View Profile: Sepulchrave II - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
  • Sepulchrave II's Avatar
    Wednesday, 12th June, 2019, 01:34 AM
    DnD: 2E, 4E, 5E, PF. Yuk. Traveller: MT, TNE, T4, T5, GURPS, T20, Traveller 2300, 2320, MgT. The mechanics are all fiddly as hell, or inferior to - or just ported from - Classic Traveller, although there are plenty of ideas to mine. CT is the most awesome game ever, however, so there would be no point in playing any other version. I am also opinionated.
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  • Mark CMG's Avatar
    Sunday, 26th May, 2019, 05:07 PM
    Wisconsin lost a legend today . . . https://www.packers.com/news/packers-legend-bart-starr-dies-at-85
    167 replies | 10482 view(s)
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  • Mark CMG's Avatar
    Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019, 04:42 AM
    Steven Creech has passed. https://www.hshfuneralhome.com/notices/Steven-Creech https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/help-steve-creech-author-and-game-designer#/
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  • Sepulchrave II's Avatar
    Monday, 20th May, 2019, 03:34 PM
    • Literary • Creative • Artistic • Social • Theatrical • Mythopoeic • Collaborative • Therapeutic Etc. etc.
    1470 replies | 39136 view(s)
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About Sepulchrave II

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September 22, 1970 (48)
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Monday, 27th May, 2019


Saturday, 25th May, 2019


Monday, 20th May, 2019


Monday, 4th February, 2019

  • 12:31 PM - Quartz mentioned Sepulchrave II in post Feature or Bug: D&D's Power and Complexity Curve
    As a counter-example, remember the 3E Epic Level Handbook? I absolutely hated the bestiary in that book, because all the monsters were just bigger, but not any different, and that's super boring. It was a quantitative change but not a qualitative change. As a counter-counter example, look at some of the epic critters Sepulchrave II created for his Tales of Wyre.

Tuesday, 21st August, 2018


Thursday, 2nd August, 2018

  • 01:28 AM - pemerton mentioned Sepulchrave II in post A discussion of metagame concepts in game design
    Improving a language would require the language to use less words to accomplish higher levels of understanding. <snip> Adding words and phrases to a language, that can be misunderstood without appropriate context is not improvement.On this I tend to go with Orwell in his essay on Newspeak. More words allows nuance, rhythm, assonance, alliteration, etc. It increases the expressive power of the language. Reading on, I see that Sepulchrave II has said the same in reply. Also, on statistics and causation: scientific knowledge isn't limited to knowledge of causal processes. Statistically confirmed correlations may enable predictions to be made, even though the causal process that generates the correlation is not known. This is starting to push my knowledge of the history of science, but I would have thought that Mendelian genetics and 19th century statistical mechanics of gasses would be examples of scientific knowledge of correlations in ignorance of the actual causal process.

Tuesday, 31st July, 2018

  • 12:01 AM - pemerton mentioned Sepulchrave II in post A discussion of metagame concepts in game design
    The assertion that moral truth is a thing in the universe is contentious. "Thing in the universe" is not really a technical term, but if some form of meta-ethical expressivism of some form is correct, then it seems reasonable to deny that moral truth is a thing in the universe. The best argument I'm aware of that Sepulchrave II (and other minds in general) exist is a version of that developed by the late nineteeenth and twentieth century empiricists, and that takes the form of argument to best explanation - which is a mode of scientific argument, though not based on the sort of regimentation of observation that is characteristic of scientific enquiry. Similar structures of argument explain why inference to best explanation grounded in careful and regimented observation is the best path to knowledge. The soundness of these empiricist modes of argument is of course contested. But for the purposes of friendly conversation on a RPG message board, it can't be treated as obvious that scientific modes of explanation can't be used to explain the power of science, nor the existence of other minds.

Monday, 30th July, 2018

  • 11:58 AM - Ovinomancer mentioned Sepulchrave II in post A discussion of metagame concepts in game design
    This is a sweeping, unsupported, epistemological assertion; I can make those too, but it doesn't make them true. What "other things" did you have in mind which are not part of "our universe?" Sure. "Science, when is it okay to kill someone?" "Science, what is the best corporate tax rate?" "Science, prove Sepulchrave II is not a figment of my imagination." Or, "Science, prove that Science is the best means to discover truth." Now, I'm pretty sure they'll be handwaiving about the questions or that Science will on day figure all this out, but that's invalid because these are things in the universe, and you can't invoke non-scientific guesses about the future to justify science. That's self-defeating for the question - you're using not science to claim science is (will be?) right.

Tuesday, 15th May, 2018

  • 03:21 PM - Sadras mentioned Sepulchrave II in post What is *worldbuilding* for?
    For my own sake following here, how does this current discussion on encounter design/balance connect with the overarching discussion of what worldbuilding is for? Why oh why, would you want them to return to that topic!?? EDIT: Besides Sepulchrave II pretty much nailed it.

Monday, 17th July, 2017


Tuesday, 10th January, 2017


Thursday, 24th October, 2013

  • 05:12 AM - grodog mentioned Sepulchrave II in post Aeon (updated 10/9/14)
    I'm starting to think we should create a kickstarter for this thread to get it on the road again :) Now there's a nice idea! Hey Sepulchrave II would you consider something like that? :D edit: "You must spread some Experience Points around before giving it to Erevanden again." Someone help me out, please?

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Wednesday, 12th June, 2019

  • 06:52 PM - GrahamWills quoted Sepulchrave II in post Systems You'd Never Play after Reading Them
    DnD: 2E, 4E, 5E, PF. Yuk You certainly seem to be a glutton for self-punishment. You've carefully read through 4 versions of D&D, most of them three rulebooks+ each, and disliked each one. That seems a bit odd -- I'm curious about why you even bother? Why did your read the 5E books when you knew you'd dislike them?

Friday, 3rd May, 2019


Thursday, 2nd May, 2019

  • 04:28 AM - Maxperson quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Thanks for encapsulating your perspective. Taking that out of context that way is really immature. Given your earlier responses, though, I suppose I should have expected that. My bad.
  • 01:57 AM - Maxperson quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    The bigger problem is that the experience of "realistic-ness" is entirely subjective, and neither you nor Max can possibly be qualified to dictate the terms or context of someone else's subjective experience. It doesn't matter what they experience. They can experience it as a moon made of cheese and that won't change the fact that there was some amount of realism increase. The value each person places on the realism increase based their perception of it can very wildly. That there was a realism increase is set in stone. The even bigger problem is bound up in the initial premise of this thread. Reality is characterized by an infinite number of variables from which complex phenomena emerge. This is no problem at all. Realism =/= reality, so it doesn't have to take all of those, or even most of those into consideration. The fewer variables you account for, the smaller the realism increase.

Wednesday, 1st May, 2019

  • 03:56 PM - lowkey13 quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Almost. Systems in RPGs don't typically model things at all; they model ideas which we have about things. That's one problem. But ... and I don't mean to get all philosophical on you ... that's all we have. What? Unless you're trying to go all brain-in-a-vat, we have to agree that each of us has "ideas which we have about things" that we can model (whether it's good, or bad)- that's the basis of math, or physics, or computer simulations, or CGI, or even TTRPGs. We can do it more realistically (or whatever word you want to use there) or less, but saying that all we have are ideas about things doesn't mean that two people can't determine whether, for example, a given computer simulation more closely models reality. The bigger problem is that the experience of "realistic-ness" is entirely subjective, and neither you nor Max can possibly be qualified to dictate the terms or context of someone else's subjective experience. The even bigger problem is bound up in the initial premise of this thread. ...
  • 03:12 PM - lowkey13 quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    I’m not sure what the impediment to understanding is in this thread. 1. We make up systems in our heads so that we can represent certain phenomena in an exercise of shared imagination. 2. The systems are not empirically derived. We just make them up. We base them on “ideas” that we have about “things” in which we have no expertise: human recovery, medieval warfare, warp physics, mental illness – whatever. They are highly genre- and system-dependent. 3. These systems do not now become “realistic.” They are at best clumsy caricatures of a narrow selection of possibilities within the phenomena which we are representing. The insanity mechanic in Call of Cthulhu does not add realism to CoC. The disease mechanic in 1e does not add realism to D&D. The mustering out process in Traveller does not add realism to Traveller. The glory mechanic does not add realism to Pendragon. They are all little games which we play with our imagination in order to lend structure and emphasis. So I completel...
  • 03:26 AM - Maxperson quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    I’m not sure what the impediment to understanding is in this thread. 1. We make up systems in our heads so that we can represent certain phenomena in an exercise of shared imagination. 2. The systems are not empirically derived. We just make them up. We base them on “ideas” that we have about “things” in which we have no expertise: human recovery, medieval warfare, warp physics, mental illness – whatever. They are highly genre- and system-dependent. 3. These systems do not now become “realistic.” They are at best clumsy caricatures of a narrow selection of possibilities within the phenomena which we are representing. The insanity mechanic in Call of Cthulhu does not add realism to CoC. The disease mechanic in 1e does not add realism to D&D. The mustering out process in Traveller does not add realism to Traveller. The glory mechanic does not add realism to Pendragon. They are all little games which we play with our imagination in order to lend structure and emphasis. Except that th...

Sunday, 28th April, 2019

  • 02:11 AM - pemerton quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    When pemerton writes that adding a table for weapon deterioration does nothing to increase his sense of realism, I am inclined to take him at his word. Generally I agree with the thrust of your posts, but just wanted to come in on this given I was mentioned: I accept the proposition that weapons can deteriorate through use. I think there are a range of ways of introducing this into the fiction: mere background colour, as hawkeyefan suggested; as narrated consequence of failure in a system that permits that (Prince Valiant would be an example; so would Burning Wheel; so, I believe though not from experience but from posts in this thread, would be BitD); via a GM-side complication mechanic (which is how Cortex+ Heroic handles it); and via a randomisation mechanic annexed to the attack roll resolution process, which is what Maxperson seems to have in mind. Any of these might contribute to a sense of realism, depending on details of implementation. I think the lattermost is also often liable to det...
  • 12:58 AM - Maxperson quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    You continue to presuppose a priori what "realistic" means. It means different things to each of us. When pemerton writes that adding a table for weapon deterioration does nothing to increase his sense of realism, I am inclined to take him at his word. pemerton is one of the few people whose word I won't take on things like this. Not because I think he's lying, but rather because he's notorious for redefining terms to fit his needs and expecting others to either conform to them, or at least accept his personal definition. "I experience [the feeling of verisimilitude] more authentically than you because of [the rules which I favor]." On what basis do you declare an insight into something which I feel, and how can you measure it against your own subjective feelings? I think people are capable of recognizing reality in an imagined space, and if they can recognize reality when they "see" it, they can recognize shifts in it. It can't really be quantified for the reasons I've given, but th...

Saturday, 27th April, 2019

  • 11:01 PM - Maxperson quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    But in the example I give, Y is a subjective cognitive state, not a function of "reality." That's the point. There is no real "Y" which exists independently of the experiencer. But it is a shared imagined space and we all know what reality is. Therefore, we can all imagine that X will make Y shared imaged space more realistic. We may disagree on the amount of added realism, and/or the value of it, but it's not hard for us to understand what increased realism is for the imagined space we are sharing.
  • 04:39 PM - Maxperson quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Maxperson – my apologies. My previous posts were rather acidic. Thank you very much. :) Ironically, I suspect my actual play style hews closer to yours than, say, pemerton’s. But I think it's important to realize that every individual experience is unique; I cannot assert that “I experience [Y] more authentically than you because of [X].” This seems especially germane to any imaginative endeavour. I think that the unique experiences are where the subjectivity comes in. Lets say that X is more realistic than Y, but will person A may not think X is as realistic as person B does, and person B may not think it's fun, while person a might have a blast with it. I am fascinated by the idea of a “sub-reality” to the game – for want of a better term. Mechanical assumptions upon which the game world is built; it is what draws me to games such as Crusader Kings – a desire to crack the algorithms which underpin the universe. System mastery and resource management scratches an itch for me. And I ...

Wednesday, 24th April, 2019

  • 04:30 PM - lowkey13 quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Notions of realism are inapplicable in TTRPGs, the modi of which pertain to shared imaginary spaces. I’m not prepared to casually absolve someone of using the term realism just because “we understand what they mean by it.” It’s still an inappropriate word. Wow! Okay, you must be fun at parties. What, do you normally expect that people crave your absolution? Look, there is a desire to have some needed room for discussion, and this ain't it. It's roughly akin to someone quoting Drax from Avengers:IW ("I've mastered the ability of standing so incredibly still, that I become invisible to the eye") then someone else immediately goes into a long diatribe about how they aren't still, and can't be, because they are actually moving because they are on the Earth, which is moving, and in the solar system, which is moving, and in the Galaxy, which is moving, and there is no such thing as ever being still AND I WILL NOT ABSOLVE YOU OF USING AN INAPPROPRIATE WORD. Yeah, don't ever be that guy. On this realism...

Wednesday, 10th April, 2019

  • 12:57 AM - Lanefan quoted Sepulchrave II in post How to deal with death in RPG?
    When I referee a campaign, the death of a PC only ever comes at the explicit direction of the player; occasional one-shots might have a different paradigm. This has been my position since the 1980s; even in 1e, death was nothing more than a 5500gp inconvenience – so what’s the point? A 5,500 g.p. inconvenience*, plus the permanent loss of a Con point, plus the risk of failing your resurrection survival roll and ending up perma-dead...plus not getting a share of any xp earned while you're dead...yeah, dying in 1e did have its consequences. * - assuming a relatively whole corpse; otherwise resurrection became a 12,000 g.p. inconvenience if you could even find someone who could cast it. ------------------------------------------------- The one factor not yet mentioned regarding character death is this: in the rules system in use, how easily and-or quickly can you generate a replacement? A system where char-gen takes an hour or two would be far less amenable to frequent PC death, I think, than ...

Thursday, 4th April, 2019


Wednesday, 3rd April, 2019

  • 12:51 PM - Bedrockgames quoted Sepulchrave II in post A GMing telling the players about the gameworld is not like real life
    Most fatalities from punches being thrown are the result of people being knocked unconscious and hitting their skulls on concrete afterwards. Oregon ruled against regarding fists as deadly weapons in 1975, but the debate has come around again recently. Some jurisdictions consider hands and feet differently. E.g.: Emphasis mine. I am aware of this. I used to box. It is very dangerous to go around punching people for this reason. Again, wasn't minimizing the effect of punching and kicking someone. Still it is rare, which is why we tend not to regard unarmed attacks as lethal, but would regard a knife or gun as lethal.

Friday, 29th March, 2019


Thursday, 28th March, 2019

  • 04:36 PM - Ovinomancer quoted Sepulchrave II in post Chinese Government Burns Cthulhu RPG Print Run
    Maybe... but before offering them too much benefit of the doubt, there's a difference in them suppressing materials designed for their own market and suppressing materials being processed for foreign companies for a foreign market. They've usually been pretty compliant with American businesses exploiting their labor force and lax environmental regulations. Too much of this kind of behavior loses them business that will probably go to the next cheap country (like India or Vietnam). Kind of makes me wonder if there's an additional factor involved in this case.Really? This surprises you? Let's say that cocaine is legal in another country. Is it okay to produce cocaine in your country, so long as it is only for export to a country where it is legal? Laws rarely consider end-user of illegal activities because it's so hard to actually police who the end-users are. Suggesting that prior periods of Chinese history or alternate timelines might provide a better reality than the current communist utopia i...
  • 01:27 PM - Dioltach quoted Sepulchrave II in post Classic British television shows
    Blake's 7 - Sci-fi with 70s social values. Veering on camp but the actors are RADA graduates, so they get away with it and you get completely sucked in. I watched this again last year for the first time in literally 40 years. It is even more awesome than I remember. Fun fact: Steven Pacey, who played Tarrant in the last two series, narrates the audiobooks of Joe Abercrombie's First Law books.
  • 10:06 AM - Tonguez quoted Sepulchrave II in post Classic British television shows
    If you enjoy children's TV paired with altered states of consciousness, I recommend The Clangers, The Magic Roundabout and Mr. Benn. thats an apt description - I'd forgotten just how trippy some British childrens TV can get

Wednesday, 13th March, 2019



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