, telling me to join the wagon train going west does not tell me where Los Angeles is. Telling me to get on that airplane over there does not tell me where Los Angeles is. I didn't ask you how to get there. I feel perhaps this is a bit pedantic. “Where are the elevators?” - “Follow these guys.” It answers the question. The extras. Describing the grin as rictus, the sword as shining in the near darkness. Holding a silvery greasword is enough. Yellow skin is enough. Adding in leathery is a nice extra touch. To me, this is a very low bar then, and I doubt it’s what was in mind with the OP. I feel like including a few adjectives isn’t what we’re talking about. That’s why I asked Hussar for an example of what he had in mind after providing my some of my own.

Thursday, 6th June, 2019

  • 01:36 PM - Sadras mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    I think that you underestimate, if not vastly exaggerate, the problem of communicating the basic ideas of the game. And we usually have a basic awareness of some cognitive contexts that our gaming group will likely have experienced. I could perhaps agree with you that there is some exaggeration from the other side, but I also feel you vastly reduce the importance of the language used within RPGs. @Hussar touched on this upthread, but I feel it requires to be reiterated - we have literally volumes of D&D supplements, magazines, books and fan-created material on settings, monsters, characters and the like. All that literal endeavour is not just to communicate the context and stakes in which their actions take place. Fluff is important for many gamers. I also agree with @Imaro in that if the DM is using conversational language to the point you seem to indicate in these posts (which I'm pretty sure you do not), I would quickly excuse myself from that table. As an aside, I have even used/stolen lines from fantasy novels, whether it be cool dialogue or an evocative description of something/someone, for my RP games. Words matter. I keep my 2e-4e MM not just for the mechanics, but also for the fluff. EDIT: Evocative words help fuel the players' imagination / immersive experience.
  • 10:13 AM - Aldarc mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Or, Hussar, you can just tell players what the monster or thing is. It's not like evocative language is required for saying "Oh, Thor? You know that he is the god of storms in this land." Or "a githyanki is a race that lives in the astral sea that looks like this [shows picture]." If players want more detail, they can ask and initiate a conversation. I don't know why you present this as either evocative language or nothing.

Wednesday, 5th June, 2019

  • 02:57 PM - pemerton mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...finished speaking) a passive audience member to whatever I am narrating.I don't think this is true. I don't intend what follows to be triggering for anyone, and apologise if it is - I couldn't come up with a completely safe example. But, that said, and continuing on: If I relate to you the information that a bomb is about to go off in your building, I don't think you would be a passive audience. I think you would engage with what I'm saying in many quite active ways. Including, perhaps, certain sorts of interruptions, but not limited to those. EDIT: I think this post from Campbell, not far upthread, presents an idea of players as something different from a passive audience: What is fundamental to me is that we are all involved in the process as creative peers and everyone's contributions are valued equally. Also that everyone is expected to contribute. Also that contributions move play forward and demand action from other players (GM included). Conversely, a way upthread Hussar talked about a GM "rolling up the plot wagon". To me at least, that suggests a situation in which the players are something of a passive audience.
  • 10:03 AM - Sadras mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Hussar's post reminded me of another thread many of us engaged in, I'm a little lazy now to go searching for a link but it was the thread about the blocked texts in published modules. It would be interesting to see which of us valued the blocked texts (even as a starting point) with those of us which strongly lean on wordcrafting being of significant importance in RPGing.

Tuesday, 4th June, 2019

  • 10:01 PM - Imaro mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...red eating pepperoni. That said, I am certain that if anyone who preferred pepperoni salami pizza genuinely believed that they were being unfairly excluded from a group ordering a cheese pizza when there are people with vegetarian, halal, or kosher diets present, then that person is probably a rude, self-centered dick who should be excluded though for reasons other than their pizza preferences. LMAO... you're really equating preference of little to no wordcraft with having life threatening allergies, religious belief systems and so on... this is really getting absurd... and I'm the one creating fallacies?? Here is what you said: Now, here is what pemerton actually wrote: His position was NOT that you can have narrative without wordcraft or that wordcraft isn't necessary, but that "the literary quality of that narration is [not] important." And I said as much when I summarized his OP. See and this is where it gets silly because "quality" as used here is never defined. Again as @Hussar said earlier if we are talking Shakespearean prose then we're all in agreement... but then it begs the question why start a thread about something so obvious and well uninteresting? What's the point if this is what you meant and why not just state it as such without all the back and forth. EDIT: On another note can anyone link a definition of literary quality that is objectively measurable, from a reputable source and widely accepted?

Wednesday, 29th May, 2019

  • 01:39 AM - pemerton mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...gement of the situation on the part of the PCs, that at its heart the issue is not performance but framing situations that invite protagonism.What darkbard says is correct, with one caveat that perhaps gets closer to the heart of Sadras's concern: I think that the invitation to action often requires spontaneity or real-time judgement in tthe back-and-forth; whereas wordcraft tends to benefit from reflection and editing. So I think there can be a degree of tension between the two. So there is a second claim, on top of the claim that literary quality is not core to RPGing. It is that, while everything else being equal literary quality (and the resulting entertainment) can be a good thing, everything else may often not be equal. I have tried to highlight the history of why this thread was created.And as I've already pointed out, you're wrong about this. As the OP says, it was prompted by multiple threads. Not just the boxed text thread; also the action declaration thread, in which Hussar was criticising some other posters for insisting on "talky talky" as key to action declaration, and they were trying to articulate a contrast between effective description for RPGing purposes and what I would call descriptions having literary merit. Hussar was sceptical of that distinction being drawn in that thread, so it doesn't surprise me too much that he's sceptical of such distinctions being drawin in this thread. What has surprised me, though, is that in that thread Hussar was against such descriptions and in favour of "I roll a climb check: 16", whereas in this thread he wants the players to bring the evocative descriptions. I'm not saying that Hussar is inconsistent, just that he's drawing his boundaries of desirability in a different place from what I had anticipated.

Tuesday, 28th May, 2019

  • 03:57 PM - lowkey13 mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    You are correct that @lowkey13 keeps asserting this. But you are both wrong in your characterization of @pemerton's position. Many times now he has articulated that all things being equal, literary presentation can improve the quality of a game, but that caveat requires that the core activity of TRPGing be not in the presentation itself but in the invitation to meaningful engagement of the situation on the part of the PCs, that at its heart the issue is not performance but framing situations that invite protagonism. I'm sure pemerton will correct me if I have inadvertendly mischaracterized his position. I would love to agree with you, but I have tried to highlight the history of why this thread was created. Then I left for a while, and I see that we are not only no closer to a resolution, but that when @Hussar tried to reach common ground with @pemerton, such attempt was rejected. So ... yeah, it is what it is. Personally, I don't care how permerton plays, or how you play, or how people want to define (and re-define) terms in order to keep this argument going ... But I'm just pointing out that this thread was created to advance an argument, wait ... let me quote again ... about where the aesthetic merit and aeshetic power of RPGIng lies, and therefore a view about what the point of RPGing ultimately is. To the extent someone is telling me what the REAL POINT of RPGing is ... well, they can pound sand. And I would expect them to say the same to me if I told them they were playing it wrong, because I knew "what the point of RPGing ultimately is."(tm). EDIT- And if you look back, you will see that way back when, I said that I have said that repeatedly- here: But to make this clear, again: Your opinions are fine. I think that you {the OP} often have a habit of universalizing your expe...
  • 12:02 PM - Sadras mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    It seems like they are narrative endeavors or storytelling endeavors. I don't necessarily think that the word "literary" applies when we are talking more about story-craft or fiction-craft than the crafting of literature, even if we apply the technical sense of pertaining to written words. Ok you are making a distinction between story/narrative and literary. As a layman, I have to ask, is the crafting of a good story not part of crafting great literature? What are the differences? I can also understand @Hussar's frustration. See below. I thought it might be a discussion about whether or not wordcraft is a principal or essential means of evoking emotional responses in a RPG. The point of my OP is to deny such a claim. On the other hand, I believe that @Hussar affirms such a claim, as does @Imaro. I'm frankly not sure what @Maxperson thinks about it. @Aldarc, the bolded section (emphasis mine) could be utilised in any of the crafts you mentioned above. @pemerton here IS equating wordcraft with literary endeavours as he refers back to his OP, thereby introducing a new term and opening up the door to more rebuttle and confusion (hence the accusation of goal post shifts). For me wordcraft is important when attempting to convey certain images and framing particular scenarios to players to evoke certain emotions as reflected on my post using CR/Mercer as an example. The result being wordcrafting is important in RPGs, therefore literary endeavours are important to RPGs.
  • 05:43 AM - pemerton mentioned Hussar in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    So let's focus on what the actual lines of dispute are, rather than fight endlessly over the definition of literary.Yeah, I didn't expect this thread to be a debate about the meaning and scope of the term "literary". I thought it might be a discussion about whether or not wordcraft is a principal or essential means of evoking emotional responses in a RPG. The point of my OP is to deny such a claim. On the other hand, I believe that Hussar affirms such a claim, as does Imaro. I'm frankly not sure what Maxperson thinks about it. Everyone agrees with you @pemerton.This isn't true at all. Unless you've changed your mind, upthread you asserted that the use of wordcraft and associated performance is a key means of promoting emotional responses in RPGing. Which is what I am disagreeing with. ************************ On the issue of "playstyle arguments/agendas", which has been flagged by Bedrockgames and darkbard: I think (and hope) it's obvious that my OP is putting forward a view about where the aesthetic merit and aeshetic power of RPGIng lies, and therefore a view about what the point of RPGing ultimately is. I recognise that others will disagree. That's not uncommon in critical discussions. I'm not 100% sure that I agree with Eagleton that these "deep structures" of aesthetic evaluation correlate to, or express, social power relations and any resultant ideologies. That's a further, and harder, question. Bu...


Page 1 of 55 123456789101151 ... LastLast
No results to display...

Thursday, 27th June, 2019

  • 02:01 AM - Beleriphon quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Well, kinda sorta. Look at that description of the Dursley's above. That's adopting a very specific "voice". It's a sing songy story telling voice because the story is written for 10 year olds. It is a very deliberate choice. Your choice of a conversational tone is deliberate since you don't like a more prose style pattern. But, make no mistake, you are still narrating the scene. There's no way to play an RPG without someone narrating the scene. Whether it's "rubbish is scattered around what was once a fine guest bedroom" or "it's a run-down bedroom with rubbish scattered about.", those are deliberate choices and both of those choices are setting the scene for the players. The range isn't narrative vs conversational, it's prose vs conversational. An important distinction I think. That reminds me, I need to do a session entirely in rhyming iambic pentameter. Or nothing but limericks. Or sonnets. Yeah, that's the ticket. It amuses me use prose to describe narratives when...

Wednesday, 26th June, 2019

  • 03:26 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    H basically sounds like a scene to me. As soon as you decide which of those options to go with, you have a scene. That you like a looser structure is perfectly fine. I'm bad at improv, so, I need my notes as a nice warm and fuzzy security blanket. :D But, sure, I can certainly see how this works. For me it boils down to a few things: I like to be surprised as the GM I don't like having the feeling that instead of running a session, I could just hand my players my notes and largely get the same result I was very, very unhappy running sessions in the 3E era under the predominant adventure structure (the style of adventure built around Encoutner Levels and planned out storylines, and the stuff you found in Dungeon at the time). This got worse the more things like wish lists and builds crept into the game, where it felt like it was all about reaching some pre-ordained destination. So I went back to the early stuff: the 1E DMG, my old Ravenloft books, stuff I'd heard about and played...
  • 01:44 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Hrm. Not sure how much I can add to this to be honest. I'm seeing where folks are coming from and I keep nodding my head as I'm reading. Frankly, thought, and perhaps this is just my own biases, something like this: basically sounds like a scene to me. As soon as you decide which of those options to go with, you have a scene. That you like a looser structure is perfectly fine. I'm bad at improv, so, I need my notes as a nice warm and fuzzy security blanket. :D But, sure, I can certainly see how this works. It's still narration though. :p :D We are never going to agree on this Hussar. Yes you can call it a scene. But you can also call it an encounter, a situation, a challenge, etc. I find these much more neutral than scene (which brings to mind scene from a movie or play—-which I don’t want to emulate structurally). Same with narration. We are just at the “yes it is”, “no it isn’t” phase of the discussion.
  • 03:35 AM - Manbearcat quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Umm. Aren’t location and scene synonyms? As in “place where stuff happens “? What’s the difference? Let me start with: "I don't have much interest, if any at all, in this conversation...so I'm not particularly interested in getting drawn back in." However, I think I have some virtual ink to spill on the internet on this one. For my money, the two have significant differences in TTRPGs. In TTRPGs, I associate "scene" with "a discrete unit of play, whereby situational framing > decision-point > action resolution > reframing occurs in a loop until a codified win/loss condition is met, upon which time whatever was at stake is earned/denied/complicated (depending upon system)." The term "scene" is as much game tech as it is art when it comes to TTRPGs. I don't think of Apocalypse World or Dungeon World as scene-driven games. All of D&D combat is "scene-based." 5e D&D play that deploys the Social Interaction mechanics should be scene-based. I think of all of D&D 4e, Cortex+, Mouse Guard...
  • 02:27 AM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Umm. Aren’t location and scene synonyms? As in “place where stuff happens “? What’s the difference? See Celebrim's post for the distinction. But I prefer location because it doesn't carry the double meaning. Yes a scene can mean a location (i.e. it was a beautiful scene, the bay down by Red Rock). But it can also mean a sequence of action in a movie or book....and that is where I think the term can become a problem if you are not as interested in emulating literature or film (or even if you but are not interested in certain structural aspects). So I prefer location, because it means a place, but can't be equivocated on to bring oughts into the discussion as easily.
  • 12:55 AM - Celebrim quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Umm. Aren’t location and scene synonyms? As in “place where stuff happens “? What’s the difference? Ahh, yes. The problem with trying to conduct a conversation in English is that even though we have like 60,000 words, most of the common ones have several different meanings - sometimes not even that closely related to each other. In this case, definition two "a sequence of continuous action in a play, movie, opera, or book" is closer to the meaning that I've been going for. A scene is definitely tied to place, but both continuity and that stuff that happens is important as well. A location where nothing happens is not a scene, and the location might not change but you can have several different scenes in it. For an example of the later in an RPG, if you've played or are familiar with the 'Call of Cthulhu' adventure 'Edge of Darkness' the last four scenes in the adventure all happen in a single very small location. But they are separate scenes because they are not continuous ...

Tuesday, 25th June, 2019

  • 11:24 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    But as soon as the player tells you his intentions to go to the casino you know what the next scene is. It’s already established- go to the casino to confront Iron God Their intentions could change or adjust adjust at any point. I don’t know how they will react as they see more details and observe things on their approach. How would the players even think to find a tailor? They have stated what they want to do. Do your players routinely change direction before the even start? i used that as an example because my players try stuff like that all the time. It isn’t a stretch to ask if there is a tailor in the marketplace. And yes they do routinely shift gears if someone suggests a better plan on the way (this happens frequently) But, in any event you have a scene - the casino. Whether you do a canned description or expect the players to ask questions is simply a difference in preference not substance. At the end of the day you still describe ie narrate, the scene. A casino is a loc...
  • 09:41 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    So, no, @Bedrockgames, it's not about any sort of semantic trap to show that you aren't playing the way you are. It's that you are playing more or less the same as everyone else, but, you want to call it something different and that's what's confusing the issue. Again, how we think of what we are doing at the table matters. Thinking that it is a scene carries all kinds of implications that I believe influences GM adjudication. I know this, because when I think of it as a scene, I run the game differently. Also, it is a confusing term because while you might mean scene to refer to 'stuff that happens' and you might mean 'narration' to refer to 'what the GM says to describe things'. For many people, a lot in fact, the former refers to a pre-planned moment with expected beats and actions (i.e. this is going to be the scene where they confront the BIG BAD). Personally I think narration also is a confusing term, particularly when it is paired with scene in the way you were doing. Again, it sugge...
  • 09:37 PM - Celebrim quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    But, see, at least three other people - dragoner, Michael Silverbane and myself WOULD describe this as bog standard narration and a scene. The fact that you happen to be using an idiosyncratic definition of the word seems to be the major sticking point here. It's amazing how many arguments depend on different understandings of what a word or phrase mean. Without knowing how exactly Bedrockgames defines narration or scene, I don't really know what his objection is in this case. But as best as I can tell Bedrockgames has right from the beginning of the thread tried to distinguish Narration from Conversation, and made it clear in his original post that for the purposes of the thread he was using both as terms of art. Quote: "This comes from a topic in another thread where GM description came up. Some posters saw the GM's role as that of narrator, preferring a style of description that felt like prose from a novel, others preferred a more conversational approach. The first approach wa...
  • 09:35 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Had you actually posted something like this a long time ago, when asked repeatedly to do so, would have saved a LOT of time. . I posted links to recordings and a youtube video. I was reluctant to post an example by text because I think it ran the risk of being very artificial (and for what it is worth I agree with Celebrim that it is artificial). I don't think it is very useful for discussion for that reason. But I just wanted to put out SOMETHING so you might have an idea of where I am coming from.
  • 09:33 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    But, see, at least three other people - @dragoner, @Michael Silverbane and myself WOULD describe this as bog standard narration and a scene. The fact that you happen to be using an idiosyncratic definition of the word seems to be the major sticking point here. . Well if three whole people on the internet say something, I guess I have to re-evaluate my whole worldview and what words I use how. I don't think I am using an idiosyncratic definition at all. And I've explained part of why I am so particular is because of issues around equivocation. But more important. Thinking of games in the terms you are insisting on makes play less enjoyable for me. What is more important, someone's argument on the internet, or what I see at my table in real life?
  • 02:46 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Since when does boxed text have anything to do with event resolution? Every single example that's been put forward is about setting up the event, but, nothing about what happens next. I presume that your players don't talk over you while you describe the NPC? Would you not also describe the surroundings? Where are the doors, what's the furniture, that sort of thing? Again, that's all narration is. Like I said, I think you should listen to my session if you want to see how I do things. Me providing an artificial example is, like Aldarc points out, not likely to be a good reflection of real play. But let me give an example of how a session might play out a bit: ME: You get inside the city of Tung-On and the street you are on is filled with merchants and shop stalls PLAYER A: Can we see the Lucky Mountain Gambling Hall nearby? ME: Yes, it is just down the street, across from a bunch of inns PLAYER B: I lead the way to the gambling hall ME: When you get to the door there are men in bl...
  • 02:26 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    ...hat arise, to feel like pre-packaged or canned things I had waiting. Boxed text and prepared narration feel like this to me. Thinking of the situation as a scene, also feels like this to me. If you want to know where I am coming from, look more toward examples like Feast of Goblyns or 1000 Bushels of Rye (sans evocative literary-like descriptions in the case of FOG). I don't want artificiality in my games. I don't want my games modeled after stuff like Pathfinder or 5E modules. I really can't stand that stuff. Nor do I want to sound like Matt Mercer. I just want a casual play experience where the players feel like they are not beholden to stuff I've pre-ordained or prepped in advance. I like active and reactive NPCs who pursue their own goals and respond organically to the players. That isn't easy to do if you are pre-occupied with set-pieces, key scenes, or describing things like you are writing a novel. At least not for me. One thing I find very frustrating about this conversation Hussar, is I totally believe in the experience you say you have at the table, thinking of the game in terms of scenic narration. I don't understand why you find it so difficult to understand that I think of the games in different terms and why you find it so hard to accept a person might not think of the game in terms of scenes and narration. Again, these are analogies for understanding. And they are terms with broad and specific meanings very open to equivocation.
  • 02:19 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    @Bedrockgames - you didn't answer my question. The PC's encounter an NPC that they have never met before. The reason isn't all that important, although that will obviously come up a bit later when resolving the situation. But, how do you convey information about the NPC to the players without any narration? What does that even look like? . I did answer your question. I said I describe the NPC, and emphasized that your question is misleading because it equates description with narrating a scene. I don't know where you are getting this idea that I don't describe things. I've stated over and over that descriptions happen. I've linked to my own sessions as examples. The information is there if you want to know what one of my games sounds like.
  • 01:31 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    It's kinda like metagaming. It's impossible to play an RPG without it. A certain amount of meta gaming is inevitable but there is a big difference between that minimal level where people keep it in check and a game filled with meta gaming. Again this brings us back to the very bad argument of ‘X is inevitable/all encompassing/etc so you can’t escape my playstyle.’
  • 12:53 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Ok, umm, how does this work? You have an NPC that the players have never seen before in a place that they have never been before. Now, how do you explain the scene (ie narrate) to the players without actually describing the scene, describing the NPC or anything like that? But, to be fair, if that's the definition of narration that you're working from - that players are passive listeners to an event - then, sure, fair enough, I don't do that either. Just realize that the definition of narrating a scene in no way actually implies or explicitly says that there is any passive listening going on at all. That probably the reason that so many people are pushing back against you is that you are working from a definition that no one else is. First, Description does not Equal Narrating Scene. A scene is a specific concept from other types of media. I think in this instance it is best thought of as an analogy. If you want to analogize to scenes, go ahead. But I find it very much gets in the way ...
  • 12:21 PM - Aldarc quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Just realize that the definition of narrating a scene in no way actually implies or explicitly says that there is any passive listening going on at all. That probably the reason that so many people are pushing back against you is that you are working from a definition that no one else is.I don't think Bedrockgames is mistaken here. This sense of literary prose narration happening at you, with the players in more passive roles as an audience to GM performance, was present as far back as the OP of pemerton's thread that spawned this one. He is working from a definition or understanding that others had been using.
  • 10:34 AM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    The point is, you have to introduce that NPC bully. Which means you have to narrate the scene where that bully appears. The point is, you still have to narrate. It's kinda like metagaming. It's impossible to play an RPG without it. Again these are different things. Narrating a scene and introducing a character, are not the same. Narrating a scene implies the players are passive listeners to an event. That isn't what I am doing. This is a case where how talk about what we are doing, and how we think of the game (in terms of analogies like 'scenes') really does matter.
  • 12:22 AM - Bedrockgames quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Umm, where did the situation come from? Who initiated the situation? Who set the location, the opponents (or allies or whatever is being reacted to)? . Even if it is all me, which it usually isn't, there is a very big difference in my mind between a scene and a situation. A scene to me suggests I have something I want to present to the group, as well as a strong sense of where it should go. A situation is something where I the GM can be just as surprised as the players by where things go. Generally the starting point of the campaign, obviously I as the GM have a strong hand in establishing (this is the system, this is the setting, etc). But the players make their characters and connect them to the setting. And once their feet hit the ground, they do what they want, which helps develop and prompt new situations. It isn't just about opening doors. It is about what the players are trying to do. I can introduce a local bully if i want, but the situation develops very differently if the play...
  • 12:19 AM - pemerton quoted Hussar in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    The range isn't narrative vs conversational, it's prose vs conversational. An important distinction I think. I'd be tempted to describe it in terms of formal vs informal style. Ultimately, that's really a cosmetic difference, not one in essence. Whether formal or informal, it's narration if you're laying it out for your players. Like billd91 said, the distinction is formal vs informal style. But, you're still narrating no matter what you do. There is also, of course the fact that prose is typically used to mean plain or natural writing, as opposed to poetic writing. Except here, of course, where it is being used to mean something along the lines of, "of literary worth" and "something that non-nerds would not use."I'm not too fussed what terms are used to draw the distinction that's at issue in this thread. I've been trying to follow the usage that seems to have been established. Hussar told me to use prose vs conversational, so I did. If I'm now meant to use formal vs informal, that's fine. Whatever terminology is used, I think there is a reasonably clear contrast between (i) the Saltmarsh text, which describes a room by leading with a main clause that refers to rubbish and uses the phrase "there is evidence of rodent infestation", and (ii) a less formal/more conversational description, which uses the main clause to present the main information, and talks directly about seeing rats or mouse droppings.


Hussar's Downloads

  Filename Total Downloads Rating Files Uploaded Last Updated

Most Recent Favorite Generators/Tables

View All Favorites