View Profile: MarkB - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:58 PM
    So basically, a party could pretty reliably hack 1-2 limbs off the average foe in any one given round. Yep, that qualifies as a go-to tactic. Chop the fighter's legs off and finish him from range, or chop the wizard's arms off and face his mighty arcane headbutts.
    110 replies | 1715 view(s)
    1 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:39 PM
    But how do you write it so that the same technique can't be used to cut, say, the sword hand (or head) off a humanoid opponent, and do so in such a way that it is neither so impossibly difficult as to be not worth doing instead of just killing the scorpion, nor so easily achieved that it becomes a go-to move in every combat?
    110 replies | 1715 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:39 PM
    One option here is to give computers a set of mental ability scores and skill proficiencies, and then make hacking a series of Persuasion / Deception / Sleight of Hand / Stealth checks as suits the chosen access method and desired result.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:27 PM
    To me, the Ranger is the Lord of the Rings standard, but not so much Aragorn, who's been many things in his life - it's Faramir and his soldiers, wilderness scouts who can survive in the wilds for extended periods, track enemies, and if necessary ambush them very effectively. I'd consider them to have more in common with Rogues than Fighters, with a useful skillset centred around stealth and...
    30 replies | 537 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Where do you draw the line? And if HP isn't a factor here, what is? Would you make the same ruling for an attack against an unsuspecting ogre? An unsuspecting Glabrezu? An unsuspecting Arch-Druid? An unsuspecting dragon?
    110 replies | 1715 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:23 PM
    Please don't tell me what I think or realise. I reference low AC because I've never seen a cowboy wearing plate mail. If I were going to use D&D in a vanilla Western setting I'd find other ways for characters to gain AC, such as an improved cover system, because I don't visualise cowboys as wearing armour. But if I were going to run a campaign in a modern or near-future setting (which I have),...
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:18 PM
    Indeed, it can work very well that way. The Shadowrunesque game I ran made absolutely no changes to the base classes, only introducing some new optional subclasses and backgrounds.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:14 PM
    As an example of already-existing deadly ranged weapons in 5e that can indeed kill enemies before they even get close? For someone who complains about how much everyone else is missing his point, you certainly have a talent for missing everybody else's point.
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 11:09 PM
    And those changes will dictate changes in tactics, some of which will address the issues you've been raising.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 07:22 PM
    A CR3 Archer from Volo's Guide to Monsters fires twice per round, and deals an average of 8 damage per hit. If the person advancing on them has a low AC, which a character in a Western setting will, they can take down an average-HP character from a 3rd level party in two turns - so, unless their opponent wins initiative and is close enough to close the distance in one turn, yes they can kill them...
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
    1 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 06:03 PM
    Well, to me, that something is the change from "guys in plate armour with huge axes fighting big monsters" to "guys in shirts with pistols fighting other guys in shirts with pistols", but clearly your mileage may vary.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 12:49 PM
    CapnZapp I still feel that your argument that D&D favours moving to close in to melee rather than using cover feels more like theory crafting than actual gameplay practice. But even conceding that it might occur in standard D&D, I still don't see that it will be a factor in a Western setting. In a Western setting, ranged combat is king. Your primary damage dealers are pistols and rifles and...
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 06:09 PM
    Makes sense. That way they can still release the original version on Blu-ray / streaming, and then sell the Special Definitive Edition later, with all the deleted scenes added back in.
    182 replies | 6870 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 12:32 PM
    Thanks. XCOM is actually what specifically comes to mind for me. It's been a back-burner project for me for some time to make an XCOM based campaign, but I've never found a nice system to use, with ready-made modern weapons and armour, and a decent tactical combat system. Maybe once the forthcoming Stargate system is released, I'll try adapting that.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 01:43 AM
    Now that you mention it, while I've seen injury and death handled differently in a variety of systems, I can't think of any I've played that specifically support and encourage tactical ranged combat - and it's something I've occasionally looked for in a system. Is there a particular system that does it well?
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 02:58 AM
    I'd probably go with some basic boost to AC for moving, and the standard bonuses for cover, and then have provision for different builds to specialise further in either evasive movement or hunkering down in cover - much the same as the choice between light or heavy armour in the standard rules.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 02:12 AM
    Rather than Rangers having a Favoured Terrain, I'd prefer to see some form of terrain attunement - at the start of the day they can attune to the environment they're in, gaining bonuses and insights, and they can do so once more during the day as part of a short rest. The process should function almost as a cut-down version of the Commune With Nature spell, granting some insight into the...
    106 replies | 3931 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 07:10 PM
    MarkB replied to Keanu in the MCU
    Ironically, if they successfully made a Fantastic Four movie that built upon the family dynamics, it would probably feel like an Incredibles knock-off.
    23 replies | 640 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 01:00 PM
    As borrowing from other classes isn't an issue, I'd look at importing some of the Arcane Archer's features. I was going to play an Arcane Archer in a recent campaign and wound up just going Battlemaster because it worked better, even for a pure ranged build, but there were still a few things in the AA's toolset I'd have liked to try.
    76 replies | 2541 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 18th June, 2019, 12:18 PM
    Yeah, but increased from what? Denim shirts don't provide much in the way of Armour Class.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 18th June, 2019, 08:35 AM
    One thing I'd do with a Western adaptation of D&D would be to drastically increase the way that cover modifies Armour Class. Essentially, anyone not in cover would have the AC you'd expect an unarmoured D&D character to have, making walking around in the open during combat pretty much suicide except for those specifically built as a high mobility / agility build. But anyone in decent cover would...
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 18th June, 2019, 01:37 AM
    If both sides are using ranged weapons, then neither side is trying to get close. Instead, they're firing at each other from positions of cover in an extended ranged battle. Which is exactly like any typical Western movie.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 17th June, 2019, 10:06 PM
    It's important in the sense that, if you want to adapt 5e to a genre where minions are expected, it has the tools for the job - and those tools aren't even crude or rudimentary.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 17th June, 2019, 09:41 PM
    D&D 5e handles it just fine, even with pretty much standard encounter design. The whole point of Bounded Accuracy is that it keeps opponents of varied levels relevant in a fight - you can easily throw in a bunch of low-level minions alongside the tough bruisers, and it'll work fine in terms of both encounter design and XP budget.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 17th June, 2019, 12:30 AM
    Still, you don't know what the target looks like, only its location and probably its rough mass. Line up a perfect headshot on what you assume to be an unarmoured human wizard, and it'll be a clean miss if it turns out to actually be a heavily armoured halfling cleric. I'd tend towards you still having disadvantage for not actually seeing the target, which cancels out the advantage for them not...
    19 replies | 674 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 11:35 PM
    Not very realistic for that specific sort of duel, I agree. But in an RPG where I'm hoping to be playing the same character for more than a session or two, I'd prefer that to having the outcome essentially determined by who rolls the higher initiative.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 06:37 PM
    Tremorsense lets you know where a creature is, but it doesn't specifically say that it overcomes the Blinded condition, or the effects of obscured terrain. As a DM ruling, I'm not sure that I'd consider it to be equivalent to vision for the purposes of overcoming disadvantage on attacks, or advantage on incoming attacks.
    19 replies | 674 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 01:41 PM
    And there are plenty of genres which D&D's approach is suited to, and which have guns in them.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 12:55 PM
    The "D&D doesn't do guns well" comment that I originally responded to was in reference to using D&D in a Space Opera setting, not a Wild West one. Space Opera isn't too far removed from high fantasy when it comes to the durability of its heroes. And even in a Wild West setting, do you really want that level of lethality in an RPG? In pretty much any RPG player characters are meant to survive...
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 10:50 AM
    In which case it makes just as much of a mockery out of the lethality of swords, or axes, or bows, as any one of those will kill you in a single solid hit. Even in the real world far more people survive firearm wounds each year than are killed by them, and in heroic fiction such as action movies the protagonists will have huge volumes of lead fired in their direction through the course of the...
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
    3 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 16th June, 2019, 12:44 AM
    They don't handle guns very well if they're bolted on top of existing medieval weapons, and treated as something different and special. But if you just take the stats of standard slings and crossbows and longbows, and change the names to phasers / blasters / whatever, then D&D handles guns just fine.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Saturday, 15th June, 2019, 05:42 PM
    I've run that. There was a sadly-unsuccessful Kickstarter project called Code::2050, and I used their basic SRD to run a 12-session campaign at our club. It worked really well.
    391 replies | 10368 view(s)
    2 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Wednesday, 12th June, 2019, 12:18 AM
    It may be browser dependent, but clicking on the hashtagged post number in the very top right of the post (or right-clicking and copying the URL) should get you a link that jumps straight to the post.
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
    2 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 11:16 PM
    To be absolutely completely fair, the players' description was in post #242. Post #213 was a reply by Hussar, and post #214 was the original link to John Dodd's blog, and contained no excerpts.
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 11:07 PM
    Here's what I don't get. You can somehow hold in your head the position that people talking about someone having to stop running public games at conventions is a cruelty that you need to speak out about, while also holding the position that someone straight-up confronting someone with a scenario of being raped is no big deal, and not worth making a public fuss about. Then maybe the situation...
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
    2 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 09:00 PM
    First, some traumas are a lot more commonplace than others. Second, you don't need to have experienced rape in order to find it highly disturbing when someone describes it happening to a character whose reactions you are portraying. Seriously, is this really something you feel the need to downplay?
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
    4 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 08:54 PM
    What hallmarks, exactly? For attention seekers, the people who raised the issue have been remarkably reticent - which is partially why it took awhile for the full story to emerge. A couple of posts outlining events from their perspective, and that's it. It would be difficult for them to have sought less attention short of complete silence.
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 08:05 PM
    Sorry, but I just can't parse this reply. It feels like it's missing some words. Can you clarify?
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 07:26 PM
    Wouldn't it bother you that your "in the moment" solution would leave them free to be just as cruel again, when you're not looking?
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 07:15 PM
    So, when you have clear evidence of somebody behaving cruelly towards others, how would you proceed in resolving that situation?
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Saturday, 8th June, 2019, 03:01 AM
    It's a start, but it's hardly a reliable indicator of reformed behaviour. And "But he apologised!" would be a poor excuse for the organisers to fall back on if he was allowed into another con and then caused similar issues.
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Saturday, 8th June, 2019, 12:24 AM
    Well, first of all, does it really deny that possibility? We're not talking about banning this individual from DMing, only banning him from doing so during certain periodical public events. He can do as much DMing as he likes outside of those events, and can choose to better himself or not to do so. And second, how could anyone possibly adjudicate whether or not someone has "rehabilitated"...
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Thursday, 6th June, 2019, 10:43 PM
    Here, I've enchanted this friendly mollusc to whisper a reminder to you on a regular basis. Just set him down next to your ear canal and he'll take care of you.
    7 replies | 461 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Thursday, 6th June, 2019, 10:12 PM
    Right, because raising a complaint in a crowded room within a few feet of the person you're complaining about wouldn't be socially awkward or uncomfortable at all.
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
    3 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Thursday, 6th June, 2019, 07:08 PM
    There are ways to handle that. The players in Critical Role did so quite neatly in a recent episode, by using Disguise Self to take on the guise of the corpse's former allies before casting the spell. One useful thing about corpses is that they don't do well at Insight checks.
    68 replies | 2843 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Thursday, 6th June, 2019, 06:49 PM
    In my experience, interrogations in D&D are far more likely to involve mind-influencing spells than torture. Forcing someone to want to tell you their secrets is more effective than forcing them to tell you their secrets unwillingly.
    68 replies | 2843 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Wednesday, 5th June, 2019, 12:34 AM
    Hmm, so I could just say "okay" and then never read this thread again... Yeah, that works. Go for it!
    33 replies | 1364 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Wednesday, 5th June, 2019, 12:29 AM
    If we start setting a minimum bar of social maturity for new tabletop RPG players, the hobby won't last long.
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th June, 2019, 10:45 PM
    I dislike the concept of the M-Card as it feels like a challenge rather than a safety feature. It's saying "are you edgy and adult enough to play at my table?" And then if a player who wasn't expecting to have difficulties with the content finds that something unexpectedly comes up that does bother him, it's like a commitment. "I promised I'd be mature and edgy enough to be in this game - I...
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
    5 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th June, 2019, 07:18 PM
    Yep - I love it. For me, it did the whole "urban divinity" thing better than most of its contemporaries. I'll take it over American Gods any day.
    32 replies | 1400 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 4th June, 2019, 07:05 PM
    That part wasn't on the sign-up sheet. From the description on the sheet, it could just as easily have been "summer camp for monsters", and as mentioned by other posters, a "mature content" warning covers a lot of ground - it could as easily have meant explicit language, graphic violence, consensual sexual content, or any of a number of things. It was only once we got to the table that we were...
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 3rd June, 2019, 11:44 PM
    But they did also have a good implementation of the ruleset and plenty of character options, and those things made the good story a lot more fun to play through. It's not one or the other - you need both.
    99 replies | 5041 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Monday, 3rd June, 2019, 11:09 PM
    I've actually found myself in a game not too far-removed from this at a convention. The scenario was vaguely described on the sign-up sheet as a "monster camp" scenario, though it did specify the inclusion of adult themes. This turned out to be a metaphor for religious "straight camps", with the GM using the scenario of players as classic monsters (vampires, werewolves, etc.) who didn't want to...
    419 replies | 18334 view(s)
    3 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 2nd June, 2019, 05:31 PM
    I was going to ration it out to an episode or two a day, but I've ended up binge-watching it all between last night and today. An excellent adaptation that manages to capture pretty much all the essentials from the novel, and brings the story to the screen very well. If I had any criticisms, it would be that the demon costumes/headgear were a little on the silly side, and that the kids didn't...
    32 replies | 1400 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Sunday, 2nd June, 2019, 02:28 AM
    Amazon UK are offering a one-week Prime trial subscription for 99p. Should be plenty of time to get through the series.
    32 replies | 1400 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Saturday, 1st June, 2019, 08:49 PM
    That always carries the inherent risk of making the players more angry at the DM than the BBEG.
    9 replies | 523 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Friday, 31st May, 2019, 11:29 PM
    Well, Minsc is also back. Here's hoping he's a playable character. And the reward levels in a videogame don't have to conform to the standard tabletop levels. For one thing, they can easily do away with bounded accuracy, and require higher-level weapons and armour to take on higher-level foes.
    99 replies | 5041 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Friday, 31st May, 2019, 10:55 PM
    That's fine to some extent, but there's also the factor that people will often play con games in order to try out a new or obscure system and see whether it's for them. If they then buy the system and find out that it's glaringly different than what they experienced, that's not going to be fun for them.
    50 replies | 1928 view(s)
    1 XP
  • MarkB's Avatar
    Thursday, 30th May, 2019, 07:28 PM
    Kinda sucks to B B4, I guess.
    49 replies | 1574 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Thursday, 30th May, 2019, 07:02 PM
    The more significant issue is that he sacrificed his life during his last on-screen appearance.
    49 replies | 1574 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Wednesday, 29th May, 2019, 11:54 PM
    Or Lore. Or B4.
    49 replies | 1574 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 01:04 PM
    Was that an autocorrect of Tabasco, or is there such a thing as Tobacco Sauce?
    48 replies | 4734 view(s)
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  • MarkB's Avatar
    Tuesday, 28th May, 2019, 08:29 AM
    In terms of checking whether a creature suspects you of being disguised, I'd play it as a Charisma (Deception) check opposed by other peoples' passive Wisdom (Insight) checks. Anyone who doesn't know the person you're disguised as doesn't get a check. If a person has specific reason to doubt you, they may make an active check as an action. As the Intelligence (Investigation) check requires an...
    23 replies | 844 view(s)
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Saturday, 25th May, 2019


Sunday, 21st April, 2019

  • 08:46 PM - pukunui mentioned MarkB in post Star Wars IX: The Rise of Skywalker Trailer
    MarkB: Yes, George likened the dark side to a cancer and balance meant getting rid of it, not making it even with the “light side”. That was an EU concept which, unfortunately, seems to have become the official stance under Disney. The Rebels cartoon hinted at that a number of times. And in the new movies, we got Leia in TFA telling Han she could sense that there was still “light” in their son rather than “good”. That irked me. And then Luke in TLJ tells Rey that the Force was comprised of both light and dark, and Snoke talks about how the light side has raised a champion (Rey) to counter his dark side champion (Kylo). Sigh ...

Monday, 18th March, 2019


Wednesday, 6th March, 2019

  • 02:53 AM - CleverNickName mentioned MarkB in post Critical Role Kickstarter Predition Game: Guess the Funding Outcome (GTFO)
    ...09 chrisrtld: $13,635,019 pogre: $13,500,000 Aebir-Toril: $13,224,376.89 Satyrn: $13,000,000 Yardiff: $12,456,145 -----------Highest-Funded Game Project on Kickstarter (Kingdom Death: Monster 1.5) $12,393,139-------- Radaceus: $12,345,678.91 FarBeyondC: $12,345,678.90 Morrus: $12,000,000 Mistwell: $11,800,000 Mort: $11,620,000 Zardnaar: $11,354,883 <--- The Winner! Sadras: $11,120,000 SkidAce: $11,000,000 Tazawa: $10,700,000 togashi_joe: $10,250,000 DM Dave1: $10,101,010 MichaelSomething: $10,000,000 Lazybones: $9,750,000 PabloM: $9,500,000 akr71: $9,250,000 rczarnec: $9,250,000 Azzy: $9,000,000 Henry: $8,900,000 mortwatcher: $8,666,000 Lidgar: $8,423,976.73 vincegetorix: $8,360,000 SmokeyCriminal: $8,008,135 AriochQ: $7,777,777 robus: $7,750,000 MarkB: $7,500,000 phantomK9: $6,969,696 TarionzCousin: $6,160,000 ClaytonCross: $6,000,000 ---------Highest-Funded Film Project on Kickstarter (MST3K Kickstarter) $5,764,229----------- MaximusArael020: $5,685,000 Prakriti: $1

Wednesday, 19th December, 2018


Saturday, 1st December, 2018

  • 04:30 PM - dragoner mentioned MarkB in post Need idea about player spaceship landing on planets
    You beat me to it! Thanks, I also like the ecological impact of MarkB it could be something like a fusion rocket. Depending upon the setting and the society, you could go for an ecological angle. The shuttle is designed with atmospheric flight in mind, and has a propulsion system that works well for that context. But the ship's engines produce waste products including radioactive particles, dangerous carcinogens etc. ...

Monday, 17th September, 2018

  • 07:35 PM - iserith mentioned MarkB in post Roleplay opportunities in a mine (level 2)
    A social interaction challenge (because combat and exploration are roleplay!) might be the ghost of a miner who died in a cave-in who isn't aware of it. If the PCs can figure out what happened and explain it to the ghost, he or she can move on to the afterlife. If the PCs are successful, the miner shares with them a tunnel that serves as a useful shortcut around a dangerous area (perhaps a cave filled with odorless, explosive gas) and/or leads to a cave that contains a treasure. Edit: Dang! MarkB upstaged me!

Monday, 26th February, 2018

  • 09:06 PM - lowkey13 mentioned MarkB in post Musings on the "Lawful Jerk" Paladin
    ...r less entirely subjective. Mmmmm..... I give you all the points for "Paladin issues marinated[.]" It's like the worst steak ever. "Why does our kobold fillet taste so bad? It has to be the Paladin marinade!" Anyway, a quick point- OD&D- Paladin lost status by chaotic act; could not regain status. EVER, MAN! See Greyhawk supplement. 1e- If they perform a chaotic act, must confess and do penance. If evil act, cannot regain status. EVER. 2e- Same as 1e. Although it helpfully creates a rule because 1e had "knowingly commit" evil act, so 2e includes the whole, "You got charmed, yo, and now you have to atone!" So ... part of the problem, as it is with most things, is that weird translation from OD&D to 1e. "Chaotic" in OD&D meant, um, evil. Moorcockian. But by dragging out the whole different penalties in 1e/2e, it confused a lot of people, and (IME), most people just conflated the rules and made it, "If Evil, must atone." But contra what you are writing, and what MarkB is positing, these weren't the parts of the code that got people in trouble. There might have been some bad DMs out there, but as a general rule, the DM wasn't looking to strip you of your powers. Instead, and again IME, it was the rules about who the Paladin could party with ... um, who could be in the Paladin's party, that led to the whole "Jerky McJerkface telling the party what to do" reputation. That, and the fact that we all know Paladins suck and need to be excised from the game.

Wednesday, 14th February, 2018

  • 09:31 AM - Hussar mentioned MarkB in post Discovery Trailer
    I came to that conclusion maybe ten pages ago. These peeps need this show to be the best, actual show be damned! Sent from my C6603 using EN World mobile app Who says it needs to be best? I like it. I am not seeing the issues that you are pointing to, or, rather, the issues that are being pointed to are very much not issues for me. IOW, MarkB hits it square on the head. Like I said earlier, I get that people don't like the show. And that's groovy. There's stuff I haven't liked too. Fair enough. The difference is, I'm not jumping through hoop after hoop in order to justify my feelings. I'm not misinterpreting tropes in order to "prove" how bad Disco is. I'm not playing silly buggers cherry picking games to "prove" that they don't care about canon. I'm not trying to prove anything. I like the show. That's the end of that conversation.

Sunday, 4th February, 2018

  • 02:34 PM - pemerton mentioned MarkB in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...yle mystery scenario, getting the GM to read you bits of his/her notes is the whole point of play: get the clue from here, find the tome there, find the cultists' ritual headquaters, etc. This is all about learning what is in the GM's notes. It's not (or need not be) the GM reading a story: the sequence may not correspond to any particular pre-planned sequence, and there may not be any particular structure of rising action, complication, climax, etc. You also continually use examples of bad GMing to make your point that option 1 is a bad thing.Well, I make do with the examples I have. I don't believe that you've posted any actual play examples. (If you have, and I've missed them, I apologise - can you point me back to them?) The example of the map came (I think) from Lanefan - at least, it has been established in lengthy back-and-forth with him. The example of the plot on the Duke came from Lanefan. The example of the attempt to find bribeable officials came from MarkB. Are you saying that these are all examples of bad GMing? So what does good GMing look like, in this context? What is a good use of secretly-established fictional positioning being used by a GM to establish that a player's action declaration fails, without regard to the action resolution mechanics? A good GM will not send his players on a wild goose chase through the mansion for a map macguffin.So what would the pre-authorship be used for? Even the fiction that I've "pre-authored" can be impacted (or changed entirely if the situation calls for it) at any time by the players' actions - they are the heroes after all.Can you give an example of what you mean? For instance - and I am going to give an example I am familiar with, as I don't have much to go on from your game - I have a PC in my 4e game whose goal is to reconstruct the Rod of Seven Parts. He got the first part at the start of 2nd level. The campaign is now 30th level and he and his friends are in a fight that will de...

Friday, 2nd February, 2018

  • 12:35 PM - pemerton mentioned MarkB in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...shing a story of an orc. If the person asserts (as I think Emerikol does) that "As a player I only want to add those embellishments that correspond to causal powers exercised by my PC in the gameworld, so I will embellish deaths caused by my PC, but not maps discovered by my PC" that's his/her prerogative. It's a type of aesthetic preference. (As well as Emerikol, Lanefan has advocated it strongly in this thread.) My claims about it are two. (1) It is not more "realistic", or less "Schroedinger-y" than embellishing other parts of the fiction. (2) It means that a reasonable amount of your play experience will involve the GM telling you stuff that s/he made up (either in advance in his/her notes, or stuff that s/he makes up as needed but that is to be treated the same by the game participants as if it were part of his/her pre-authored notes). The reason for (2) I take to be obvious given the extensive discussion of it in this thread, and the example provided by Lanefan, MarkB and others. And the more the game involves "exploration" - that is, the players declaring actions which have, as an outcome, their PCs learning about the gameworld (eg opening doors, finding bribeable officials, searching for maps, etc) rather than their PCs changing the gameworld (eg by killing orcs or befriending strangers) - then the more that (2) will obtain. Furthermore, given that a PC's success in changing the gameworld often depends (in the imaginary causal processes) upon unknown but relevant factors (eg the armour of the orc; the temperament of the stranger) then even changing the gameworld through action declarations can become hostage to a resolution process that does not permit the player to embellish other elements of the shared fiction. For instance, if we go from player action declaration through resolution mechanics through embellishment that reflects outcome, then it is possible to have combat systems like D&D (AC, roll to hit, determine outcome from that) and h...

Thursday, 1st February, 2018

  • 12:38 AM - pemerton mentioned MarkB in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...GM, that's not counterindicative at all of having trust issues about the GM being unfair.The last sentence is not something I intend to reply to. I'm not interested in analysing my own conjectured self-doubts in this thread. As I've said, a more prosaic explanation for my preferences is available - my pleasure in RPGing does not come from telling my friends stuff that I wrote in response to them making moves for their PCs that oblige me to engage in such tellings. As for the first bit, you are correct that I "seem to couch [my] arguments from a position where the DM is uses secret knowledge and fiat in ways that benefit the DM's ideas over the players". The reason it seems like that is because it is like that. (I didn't clarify that in my first reply because I assumed it was obvious.) And the reason I couch my arguments (I would prefer to say "analysis", but that's orthogonal) from that position is because that position is correct. Which is what I said was evident in the post from MarkB: inherent in the use of secret backstory as a factor in adjudication is that the GM's ideas are given priority in establishing the content of the shared fiction. I'll respond to the following bit too, though, if you like, though I think it's repetition: a GM may be fair or unfair in saying (on the basis not of action resolution, but of secretly established fictional content) that the map is not in the study where the players have declared that the PCs are searching the study for it. If every other bit of information points to the map being in the study, it's probably unfair. If the PCs have a potion of map detecing with a range that will encompass the whole house (kitchen as well as study) but are not using it, then what the GM is doing is probably fair. I don't care whether it's fair or not. The reason I don't like it is because I find it uninteresting. When I RPG, I don't want to engage in an activity in which my friends are spending most of their time trying to establish - by ...

Monday, 29th January, 2018

  • 02:15 AM - pemerton mentioned MarkB in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...layer agency in a GM setting-driven game, as it was completely orthogonal from the GM's setting. (Eg we had fragments of a prophecy, and we spent a lot of time debating them, imagining how we could read various PCs into various roles outlined in the prophecy, etc. I assume that the GM had some conception, in his mind, of what the prophecy meant and how the events of play related to it, but they were absolutely irrelevant to what we players were talking about. We could have done our stuff just as easily if the GM had simply handed us three random prophecies downloaded from a Google search.) Clearly, you don't trust that players have any form of agency in any game that has substantive GM backstory and adjudication. You're denying that they do all over the place here and in your response to Lanefan. And you don't really seem to trust us when we say that player do have agency in the games we're running in which we do make use of substantial backstory and adjudication. Your response to MarkB here is fairly dripping with it. "you think it is" makes it very clear that you don't believe him or think it's true. It's like you're calling him out but acknowledge he's not technically lying because he seems to believe it's true.We're doing analysis here. Trying to dig down into the processes of play is not "calling someone out". I don't think MarkB is lying. I do think that the suggestion that I don't trust GMs is (i) false, and (ii) irrelevant - as if the only reason someone would play DungeonWorld rather than 2nd ed AD&D is because they don't trust GMs! But anyway, on to the issue of agency: Here is one of my assertions - if the GM is entitled, at any point in the process of resolution to (i) secretly author backstory, or (ii) secrety rewrite backstory, and (iii) to use that secret backstory as if it was part of the fictional positioning so as to (iv) automatically declare an action declaration unsuccessful ("No, the map's not in the study") - then I assert that every acti...

Saturday, 20th January, 2018

  • 05:00 AM - pemerton mentioned MarkB in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    In many ways, they do the same thing, it’s just the puzzle is a little different, less constrictive, and possibly more complex. Instead of a relatively simple puzzle of doping out the best way to maximize treasure within a single dungeon, they might be working on visiting all of the adventuring sites in the region, foiling the impending invasion of the orcsish legion, stopping the predation of a wicked dragon, or just visiting interesting places.The last of these doesn't sound like a puzzle at all. As for the others, as I posted not far upthread (in response to Sadras and MarkB), I'm curious about how the puzzle-solving works, when there are so many (imaginary) elements in play which can introduce parameters to the puzzle to which the players have no access (in practical terms). I don’t see those as unsolvable, but then I don’t really buy into describing RPG gaming, even limited to dungeon crawls, as puzzles to solve. Unless the puzzle is figuring out how to have fun pretending to be a halfling Paladin or half-orc summoner.Right. As the OP said, I think puzzle-solving play is not so common in contemporary RPGing. Given that it's not, then, what is worldbuilding for?

Thursday, 18th January, 2018

  • 11:39 PM - Lanefan mentioned MarkB in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    ...e notes on any of it. Having it pre-designed even if just in broad strokes makes the describing so much easier. Particularly at the start of the campaign when the players in theory know much less about the game world than their PCs do (canon lawyers for pre-fab settings notwithstanding) the DM has a lot of describing to do and as a side effect of that description is going to drop the PCs into a particular setting be it a steamy jungle, a city based on ancient Athens, a snowy Viking camp, or a pleasant sunny farm village. You'd probably call this railroading, but how else can it work? Of course, that's just the start; if the PCs in the Viking camp immediately decide to go someplace warmer then the DM has to react to that. (one hopes she has a broad-strokes regional or continental map showing areas beyond a short radius around the camp!) Are you able to say more about how you see the GM's work on the setting in advance of play feeding through to give the players that sense? MarkB might see it differently, but for my part it's much easier to figure out a character's motivations, beliefs, goals, etc. when there's a culture (or cultures) and common history to fit into. If, say, the setting history shows that our starting town was devastated by a war ten years ago and since rebuilt, that's going to influence my character and what she thinks; and probably influence other characters as well. But if the starting history shows no such war it's not our place as players to just add it in. We have no right to, as world design is not in our purview. And if there's no pre-designed history then what's the point? What happened before our PCs became PCs? What major events shaped their lives? (it should be obvious but I'd better mention: the DM sets the event but the player chooses what influence it had on her character, if any). Lanefan

Thursday, 28th December, 2017

  • 04:08 AM - ArchfiendBobbie mentioned MarkB in post Han Solo movie incoming....
    MarkB I thought Force Awakens: Incredible Cross Sections was canon due to being written and published after Disney acquired Star Wars?
  • 03:31 AM - ArchfiendBobbie mentioned MarkB in post Han Solo movie incoming....
    MarkB Maybe. But if so, that's a retcon of the Falcon's history. It was originally a freight pusher for orbit; that's why it had the cockpit to the side instead of the YT-standard central cockpit.

Saturday, 23rd December, 2017

  • 02:05 AM - Hussar mentioned MarkB in post Tension, Threats And Progression In RPGs
    Yeah, I gotta go with MarkB on this one. What's the point of trying to draw boxes around whether something is a "game" or not. Like any genre discussion, it's ultimately a deep, deep dive down a dark rabbit hole. And, I would also point out that I don't think anyone has advocated completely taking death off the table either. Just making it a bit more rare.

Friday, 8th December, 2017

  • 03:27 PM - redrick mentioned MarkB in post Losing HP as you level up
    I usually forget that one even can roll for hit points on leveling up. I doubt it's something the designers give much thought to as well. Agree with MarkB, incentivizing rolling for hp would be counterproductive — average hp should be the preferred option. Easier to keep track of, doesn't lead to pointless power differential between characters, takes nothing away from the RP. If rolling for hp, on average, gave you better results, we'd have players groaning and complaining when I said, "and we'll all just take average hp on level up." With the average being statistically better, nobody even notices that rolling for it is gone after a level or two. (If they ever noticed at all.) Roll dice for PC actions. Live with the consequences. But why randomize the squishiness of a character?

Sunday, 17th April, 2016

  • 11:54 PM - Quickleaf mentioned MarkB in post Hard sci-fi question: rotational artificial gravity space station
    ...the questions I'm trying to determine. How high up do you have to climb a building for there to be noticeable change in gravity. I think it would affect how high-rise type buildings were constructed, since the shearing forces (might be using the wrong term) between regular G and lower-G would require stronger building materials. Plus it might suggest activities happening at the upper levels of high-rise buildings would be substantially different...for example moving construction activities to the lower-G zones for increased efficiency. RangerWickett Really helpful on how to visualize entering at the zero-G "fixed" axis and seeing the entire station spin around you. I suspected some kind of shuttle or elevator would be necessary, but hadn't conceived of exactly why... I plugged a 500 m radius in and got a Tangential Velocity (or "rim speed") of 156 mph, which would be "splat your dead" for anyone moving or falling from the zero-G axis to the ground...in scientific terms :) MarkB That's another one of my questions. I mean, nothing we throw on Earth actually travels straight, technically. But in the rotational artificial G environment I'm wondering if it would be more obvious...or would it basically be a case of "throwing a baseball while in a moving car"? In other words, if everything/everyone is rotating at the same rate in relation to each other, there doesn't appear to be any change from Earth-standard gravity (assuming 1 g centripetal acceleration). But what happens if I punt a football down a field or fire a railgun at the elevator/shuttle tube along the central axis when the station is rotating at 1.3 rpms and the rim is spinning at 156 mph?


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Wednesday, 26th June, 2019

  • 09:39 PM - Tony Vargas quoted MarkB in post Attacking defenseless NPCs
    But I don’t think you’re forbidden from bypassing HP simply because HP exists. HP are a mechanism the game presents for resolving uncertainty. Was so-and-so killed by such-and-such? Yes/No: narrate it. Not certain: determine damage and compare to remaining hps. Saying that's "bypassing hps" is doing it out of order. Hit points only come into it if you're not sure they're dead. It's like resolving any other action declaration. Sometimes you just don't call for a check. If a player declares "I waste him with my crossbow." Then the DM narrating "He falls to the floor twitching and bleeding for a few moments, then is still," is as valid as "Roll to hit." How would the player know that? I mean, to begin with, how did you the DM know that a pointed crossbow didn't inhibit or prevent an effective defense?The DM exercised judgement, the player would only know it if he asked took some action to determine if it were true or not (possibly a mental action, like, "in my years of mil...
  • 09:10 PM - Satyrn quoted MarkB in post Attacking defenseless NPCs
    So basically, a party could pretty reliably hack 1-2 limbs off the average foe in any one given round. Yep, that qualifies as a go-to tactic. Chop the fighter's legs off and finish him from range, or chop the wizard's arms off and face his mighty arcane headbutts. I'm under the impression that Bawylie was picturing a scenario where the opponent has been pinned down or is otherwise rendered defenseless before the stinger-removal or limb-chopping could take place. That would be my requirement, anyway. I'm not worried about that being the go-to move, though, since I've taken to ignoring the idea that there are high-level NPCs. Like all humans have 2 hit dice no matter what, so chopping limbs off them would take longer than just killing them.
  • 09:08 PM - Bawylie quoted MarkB in post Attacking defenseless NPCs
    So basically, a party could pretty reliably hack 1-2 limbs off the average foe in any one given round. Yep, that qualifies as a go-to tactic. Chop the fighter's legs off and finish him from range, or chop the wizard's arms off and face his mighty arcane headbutts. They could. And the same might happen to them too. In practice it isn’t as go-to as it seems. At least not in my games so far. They’ve decapitated some zombies and did cut the sting off a Wyvern, though.
  • 08:51 PM - Bawylie quoted MarkB in post Attacking defenseless NPCs
    But how do you write it so that the same technique can't be used to cut, say, the sword hand (or head) off a humanoid opponent, and do so in such a way that it is neither so impossibly difficult as to be not worth doing instead of just killing the scorpion, nor so easily achieved that it becomes a go-to move in every combat? The same way I adjudicate most other actions. You’ve got a fighter or whoever that wants to chop off an opponent’s limb with their weapon. That’s a clear enough goal and approach for me to know what check to ask for and what DC to set. I’ll ask for a weapon attack versus the target’s AC because that most closely approximates what’s happening in the narrative. Now this isn’t just a hit, but a hit to a special place with a potential added effect. So I’ll ask for the attack roll with disadvantage to hit the limb - it’s a hard target to get just right. Then I’ll compare the damage to the target’s constitution score and if the damage is greater than or equal to the consti...
  • 08:00 PM - Oofta quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    One option here is to give computers a set of mental ability scores and skill proficiencies, and then make hacking a series of Persuasion / Deception / Sleight of Hand / Stealth checks as suits the chosen access method and desired result. I was thinking more along the lines of alternate ability scores for hacking. Use intelligence instead of charisma or dexterity. That way opening a lock could use the same skill but still be logical for what ability score you're using. Depends on the genre though, are you going for more-or-less current tech or something with real AI? Real AI (like Fallout) I could see persuasion / deception working.
  • 07:44 PM - Satyrn quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    Guys the OP has requested you stop arguing about something unrelated to his original intent. Can one of you just start your own thread and continue this there (since it will clearly never end)? Edit: Oops. I didn't mean to quote you Matthia. One option here is to give computers a set of mental ability scores and skill proficiencies, and then make hacking a series of Persuasion / Deception / Sleight of Hand / Stealth checks as suits the chosen access method and desired result. I like how that mirrors the recent rules that give vehicles the physical ability scores, and it gives a natural way to create KITT.
  • 01:01 PM - Michael Silverbane quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    Indeed, it can work very well that way. The Shadowrunesque game I ran made absolutely no changes to the base classes, only introducing some new optional subclasses and backgrounds. Similarly the X-Crawl game that I ran some time ago. When the party engaged in adventures outside the confines of the dungeon, guns featured prominently, and required no house ruling or changes whatsoever (except deciding how machineguns worked).

Tuesday, 25th June, 2019

  • 11:59 PM - Dannyalcatraz quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    I reference low AC because I've never seen a cowboy wearing plate mail. If I were going to use D&D in a vanilla Western setting I'd find other ways for characters to gain AC, such as an improved cover system, because I don't visualise cowboys as wearing armour. Feats or class features could add HP and/or improve AC based on how tough as nails they are. Or how preternaturally aware of their surroundings they are. I could see one that reduces damage to 1 pt per die done on a successful save because the character has extremely fast reflexes and turns hits into merely being winged.
  • 11:45 PM - Tony Vargas quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    I'm talking about how in a hp-based game you can* act like Conan the Barbarian and just stride up to your opponent - your hit points protect you. Actually they are there for that purpose. You can, in D&D, at a point. That point is reasonably high level, and if you're willing to have your Conan be more the later REH version, in full armor. If you're insisting on the oiled-up bodybuilder movie version, you'll really need a whole lot of hps, more than D&D typically gives you. Well, and if you have some way of dishing out the sheer volume of attacks to build yourself a pile of dead bodies to stand on... less-than-1HD enemies in 1e, or Great Cleave or whatever. If you want characters to move and act "naturally", not exposed, behind cover, it is perfectly understandable to want to explore other games than hp-based ones. Games where not just the last bullet poses the threat.... that has very little to do with "realism" or "firearms should be deadlier than axes" The only two factors there...
  • 11:30 PM - Oofta quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    Please don't tell me what I think or realise. I reference low AC because I've never seen a cowboy wearing plate mail. If I were going to use D&D in a vanilla Western setting I'd find other ways for characters to gain AC, such as an improved cover system, because I don't visualise cowboys as wearing armour. But if I were going to run a campaign in a modern or near-future setting (which I have), I'd leave armour exactly as it is, and just re-skin it as Kevlar or similar modern body armour. I might still let my cowboys wear armor because the world would be different with magic and dragons. Maybe instead of steel it's hardened giant spider silk, needs to be adamantium or even just say that the dwarves make really high quality steel.
  • 11:16 PM - CapnZapp quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    A CR3 Archer from Volo's Guide to Monsters fires twice per round, and deals an average of 8 damage per hit. If the person advancing on them has a low AC, which a character in a Western setting will, they can take down an average-HP character from a 3rd level party in two turns - so, unless their opponent wins initiative and is close enough to close the distance in one turn, yes they can kill them before being punched in the face.Low AC... high damage... Few hit points. It's all aspects of the same thing. It all represents your growing realization it is the hit point based damage model that is the crux of the issue. Not saying you can't overcome it. Only that it's quite natural if you decide not to, and swit h to a non-hp based game.
  • 10:50 PM - CapnZapp quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    Well, to me, that something is the change from "guys in plate armour with huge axes fighting big monsters" to "guys in shirts with pistols fighting other guys in shirts with pistols", but clearly your mileage may vary.Don't be silly. No D&D based wild west game will keep the rules, character stats and class abilities exactly the same as in the PHB. Of course there will be changes.
  • 10:23 PM - Matthia05718273 quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    A CR3 Archer from Volo's Guide to Monsters fires twice per round, and deals an average of 8 damage per hit. If the person advancing on them has a low AC, which a character in a Western setting will, they can take down an average-HP character from a 3rd level party in two turns - so, unless their opponent wins initiative and is close enough to close the distance in one turn, yes they can kill them before being punched in the face. I guess someone would counter by saying that a character would wear armor to close the difference. Meaning the rules solution to this problem is simply, make armor more cumbersome than it is (you can't close the distance as fast), or make it not as useful (the AC increase is not as good, especially compared to making yourself more dexterous). I gotta say this thread is a little exhausting to read. Hasn't CapnZapp already admitted that he thinks D&D can handle firearms, he just prefers different systems?
  • 05:43 PM - CapnZapp quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    CapnZapp I still feel that your argument that D&D favours moving to close in to melee rather than using cover feels more like theory crafting than actual gameplay practice. But even conceding that it might occur in standard D&D, I still don't see that it will be a factor in a Western setting. In a Western setting, ranged combat is king. Your primary damage dealers are pistols and rifles and shotguns, with things like knives and tomahawks coming in second and also being throwable. So, in this setting, where's the motivation to charge into melee? What purpose is there in a character running around in the open? Sure, the HP model may somewhat mitigate the downside of such a tactic, but what's the upside? Why wouldn't people make tactical use of range and cover in those circumstances? I'm afraid you need to go into specifics. As long as we just take "ranged combat is king" for granted, sure enough, there's little motivation to charge into melee. But how to accomplish the change? I'm sure y...
  • 02:59 PM - Oofta quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    @CapnZapp I still feel that your argument that D&D favours moving to close in to melee rather than using cover feels more like theory crafting than actual gameplay practice. But even conceding that it might occur in standard D&D, I still don't see that it will be a factor in a Western setting. In a Western setting, ranged combat is king. Your primary damage dealers are pistols and rifles and shotguns, with things like knives and tomahawks coming in second and also being throwable. So, in this setting, where's the motivation to charge into melee? What purpose is there in a character running around in the open? Sure, the HP model may somewhat mitigate the downside of such a tactic, but what's the upside? Why wouldn't people make tactical use of range and cover in those circumstances? There's a couple of problems with that in a D&D/fantasy setting. There are a lot of monsters that won't be stopped by a few bullets. That troll is going to laugh at you while it charges into combat to rip yo...

Monday, 24th June, 2019

  • 12:40 PM - Paul Farquhar quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    Thanks. XCOM is actually what specifically comes to mind for me. It's been a back-burner project for me for some time to make an XCOM based campaign, but I've never found a nice system to use, with ready-made modern weapons and armour, and a decent tactical combat system. Maybe once the forthcoming Stargate system is released, I'll try adapting that. Since Stargate is closely based on 5e I doubt it will be what you are looking for. I would see if you could hunt down Snapshot: http://wiki.travellerrpg.com/Snapshot
  • 08:35 AM - Paul Farquhar quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    Now that you mention it, while I've seen injury and death handled differently in a variety of systems, I can't think of any I've played that specifically support and encourage tactical ranged combat - and it's something I've occasionally looked for in a system. Is there a particular system that does it well? As I've mentioned, I've played Traveller and FASA Star Trek quite extensively, and I don't think they particulalrly encorage tactical ranged combat. I think once you get away from D&D tabletop RPGs tend to become less focused on combat full stop. Although the Starship Combat in Trek was awesome. Traveller did spawn the Snapshot skirmish rules that had action points and the like, but I think they where really too cumbersome for a fun tabletop game. However, the Rebel Star Raiders -> X-Com -> Shadowrun computer games are pretty much direct decedents. You basically need a computer to keep track of the cover, otherwise it's just not fun. I did read the Boot Hill rules a long time ago. If ...

Friday, 21st June, 2019


Thursday, 20th June, 2019

  • 07:54 PM - Umbran quoted MarkB in post Keanu in the MCU
    Ironically, if they successfully made a Fantastic Four movie that built upon the family dynamics, it would probably feel like an Incredibles knock-off. Which would make it two or three times better than the previous FF movies, so... win? We would have the point that it is more a family of siblings/peers, rather than strict parent/child, so it can be a little different.

Tuesday, 18th June, 2019

  • 08:58 AM - CapnZapp quoted MarkB in post If you could put D&D into any other non middle ages genre, what would it be?
    If both sides are using ranged weapons, then neither side is trying to get close. Instead, they're firing at each other from positions of cover in an extended ranged battle. Which is exactly like any typical Western movie.Except that would make the session suck, at least for me. You're painting a picture where everybody's mostly missing because everybody's AC is increased by cover. Not to mention how spectacularly unsuited 5th edition in particular would be with how it allows you to move, shoot, and move. You would always have to rely on your reaction, since everyone stays inside their house or whatever with full cover (no attack possible), except during their turn, when they move out, shoot, and move back out of sight again. But I'll give you that this wasn't what you had in mind, and so I won't discuss this particular scenario more. What I will say is, that sooner or later one hero will realize two things: 1) their crowbar or axe deals more or less the same damage as their revolver 2) t...


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