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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 10th June, 2019, 01:49 AM
    Well, no. So your point is you found a case where the same expected damage per round favours someone with a larger base damage but fewer attacks? OK, sure. If PC2 hits for N hp and PC1 hits for 2N hp, then critters with N + (1 - N-1) hp will fall more quickly to PC1. Since the case resolves down to critters have 2 hits to kill, PC1 inflicts a one hit per blow with 2 chances to hit and PC1...
    135 replies | 3922 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 9th June, 2019, 11:46 PM
    You're right. I was looking at it as a variation of Lancaster's Law, but you've set the situation up as a worst case comparison for PC2. PC2 has to perform just as much overkill as PC1 to drop a enemy, but suffers from reduced chance to inflict that whole amount in a single round. Change your scenario by dropping the enemy's hp total to 4 and you'll see a large swing since that's the best...
    135 replies | 3922 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 9th June, 2019, 09:32 PM
    Overkill control is pointless against a single enemy. The goal in that case is at-least-enough kill. Overkill control becomes valuable when dealing with multiple enemies.
    135 replies | 3922 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Wednesday, 5th June, 2019, 10:55 PM
    I'm a peasant. I have no title. That differences exist between systems is objective. Determining whether a system is functional is subjective but not necessarily biased. Deciding one functional system is better than another is subjective and necessarily biased.
    99 replies | 3923 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th June, 2019, 11:51 PM
    No functional system is "better" than any other, merely different and I seek them out because of those differences. Each of the games listed is "better" for me in its niche than any other I've examined. All the games listed offer solid functional rule sets that I have turned to several times in the past and are on my go-to list for future consideration. Mystic Masters is one of the "little...
    99 replies | 3923 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th June, 2019, 11:19 PM
    Pretty much I play lots of different RPGs. I've run multi-year campaigns in over a dozen* very different systems from Aftermath through Uni-system. I choose a system that matches the gameplay (genre/power level/game play expectation)I want for a particular campaign. 4e wandered far enough from my D&D expectation to be a poor match and didn't provide enough of a unique/superior game play to...
    99 replies | 3923 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 31st May, 2019, 09:05 PM
    A very long time ago I wrote a tourney for Champions. I was a floor resource for the GMs running and had to correct a couple a few times because they didn't know the basic rules of the game they were trying to run. I mean really basic stuff like how the combat turn functions or Entangle powers don't inflict damage type stuff. Guys running really need to understand the basics.
    50 replies | 1635 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 31st May, 2019, 05:15 PM
    It quite important to me that the GM knows the rules. The rules act as a shared expectation for how the game world works, what my PC should expect to be able to accomplish and the basic difficulty of actions in the universe. If I base my actions on those expectations and the GM uses a different set to adjudicate, I'm essentially throwing darts while blindfolded. I don't mind a GM that needs...
    50 replies | 1635 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Thursday, 30th May, 2019, 12:30 PM
    It's a niche, but not one I'm sure has a lot of audience. Most DMs who buy/use other people's adventures want to because it cuts down on their workload rather than because they aren't inspired to create a campaign arc. A skeleton removes the arc, but still mostly full design time for each adventure construction -- maps, encounters, stat blocks, etc.
    8 replies | 391 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 11:10 PM
    0.8 beta. The title page says 0.7, but the update notes say 0.8.
    12 replies | 448 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 10:37 PM
    And this would be why you're a publisher and I'm not!
    12 replies | 448 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 10:34 PM
    Heh. Since the writer put everything except artwork into open game document, I theoretically create a new document, cut and paste this one's text in its entirety and update section 6 to include the original. Too much work.
    12 replies | 448 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 10:25 PM
    Right-o. What I can do though is provide fair-use snippets. There isn't a great one-to-one match between these advanced classes presented and the original 3.5 classes. For example, the Wizard Advanced class get about 1/3 BAB (+3 @10th level). Spell casting and magic item creation are handled by a bunch of class feats. It looks like you could probably get into Wizard after about level 3...
    12 replies | 448 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 10:04 PM
    I found a copy on an old backup. It's an OGL supplement. Is it OK to upload here Morrus?
    12 replies | 448 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 01:13 PM
    G'day Folks, I know this is a long shot, but I recall reading an online short comic / graphic story years ago. It follows a single guy as he struggles with the philosophical concept that interruptions of consciousness are tantamount to death: every time he sleeps he "dies" and when he wakes someone new is born who simply has a slightly different perspective. The story follows him over a...
    0 replies | 164 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 26th May, 2019, 11:12 PM
    I peg it at about 1/10.000 people are desperate/insane enough to pursue a career in adventuring. About 1/1,000 or so try it, but the initial culling is significant and many either die or move on to more sedate activities.
    94 replies | 4376 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 26th May, 2019, 11:09 PM
    Nagol replied to Ye Come Back Inn
    The Welcome Inn isn't referenced. The three names in the module are the Comeback Inn, the Prison Out of Time, and the Inn between Worlds. It's a fairly common set of tropes. Even Elric had a an equivalent with the Vanishing Tower. So the Welcome Inn and skiip's version of the Comeback Inn are probably separate instances.
    12 replies | 589 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 26th May, 2019, 11:33 AM
    Nagol replied to Ye Come Back Inn
    Adventures in Blackmoor is D&D Expert module DA1 (Dave Arneson 1) and is set in Mystara / Arneson's Blackmoor (assigned as Mystara 3,000 years ago) as opposed to Greyhawk's homage location. The mostly indestructible inn contains both a temporal and dimensional gate though the PCs only experience the temporal aspect first hand, dangerous planar critters leak through demonstrating the other. The...
    12 replies | 589 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 26th May, 2019, 02:52 AM
    Nagol replied to Ye Come Back Inn
    That sounds like a variation of the inn in the adventure. The first incarnation the PCs run into can't be exited. The last incarnation has employees that can let guests out, but no ransom is demanded.
    12 replies | 589 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Nagol's Avatar
    Saturday, 25th May, 2019, 10:01 PM
    Nagol replied to Ye Come Back Inn
    Adventures in Blackmoor features the Comeback Inn; an inn that ends up crossing dimensions and time through a series of adventures.
    12 replies | 589 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 24th May, 2019, 06:03 PM
    Did you do into those thread from the main page? They present differently as news items than they do as forum threads. Try finding the same discussions through the forum.
    5 replies | 219 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 24th May, 2019, 05:52 PM
    It's not subscription only. Look down at the "Reply to Thread" button. Look at the small text immediately above it. There should be 3 items: Give xp for this post, Laugh with this post, and a small triangle for reporting bad (spam, personal attack, what have you) posts
    5 replies | 219 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Friday, 24th May, 2019, 11:19 AM
    A current show that posits nearly infinite life, body hopping, true AI, and the effect on society is Altered Carbon.
    12 replies | 499 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Nagol's Avatar
    Thursday, 23rd May, 2019, 10:09 PM
    The start is chosen to complement each campaign, but the most common starting point is as some form of newly arrived visitors. It makes it simpler for both the players and me.
    18 replies | 574 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Thursday, 23rd May, 2019, 10:02 PM
    Most game systems don't get as far as a single session. A few get played extensively because the mechanics do the job better than any other I've tried with the same game conceits. There are a few I can recall running/playing a single session of: Vampire the Masquerade: the system did not support the presented play expectations. I didn't want to keep applying force as the GM to make the...
    59 replies | 3686 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Nagol's Avatar
    Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019, 12:17 PM
    I can see both advantage and disadvantages to my suggestion, but perhaps putting up one of those yellow alert everyone gets may be appropriate to both warn people about the problem and the repercussions of abusing it?
    33 replies | 754 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019, 12:13 PM
    If you edit before it is read by someone else, no notification appears.
    33 replies | 754 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019, 02:19 AM
    Sure! Probably several have. A bunch never came back and are assumed dead. Some were somewhat successful and retired; inn and tavern ownership is a common retirement option. Others found a 'real job' that doesn't require constant violence under threat of death or worse for lottery-style paydays. Maybe a couple were successful enough to leave the area with their gains. Like I wrote, the...
    104 replies | 3010 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 21st May, 2019, 10:04 PM
    I've had players who ended up not being protagonists because they refused to do anything adventurous or tried and were wiped out before accomplishing anything. Neither leads to a strong campaign. There are other adventurers, but generally not very many who are able/willing to respond where the PCs start. Most people have better things to do with their time. Adventuring (especially early...
    104 replies | 3010 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 21st May, 2019, 09:34 PM
    Well, yeah there's loads of people with good stats. About 1 person in 40 has an 18 in a stat. Most don't use them in heroic manner. That's why they're not protagonists.
    104 replies | 3010 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Nagol's Avatar
    Tuesday, 21st May, 2019, 08:34 PM
    Your premise depends strongly on how special the PCs are. Most campaigns of D&D I run, the PCs start off just like their neighbours. Heroism comes from choosing to act not nature and all that rot.
    104 replies | 3010 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 20th May, 2019, 07:59 PM
    Thanks! That's matches my impressions of the trailer, more's the pity.
    33 replies | 919 view(s)
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  • Nagol's Avatar
    Monday, 20th May, 2019, 03:38 PM
    I really liked the first. I really didn't like the second. I thought the world became nonsensical and dumb. Any chance I'd like the 3rd?
    33 replies | 919 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Nagol's Avatar
    Sunday, 19th May, 2019, 04:02 PM
    Sure it does! The two premises taken together aren't mutually exclusive. The first informs the players that they need not concern themselves with the slaughter of orcs -- even non-combatants. Game play is not expected to pursue those moral underpinnings. The second says player choice is not restricted by the first decision. The value I see is those atmospheres, themes, and pursuits...
    104 replies | 3010 view(s)
    3 XP
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Sunday, 26th May, 2019

  • 10:54 AM - Lanefan mentioned Nagol in post Ye Come Back Inn
    This is really weird - just earlier tonight at our game session I was telling people about the Comeback Inn and also couldn't remember where I'd seen it. Another player talked about the Welcome Inn, which he and I both kind of remembered being in the Blackmoor part of Oerth (same world as Greyhawk's on) and as being a planar nexus of some kind; that might be what Nagol is referring to.

Monday, 22nd April, 2019

  • 03:39 AM - Immortal Sun mentioned Nagol in post Playing With Collectively "Owned" Characters
    I agree with Nagol that characters who haven't gotten a post in X sessions becomes "public property". I think your initial idea might work if the players all bought into it to begin with, but I'd have some set guidelines for every character that the players have to agree to play by, that way you don't end up with characters with constantly flipping personalities.

Saturday, 6th April, 2019

  • 02:55 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post How to deal with death in RPG?
    The root is not generally about pacing.I didn't suggest any general root. It made a suggestion about a particular issue in a particular context. Nagol provided more information in response (fleshing out the meaning of "slowly") which corrected my misapprehension. The root is that GMs can, with effort, come up with some really cool stuff, but sometimes players don't engage with that stuff, or they choose to disengage once they have already bought in. <snip> You might say, "Well, I never use elements in my games that I can't prep rather quickly, so this is not an issue for me."I would, and did, say that - like S'mon - I don't have disappointing sessions. Some posters appeared to be sceptical of this. I'm not sure what you have in mind by "really cool stuff"; and I'm not sure what your threshold is for disappointment. Just having a look through my 4e prep folder on my computer, there are 60-odd files. There seem to be about 4 that (as best I recall) I never got to use: a fey forest encounter, a haunted fey swamp encounter, an aboleth encounter and an epic-tier shadowdark encounter. Each of these might be an hour or more of...

Friday, 5th April, 2019

  • 11:36 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post How to deal with death in RPG?
    To the extent that Nagol's Ars Magica example is meant to be a negative example, the issue would seem to be one of pacing. WIth the Champions example, again to the extent that it is meant to be a negative example, the issue would seem to be that the one player was able to make a choice that resolved the stakes for the other players. I think that can be a big issue, especially in systems that assume group play and so group win/loss.

Monday, 10th December, 2018

  • 04:51 AM - Lanefan mentioned Nagol in post Echohawk's Collector's Guides Broken?
    Lanefan, if you're still around, do me the favour of trying the matching link in my post #16 (it's the 2nd link)? Nagol - there are three links in post 16. The first and third ones work fine for me. The second, or middle one, gives me the same error I noted above.

Wednesday, 24th October, 2018

  • 02:04 PM - Blue mentioned Nagol in post Deleted Posts
  • 01:37 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    ...by improving in class ability. I think the answer to your "captain as henchman" question is trivially obvious, but at the moment I'll leave it as something for the interested reader to resolve. A more interesting question is whether a PC or henchman fighter enjoys the command abilities of a NPC captain if appointed to such a role. The rules don't tell us. I would suggest that they do, but that's an extrapolation from the rules, not an interpretation of them. It's a white room scenario pemerton. Knocking out the 20 goblins killing the townsfolk does nothing as the will just get back up and kill more. What is the party going to do? Leave them out in the middle of the forest to wake back up? It's not feasible to carry them to town. Carrying them to town will just result in the town killing them anyway, which will introduce the fighter to meting out death indirectly.I gave an actual play example upthread (from a different system, but no different in principle in this respect). Nagol gave an example. I can't remember the colours of the walls where I was playing, and don't know about Nagol's case, but white paint or not these are reports of actual play. As far as the goblins are concerned: (i) why is it not feasible to take them to town? (ii) where do the rules say that they will be killed in the town? (iii) handing someone over to someone else who then murders them typically is not a case of meting out death? (iv) why can't the PCs take an oath from the goblins to renounce their evil ways (thats what the PCs in my 4e game did on more than one occasion)? You seem to have an incredibly narrow conception of what is possible - presumably you think most of the above is house ruling, but I don't know where in the rulebooks you're taking your narrow conception from. In the game the PC has already hit and killed the opponent. Then, AFTER the player has found out that fact, the player can suddenly have the PC time travel back to before damage was rolled and decid...

Tuesday, 16th October, 2018

  • 11:28 PM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    To be perfectly honest, it didn’t really occur to me that this would be contentious.That surprises me! Although there are a wide variety of approaches expressed on ENworld (I'll point to eg Aldarc, TwoSix, Nagol in this thread), there is a default or dominant approach which is that RPGing = the GM establishes a fiction (which typically will take the form of some sort of "story") and the players' role is to work their way through that fiction. Hence any suggestion that players should exercise some control over establishing the fiction will be contentiouos.

Saturday, 13th October, 2018

  • 02:18 AM - Hussar mentioned Nagol in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    ...s the PC to be effectively "hands off" the element as well. So Background element of a factional membership/patronage/code of conduct could only remain on the Background so long as the PC is behaving in ways that are considered appropriate. A paladin of devotion can't go around burning down orphanages that were otherwise minding their own business; the player doesn't get a free pass from inappropriate behaviour. It's more of a "Don't ask; don't tell" situation. The DM won't bring situations into play specifically test adherence to the oath and the player will play generally compliant with the oath. A Warlock's patron might have him performing actions in downtime in the background, but the table won't be spending time on furthering the Great Old One's goals in the world. Sauntering my way through a lot of pages. This is a busy thread. But, it is good to see that someone here gets precisely what I'm talking about. If you don't like how I describe things, I suggest rereading Nagol's posts. He puts it perfectly well, gets the point immediately and can likely answer any questions better than I can.

Saturday, 22nd September, 2018

  • 04:13 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post Burning Questions: What's the Worst Thing a DM Can Do?
    ...ly 1 surprise die rolled for the party, using the best die (eg one ranger means the whole party is surprised only on a 1 in 6) - so 5e in this respect seems consistent with that strand of D&D tradition. You see, I'm still not sure that in Iserith's example that this would grant an active check. Or weather this counts as 'Keeping Watch' and therefore, in Iserith's mind, is still passive.I've asked him about this and so hopefully will soon learn! As for the example 'with context', take the example in isolation for a moment. There's a few contextual factors that might change the needle here but I they also change the purity of the example, I guess. Whatframing do you think underides the mechanics as set out?What I'm getting at here is my version of iserith's "telegraphing". When I GM, I don't do telegraphing in that way - rather, the telegraphing comes from what the PCs put at stake via the build and play of their PCs from the "story"/narrative point of view (see also my reply to Nagol not far upthread).
  • 04:09 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post Burning Questions: What's the Worst Thing a DM Can Do?
    Heh. I tried to say this in another thread and got dogpiled for it.To be fair, you got dogpiled for saying that it's a game creation engine in which the adventure/scenario is the game that is created. That's not what Nagol said - he pointed to a feature of adjudication of player-declared moves in RPGs.

Monday, 10th September, 2018

  • 09:14 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post X & O For More Fun
    If one person doesn't like horror films we don't invite that person on those occasions when we're going to see one. it's really much closer to the group having a horror movie night and someone else trying to change the genre.I don't have much to add to Nagol's reply. Turning up to play a RPG isn't, per se, turning up to be reminded of some unpleasant or traumatic personal incident that you're rather not (re)engage with as part of your leisure time. To use the spiders/bugs example that has been brought up a few times in the thread: is turning up to play a RPG ipso facto agreeing to be freaked out by bug narratives? I don't see how it is, and I don't see how it's any sort of "tyranny" or "entitlement" to ask the group to step back from that.

Friday, 8th June, 2018

  • 03:23 PM - Manbearcat mentioned Nagol in post Flipping the Table: Did Removing Miniatures Save D&D?
    Of course if it's the level of abstraction that is the issue with SC's for a few/some/many... a better explanation wouldn't have really helped. Some people just want finer granularity and tighter action association in their task resolution and mechanics. I definitely have some sympathy for this position (not because I hold it personally). Players like yourself and @Nagol have been very consistent on this point throughout many conversations over the years. If a gamer has strident Sim priorities and/or they have Sim priorities localized to their D&D play, then 4e's genre-logic and scene-based considerations/techniques (dramatic arc, escalation, narrative causality, fail forward) are going to be problematic, no doubt. And if you try to eschew all of these fundamental components to 4e scene-based play and smuggle in Sim priorities/approaches in their stead, the game is going to push back very hard. You're likely going to end up with boring, stale Skill Challenges where the situation doesn't change dynamically (or much at all), no dramatic arc arises, and it looks/feels like "an exercise in dice rolling." Our conversation many years ago (it was a good one) regarding "the gorge" is probably the benchmark for the dissonance you're ascribing to the game experience for you (and others like you). When your mental framework is predicated upon one very part...

Saturday, 14th April, 2018

  • 04:28 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    Pre-authored the secret door is there for PC's and NPC's to discover or stumble across even before it is "established" (At least in the way established has been used in this thread)...as an example that jumps readily to mind, in some games elves, whether PC's or NPC's would have a chance to detect said secret door just by passing near it, I'm not sure how an ability like this would work in a game where a secret door is never pre-authored it would either mean the ability is virtually useless and never discovers a secret door or it is rolled for every time they enter a room leading to a strange overabundance of secret doors in the world, often in illogical or strange places. Abilities like this definitely seem like a reason to favor one over the other. Nagol has already said some stuff in reply to this; I'll say a bit more. The PCs "stumbling across" a secret door really means that, at certain points, the GM tell the players that their PCs notice a secret door. These moments of telling can be regulated via a complex interaction of pre-authored and pre-mapped architecture, movement rules that require tracking the PC movement on the map, and rules for determining whether or not a PC notices a door when within 10'. That's how AD&D does it. But there are other ways to generate moments of telling. One of the PCs in my Burning Wheel game has the Dreamer ability: as a GM, I'm obliged from time to time to narrate portentous dreams that this PC has had. In effect, the player has paid a modest amount of PC building resources to impose this obligation on the GM. An elven ability to notice secret doors could be handled somewhat similarlly. As far as NPCs stumbling across a secret door - I'm not 100% sure what you have in mind, but that seems ...

Tuesday, 13th March, 2018

  • 11:08 PM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post Any Dungeon World players here?
    I would have pointed you to Cambelll and Manbearcat, but that already happened. I think Nagol also GMs Dungeon World. And I belive AbdulAlhazred has some experience. chaochou is an Apocalypse World player/GM and so might have something to contribute too. I've played it a little bit, and have a general grasp of its approach and methods, but am far from an expert.

Wednesday, 7th March, 2018

  • 03:04 PM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ... be useful if you can answer if you've been swayed in any way. If there are any decent answers to the question you posed in the OP. What is worldbuilding for? If you reply to me, I'd hope you would not cut this question out a third time. I think it'd genuinely be interesting to see your take on it after hundreds of pages of this thread. Certainly there must have been some take away for you?I answered this a long way upthread, I think in multiple posts. A range of answers have been given. Worldbuilding provides material for the GM to share with the players as triggered by their moves - this is generally described as "exploration". On the GM side, this can be a creative exercise. On the player side, it seems to be described mostly in terms of immersion. "Immersion" in this context seems necessarily to involve someone else telling fiction to the player, but that characterisation has been resisted to quite a degree. Worldbuilding provides the players with "levers" to do things - Nagol is the main poster to have talked about this. It hasn't been fully analysed in this thread, but there are multiple ways this could play out. One is in what I would call White Plume Mountain style - worldbuilding provides material, by way of fictional positioning, that the players can directly engage to proffer solutions to the puzzles they are faced with (I call it WPM because the paradigm, in my mind, is removing doors from their hinges so as to "surf" down the frictionless corridor over the pits with super-tetanus spikes). Another, which is less OSR-ish/WPM, and probably therefore more typical in contemporary RPGing, is that the players - by engaging with the "levers" - trigger the GM to narrate stuff in ways that go beyond pre-authoring. When this really starts to reflect player pro-activity, I think that we may see a transition to player-driven play without anyone in the game having to get self-conscious about it. Now that I think about it, AbdulAlhazred has, quite a way upthrea...

Tuesday, 27th February, 2018

  • 06:27 AM - AbdulAlhazred mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    1) principles play would be to curtail action negation through secret backstory. If it's never used, there's not point. No, instead, that was about the mere existence of secret backstory being enough to mean that the DM will not only occasionally veto a declaration, but that they will instead veto every declaration that doesn't fit their 'choose-your-own-adventure' novel backstory. This is clearly false. Well, that wasn't actually the question/commentary. The question was "if it is never going to use it to veto an action declaration, then why does it exist at all?" You COULD answer that, straight up, by providing some sort of reason. In fact some fairly plausible answers HAVE been presented. Nagol for instance suggested that a type of mystery story, and a type of exploration would both benefit from secret backstory or hidden world elements (which is a bit different but COULD be hidden backstory, they're pretty close anyway). I posed some questions, which we may yet examine :) 2) I don't think player-centered games provide all of the same depth of play experience. I think they provide a different play experience, one that can also be deep. This is a point that many have agreed upon, the chess vs checkers argument. The playstyles incorporate different approaches and goals and so can't provide the same experience because they aren't tuned to do so. You can mix and match a bit, but it's mostly importing some traits into a mostly DM or mostly player driven game. I think they can do different things. I actually tend to think that GM-centered play with hidden elements is MORE limited, but there are questions of aesthetics here and nobody can claim they own the final word on it,...

Monday, 26th February, 2018

  • 05:28 PM - pming mentioned Nagol in post Settling a player argument with Suggestion
    Hiya! So Charm Person lasts 1 hour per casting. Once it expires the person you charmed knows you charmed them and may not be all that receptive to you twisting their free will in this fashion. How does that days...weeks...months thing work in this case? I'll answer that for Nagol. He is/was playing 1e AD&D. In it, how long the spell lasted depended on the Intelligence of the creature charmed. If you were some sort of super-genius (19+ Intelligence), the duration was 1 Day. If you were dumb as a rock (3 Intelligence) it was 3 months. If you were of average Intelligence (10 Int, lets say), it was 3 weeks. Yeah...1e Charm Person is nothing to sneeze at. ^_^ Paul L. Ming

Saturday, 24th February, 2018

  • 10:17 PM - Lanefan mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...ans appropriate to their characters. Yet here we have a player who would rather use exploration and wise information gathering in order to go where the action isn't; in effect mitigating or sometimes entirely denying the DM the opportunity to frame these dramatic scenes as long as doing so allows character goals to be met, missions accomplished, etc. This to me is an important form of player agency that is entirely denied by 'go where the action is'. I rather badly waved at this idea a long way upthread; I'll try again here, using the example from pemerton 's game where the PCs were looking for a reliquary, and met some angels en route that showed them the way to get there. As written, the PCs conversed with the angels after which pemerton-as-GM went where the action is and framed the scene in the reliquary; and things proceeded from there. (note this might not be the best example to use but it's one I can remember the gist of without having to dig around) A player using Nagol 's approach loses out on gobs of agency here: - s/he doesn't get the opportunity to explore the approaches to and surroundings of the reliquary before arriving at the drama; which means - - s/he doesn't get a chance to explore the area around the reliquary to determine whether there's more than one possible approach or exit - - s/he doesn't get an opportunity to pre-scout the reliquary itself via stealth or scrying or whatever other means might be available in order to assess its occupants, threats, hazards, etc. - - because of this lack of knowledge s/he isn't able to mitigate potential risks or prepare for a potential encounter via pre-casting spells, downing potions, or whatever other means might be available - before all this, s/he also loses out on any opportunity to explore whatever might lie between the angel encounter site and the reliquary - by bypassing this the GM has arbitrarily decided there's nothing there of relevance rather than allowing the players to find ou...

Friday, 16th February, 2018

  • 02:23 AM - pemerton mentioned Nagol in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    On fiction and existence: this is a response to Ovinomancerr, Nagol, Lanefan, Michael Silverbane and chaochou. To begin: reading, listening, imagining etc are real processes that take place. Imagining involves causal processes in the brain. Listening also involves processes in the ears. Reading also involves processes in the eyes. I am taking the above to be uncontenious, so if you disagree you're going to have to let me know explicitly. There is more to these processes, too, which I will get to below. The process in the brain when these things - reading, listening, imagining - occur involve the linguistic capacity of the person to a high degree. I'm not really across the science of this, and am going to describe it in more colloquial terms: the person who is reading, listening or imagining forms and entertains ideas. Assuming that they know what they are reading, listening to or imagining is a fiction, however, then they don't form beliefs (other than prsently irrelevant beliefs, such as "I am now reading Hound of the Baskervilles"). ...


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Monday, 10th June, 2019

  • 02:06 AM - FrogReaver quoted Nagol in post The Overkill Damage Fallacy
    Well, no. Well yes. I don't think you even remember what my point was.
  • 12:29 AM - FrogReaver quoted Nagol in post The Overkill Damage Fallacy
    You're right. I was looking at it as a variation of Lancaster's Law, but you've set the situation up as a worst case comparison for PC2. PC2 has to perform just as much overkill as PC1 to drop a enemy, but suffers from reduced chance to inflict that whole amount in a single round. Change your scenario by dropping the enemy's hp total to 4 and you'll see a large swing since that's the best case for PC2 (actually anything from 1-4 is best case because PC1 and PC2 both drop an enemy in a single hit at that point) or raise the enemy's hp to 9 so PC1 takes 2 hits to kill and PC2 takes 3. 1. My point remains no matter what happens in the other cases. 2. Some important info The normal use cases are 1. When Hp of X mod 8 and Hp of X mod 4 are equivalent then PC 1 will require Y attacks and PC 2 will require 2Y attacks to defeat the enemy 2. When Hp of X mod 8 and hp of X mod 4 are not equivalent then PC 1 will require Y attacks and PC 2 will require 2Y-1 attacks. The scenario you propose i...

Sunday, 9th June, 2019

  • 10:01 PM - FrogReaver quoted Nagol in post The Overkill Damage Fallacy
    Overkill control is pointless against a single enemy. The goal in that case is at-least-enough kill. Overkill control becomes valuable when dealing with multiple enemies. If that's your rebuttal then you don't understand the argument.

Thursday, 6th June, 2019

  • 01:29 AM - evileeyore quoted Nagol in post The MAYA Design Principle, or Why D&D's Future is Probably Going to Look Mostly Like Its Past
    "Better?" or "Functional?" Better. Fewer systems than one might think are Functional - if you take away their DM-fiat crutch and ask them to walk on their own. Weird definition of 'functional'. But yeah, that is also subjective, but not what I was speaking to. Determining whether a system is functional is subjective but not necessarily biased. Of course it is. You bias it by deciding what you are judging makes it 'functional'. Deciding one functional system is better than another is subjective and necessarily biased. Granted. But it doesn't make your original statement any more accurate. Everyone will have a system they say is 'better' and systems they say are 'worse'.

Wednesday, 5th June, 2019

  • 10:32 PM - evileeyore quoted Nagol in post The MAYA Design Principle, or Why D&D's Future is Probably Going to Look Mostly Like Its Past
    Mistwell Predicts? The Mistophecy; which if I recall correctly was: "You will all play 4e and enjoy it." P.S. The absolute best thing you can do to get better as both a DM and a player, of whatever your favorite edition of D&D, is to play games that are radically different from D&D. Not only will you become a better gamer, but you will likely discover a much better system and abandon D&D for the terrible game it is. No functional system is "better" than any other... That's subjective sir.
  • 12:00 AM - Tony Vargas quoted Nagol in post The MAYA Design Principle, or Why D&D's Future is Probably Going to Look Mostly Like Its Past
    No functional system is "better" than any other, merely different That's very politic of you. But part of my reaction to your list was "oh, right, Aftermath! I have to remember to add that to my reply on the 'games you dropped after one bad session' thread." And, as far as licensed Star Trek games go, Space Opera did it better w/o the license - and also made that same list as downright unplayable. JMHO. It's funny what very different experiences people can get from the same RPG. Mystic Masters is one of the "little game" versions of Champions 3e (I've run multi-year campaigns in 2e, 3e, and 4e). Oh, right, I was trying to remember a separate game called that. I can't say I was impressed, in several places it seemed to pull some unnecessary hand-waving, in others it tried too hard. Conspiracy-X uses the Uni-system engine which also powers All Flesh Must be Eaten, Witchcraft, and a couple other games. Ah, AFMBE I've heard of, sounded good, never got around to trying it, thoug...

Tuesday, 4th June, 2019

  • 11:22 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Nagol in post The MAYA Design Principle, or Why D&D's Future is Probably Going to Look Mostly Like Its Past
    didn't provide enough of a unique/superior game play to usurp any other go-to rule set or get added to my rotation on its own merits. * Off the top of my head: Aftermath, Ars Magica, Pendragon, Champions, Danger International, Conspiracy-X, Teenagers from Outer Space, FASA Star Trek, Mystic Masters, Runequest 3e To be fair, at least two of those aren't any better than D&D. ...and I don't recognize Mystic Masters or Conspiracy-X, so maybe even 4.

Friday, 31st May, 2019

  • 08:12 PM - Saelorn quoted Nagol in post GM's Knowing the Rules
    It quite important to me that the GM knows the rules. The rules act as a shared expectation for how the game world works, what my PC should expect to be able to accomplish and the basic difficulty of actions in the universe. If I base my actions on those expectations and the GM uses a different set to adjudicate, I'm essentially throwing darts while blindfolded.I couldn't have said it better. I'm perfectly fine with house rules, as long as they're declared in advance, so I'm not making any of my decisions under false pretenses. Likewise, if I don't know what the rules are supposed to be, then it won't throw off my planning for the GM to be equally ignorant; but I won't intentionally go into a game without having read the book, and I expect the same courtesy from the GM.

Tuesday, 28th May, 2019

  • 11:08 PM - sledged quoted Nagol in post d20 Classically Modern
    I found a copy on an old backup. It's an OGL supplement. Is it OK to upload here Morrus? What version is the copy?
  • 10:35 PM - Morrus quoted Nagol in post d20 Classically Modern
    Heh. Since the writer put everything except artwork into open game document, I theoretically create a new document, cut and paste this one's text in its entirety and update section 6 to include the original. Too much work. Sure. But I’d update s15, not s6, if I were you.
  • 10:08 PM - Morrus quoted Nagol in post d20 Classically Modern
    I found a copy on an old backup. It's an OGL supplement. Is it OK to upload here Morrus? Sorry, that would be copyright violation unless you get permission from the rights holder.

Sunday, 26th May, 2019

  • 10:55 PM - Lanefan quoted Nagol in post Ye Come Back Inn
    Adventures in Blackmoor is D&D Expert module DA1 (Dave Arneson 1) and is set in Mystara / Arneson's Blackmoor (assigned as Mystara 3,000 years ago) as opposed to Greyhawk's homage location. The mostly indestructible inn contains both a temporal and dimensional gate though the PCs only experience the temporal aspect first hand, dangerous planar critters leak through demonstrating the other. The entire adventure takes place inside different incarnations of the inn -- at least 3 and more likely 6-8. There are 3 distinct versions and one version you can end up visiting in the recent future/past a few times.So does that mean in effect that the Welcome Inn and the Comeback Inn are the same thing/place? That doesn't jive with my memory, but that says nothing as my memory is far from perfect... :)

Friday, 24th May, 2019

  • 06:06 PM - Reaper Steve quoted Nagol in post How do I give XP?
    Did you do into those thread from the main page? They present differently as news items than they do as forum threads. Try finding the same discussions through the forum. Thanks! I just figured that out but you type faster than I do. Enjoy the first 2 XP I've handed out. :)
  • 05:59 PM - Reaper Steve quoted Nagol in post How do I give XP?
    It's not subscription only. Look down at the "Reply to Thread" button. Look at the small text immediately above it. There should be 3 items: Give xp for this post, Laugh with this post, and a small triangle for reporting bad (spam, personal attack, what have you) posts Whoa, that's odd. I see those options in this thread, but not in other threads I am participating in (such as the Renault commercial one and the Essentials Kit one). Thanks... I'm getting closer!
  • 03:33 PM - Ralif Redhammer quoted Nagol in post Systems You Left after One Bad Experience
    Cosigned on both of those. As much as I love Tolkien, the rules just got in the way and it ended up feeling like just a weird, complicated D&D, rather than the world of Middle-Earth. By the time Rifts came along, I was already souring on the Palladium system. It didn’t take much from that to push me over the edge. For me, the most recent game that comes to mind is the Agon RPG. Character creation was the best part of it – we got to create these interesting Hellenistic heroes and communally tell stories of how they met and their legends. Then, once we actually started to play the game, we were all nearly killed by a desert, all our characters left as wretched weaklings. Hardly epic or fun. MERP went maybe 3? sessions where I inflicted a TPK in each session because I could not stop rolling 96+ on the openly rolled dice -- except when the NPCs tried to use non-lethal capture tactics and I had trouble rolling as high as 10. Shelved. Rifts: One PC had a glitterboy. Another was a mundan...

Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019

  • 01:55 AM - Immortal Sun quoted Nagol in post If there's one game where stat differences are justified, what game would that be?
    I've had players who ended up not being protagonists because they refused to do anything adventurous or tried and were wiped out before accomplishing anything. Neither leads to a strong campaign. Sure, I've had the former, they're no longer my players and my Session Zero now includes a caveat "please create a character who is interested in adventuring". Players who don't get one warning "Okay, your character leaves the party and goes off to do his own thing, please create a new character interested in being with the party and doing adventuring things." If they don't, they're asked to leave. I find the latter is a result of one of two things, or a combination of the two: First: Bad luck. Sucks, but that happens. Second: Poorly tuned encounters. Yes, I believe some areas are more dangerous than others and I will kill players who think I'll go easy on them, but in this case I'm referring to areas that were intended to be at-level challenges and just didn't work out that way. CR is a...

Tuesday, 21st May, 2019

  • 09:51 PM - Immortal Sun quoted Nagol in post If there's one game where stat differences are justified, what game would that be?
    Well, yeah there's loads of people with good stats. About 1 person in 40 has an 18 in a stat. Most don't use them in heroic manner. That's why they're not protagonists. The reason they're the protagonists is because they're run by the players. It's not like, until today nobody has ever decided to do anything heroic or adventurous in the world. The characters are only exceptional because they're being puppeteered by these extra-dimensional creatures known as Players.
  • 09:19 PM - Umbran quoted Nagol in post If there's one game where stat differences are justified, what game would that be?
    Your premise depends strongly on how special the PCs are. Most campaigns of D&D I run, the PCs start off just like their neighbours. Heroism comes from choosing to act not nature and all that rot. The PCs aren't special. Okay, fine. Having an 18 strength, even for a man, seems pretty special... If heroism comes from *actions*, that doesn't really inform what stats should be allowed in game. Maybe there's loads of people out there with good stats, but they don't take action that uses them in heroic manners...
  • 08:49 PM - 5ekyu quoted Nagol in post If there's one game where stat differences are justified, what game would that be?
    Your premise depends strongly on how special the PCs are. Most campaigns of D&D I run, the PCs start off just like their neighbours. Heroism comes from choosing to act not nature and all that rot.Yes, you are correct. In the games j run, the average run of the mill is more "commoner" than "1st level PC". So I was basing it on that plus the typical fictions. If the guy next door is as good as your pc, that's a definite different animal of a campaign.

Monday, 20th May, 2019

  • 08:36 PM - lowkey13 quoted Nagol in post John Wick 3- Should You See It?
    Thanks! That's matches my impressions of the trailer, more's the pity. Well, if I told you that: 1. He used a horse as a weapon; and 2. He used a book to absolutely MURDER an NBA player (learning- it puts the FUN in FUNDAMENTAL!); and 3. These were not, ever, remotely, the coolest or craziest parts of the movie; AND 4. You still had two hours to go ... Does that change your mind at all? ;)


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