View Profile: Aldarc - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
Tab Content
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 01:07 PM
    Agreed - In the early game it was pasted on at a level that was too high... they were low impact in comparison to every single thing happening they were low level effects too little to late.
    55 replies | 966 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 12:55 PM
    One might postulate that the magic of oaths which affected characters even across the gulf of death was "Kings Magic" - I have a martial practice called Marshal Troops which arguably could be leveraged if one wanted a mechanical element for that plot fix but the dude saved up huge amounts of karma LOL. Kings magic is also asserted in story as to why using just a weed and simple handling which...
    55 replies | 966 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 12:44 PM
    And even talking animal languages was something anyone in that world could use or learn. The D&D ranger was spell using entirely because the games designers acted like it had no design space for non-magic using characters doing nice things which has been mentioned... so they had to have spells.
    55 replies | 966 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 PM
    Bingo But I bet some consider it a longer list and arguably could even include the Warlord (sort of). I am interested in hearing your take on the details.
    55 replies | 966 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Today, 12:13 PM
    Well, in a novel we don't know if it's "no matter what". We just know that, on this occasion, the villain got away. I think the difference between a novel and D&D or similar RPG is not "no matter what", but rather the different mode of authorship: in a novel there is (typically) one author who decides what happens in the fiction; whereas in D&D or a RPG we normally work that out via action...
    56 replies | 1702 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Today, 11:31 AM
    Fred Hicks (Evil Hat Productions) is good friends (and longtime gaming buddy) with Jim Butcher and the owner of Jim Butcher's official forums. ;)
    73 replies | 2207 view(s)
    1 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Today, 09:47 AM
    PHB p 32: Cleric combinations (with fighter types) may use edged weapons. Personally I'd probably also allow it with cleric/thieves and cleric/assassins. For cleric/MUs I'm not sure there's a lot at stake unless you want to be a darts-thrower.
    45 replies | 914 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Today, 09:44 AM
    I dunno the reason, but I assume it's related to their inability to use potions (PHB p 32): Magic items usable by monks include all magical varieties of weapons listed (unless proscribed), rings, and those miscellaneous magic items which are usable by thieves. No other magic items of any sort may be employed by monks. Holy water isn't mentioned, but I think it would fall under this same...
    45 replies | 914 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Today, 09:17 AM
    But also making them enemies of the living world and its continued existence. Because of the way they framed the Primordials (not as beings of nature and passion but as beings of elemental chaos) I can see why they didn't go down this path.
    74 replies | 3098 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Today, 09:15 AM
    Empire of the Petal Throne. The system is highly derivative of, but certainly not identical to, early D&D.
    13 replies | 286 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 07:08 AM
    I think the only question is should it be written specifying both enemies are marked by this trick.
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 07:05 AM
    And Aragorn became a Warlord with nature skills, martial practices or ritual magic (to cash in an oath marshalling troops and talk to animals and similar tricks not to cast spells like a wizard or druid when he finally hits name level ), also some wicked epic destinies.
    55 replies | 966 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 06:54 AM
    I think in real life spending time analyzing a path and estimating distances is a precursor to parkour
    27 replies | 798 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 06:15 AM
    Sounds interesting would be more so if every +1 was functionally more meaningful
    15 replies | 310 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Today, 12:57 AM
    Adding some thoughts to this: Marvel Heroic RP/Cortex+ Heroic is very much a scene-based game, to the extent that the way actions are declared and resolved depends upon whether the game is current in an Action Scene or a Transition Scene. Burning Wheel tends to be scene-based, although it doesn't quite have the formal mechanical architecture of (say) MHRP or 4e D&D or any version of D&D...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Today, 12:10 AM
    Tony Vargas normally whatever fighter I am building I want to think of how they deal with 2 enemies in basic attacks. (cleave,dual strike, slash and pommel) Cleave is good for a two handed weapon use... Dual strike is better for pretty much everything else but if you arent building up your off hand weapon at low levels where at wills are mostly used a Brawler might take slash and pommel but...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:44 PM
    The one i found treats them as single class but I think that the idea of having three classes might be in some ways better. Not sure I am ready to purchase it though. I both like and do not like, how the Battlemaster maneuvers are available beyond the boundaries of its class. But I think if other classes were designed around mixing and matching too that might make all the difference. It is...
    30 replies | 1274 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:46 PM
    There are quite a few powers and feats in support of the Str/wisdom and Str/con and Str/Dex builds I think we need a lot of these Str/Int ones actually.
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:42 PM
    This one may be more in the descriptor for controlling enemies tangents of attack so its named it to invoke Thibaults
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 PM
    Wow tell us how you really feel ;) To be honest on topic I didnt get to play the Tome of Battle characters. I have read it and was impressed both by the presented flavor and willingness to actually try and fix issues for martial style classes and the terminology well rocked. The battlemaster falls short sure and eldritch knight does even worse.
    30 replies | 1274 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:11 PM
    In the damage dealing category I like the skill connection akin to the ones requiring Endurance training not sure this is quite right (even though Healing is Wisdom in D&D land - Surgery seems Dex or Int).
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:55 PM
    NPCs usually get a defeated condition instead of dying. Only important distinction once in a while and you might specify it on the creature. A swarm which is defeated is like a defeated army they are scattered or in retreat depending on the quality of leadership) and maybe a diplomacy or intimidate might force them back together in a manner similar to a heal check.
    79 replies | 2507 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:53 PM
    Much like Maxperson, I like Bronze Age, early Iron Age, and Antiquity, but I think that most setting writers have a shallow historical grasp of these time periods beyond their aesthetics.* ("Look, here's a guy dressed like a Spartan hoplite fighting a minotaur!") And that's always disappointing to me. The same is probably true for D&D's relation to the Middle Ages. And other settings/systems do a...
    397 replies | 10707 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:21 PM
    No we're not. :p
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:19 PM
    The Producers.
    16 replies | 432 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:05 PM
    In 4e the Swarm is coordinating with one another and have attributes appropriately boosted so as to be a challenge for their effective combined level but that probably isn't good enough for non-combat arenas maybe for instance you will want more detail like an additional bonus on skilled actions that allow multiple characters to work on them such as using strength to lift something big with lots...
    81 replies | 3832 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:51 AM
    I don't think Paizo is under any delusions about catching lightning in a bottle twice, especially given the success of 5e. I suspect they are hoping that 2nd edition is a sustainable success while also being something fresh and new that they themselves enjoy playing with and designing for. They will probably hope that they get the majority of their playerbase from PF1, maybe some new players who...
    16 replies | 432 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:43 AM
    Sounds too inflexible 4e has examples but I would have like to have seen more. I think the idea actually needs more development.
    81 replies | 3832 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:15 AM
    Here is where I would advocate the use of Urban Shadows. Urban Shadows (and its use of the PbtA system) leans heavily into exploring through play the implications, complications, and satisfactions of "being" the supernatural (or the aware mundane). The playbook is meant to embrace the archetypes and such. From what I recall, there is a Sorcerer-esque aspect to this where you are deciding between...
    73 replies | 2207 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:17 AM
    I actively support the use of these mechanics both for roleplaying sensibility and mechanic ease. I do have to engage differing descriptions of defeat may decide different body counts depending on personalities of the group but hey that is fun and allows you to characterize the hoards differently.
    81 replies | 3832 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:38 AM
    Not sure parkour is the kind of ability i see as necessarily requiring a skill roll. I mean I see hero class parkour as climbing speed virtually unimpaired and overcoming speed impairment due to terrain.
    27 replies | 798 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 12:21 PM
    I don't think Bedrockgames is mistaken here. This sense of literary prose narration happening at you, with the players in more passive roles as an audience to GM performance, was present as far back as the OP of pemerton's thread that spawned this one. He is working from a definition or understanding that others had been using.
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Tuesday, 25th June, 2019, 12:19 AM
    I'm not too fussed what terms are used to draw the distinction that's at issue in this thread. I've been trying to follow the usage that seems to have been established. Hussar told me to use prose vs conversational, so I did. If I'm now meant to use formal vs informal, that's fine. Whatever terminology is used, I think there is a reasonably clear contrast between (i) the Saltmarsh text, which...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 05:58 PM
    Hmmm...I am not sure whether any hypothetical "D&D of urban fantasy" could delve into that sort of complexity well. It's not as if D&D is good for exploring the complexities and nuances of the European Middle Ages or Renaissance. D&D does a fairly shallow job of exploring anything beyond the objectification of monsters as a source of loot, XP, and the colonial moral superiority of the...
    73 replies | 2207 view(s)
    2 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 04:03 PM
    Agreed, but I think my post identifies some features of the Saltmarsh text that mark the contrast with conversational language. For instance, I think that conversatinal language - to the extent that, under some sort of regimentation, it has a main clause - is more likely to have the main clause correspond with the main body of information (eg It's a run-down bedroom with rubbish everywhere rather...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 03:23 PM
    In the context of the OP? I would say, yes, that appears to be the case: The underlying desire seems to be for something that does for urban fantasy what D&D does for pseudo-medieval fantasy, especially without the various lore/edition/setting baggage of WoD.
    73 replies | 2207 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 02:44 PM
    It is definitely Urban Fantasy, but the BitD setting is incredibly restrictive both in geographic scope (Duskvol) and its breadth of urban fantasy tropes. I don't think that one could readily use BitD for a generic urban fantasy game. It curtails itself to a fairly particular play experience. This is one of its strengths, but it can also work against its favor. This is how Modern AGE,...
    73 replies | 2207 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 02:29 PM
    He's using simpler language, but I don't think he is necessarily using simpler vocabulary. There is not much difference of vocabulary between "rubbish is scattered around what was once a fine guest bedroom" and "it's a run-down bedroom with rubbish scattered about." And we could hardly say that those differences amount to any notions of higher vocabulary: e.g., fine, guest, once, what, was....
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 08:52 AM
    But isn't that because the guest bedroom will look different from a currently occupied one. How can you tell that it was once a guest bedroom - rather than, say, an abandoned main bedroom? (I'm putting to one side the anachronism of projecting relatively modern architectural conceptions back into a house in the Greyhawk setting.) My first example changes word order and verb constructions and...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    1 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 12:44 AM
    Its narrative style in my view. I'd focus on phrases like "rubbish is scattered around what was once a fine guest bedroom" rather than, say, it's a run-down bedroom with rubbish scattered about; there is evidence of rodent infestation ratjher than, say, you can see rats or you can see mouse-droppings everywhere; "its woodwork is worm-ridden" rather than, say, there seem to be termites in the...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 12:30 AM
    A lot of authors and publishers seem to think so!
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Monday, 24th June, 2019, 12:23 AM
    This is also a major stumbling block for me. Of course word choice matters in communication. So does tone. Etc. Someone has given the example of sarcasm in this or some other recent thread, and that is often a matter of tone. That's all part-and-parcel of conversation.
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 04:12 AM
    You could play test the blue blazes out of it... and see if that inspires refinements.
    30 replies | 1274 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 03:10 AM
    i like this thinking its nice if you can do context overlap... how much value should that skill check be in combat?
    79 replies | 2507 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 02:04 AM
    So what options were leveraged in 4e to expand Martial further (Martial Practices could be on that list but were not fully developed)
    30 replies | 1274 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 01:25 AM
    Oh right very excellent tools. I still hack on the Character builder via CBLoader
    68 replies | 2225 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 01:21 AM
    One example I found http://blog.kittenhugs.com/2015/07/martial-adept.html
    30 replies | 1274 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 01:11 AM
    Not certain why you are asking... If a series of skill uses and each and every make or break the sequence that isn't a skill challenge they need to contribute not be barriers, if the skill uses are largely easy that isn't a skill challenge etc. Non-simplistic usually collaborative skill use where a composite failure results in a broad shift in the story in a direction that the players had not...
    7 replies | 389 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Sunday, 23rd June, 2019, 12:12 AM
    In another thread about traditional D&D vs 4e style @Manbearcat brought an example to the table where the fighter took over ie manhandled a tank into using it against the enemy OK it was basically an element I brought in... the point was to show that 4e had assumptions of competence and tools for accomplishing the extraordinary for non-magical characters at higher levels that were lacking in...
    7 replies | 389 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 11:56 PM
    I like it for being a way to make sure everyone gets to contribute in combat mechanically as often and climatically as others and in a way that syncs up with narrative with roles differentiating broadly how you contribute. Yup good design tool.
    51 replies | 2097 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 06:10 PM
    A couple of sources for this idea... one is Princess Bride LOL
    343 replies | 38374 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 06:06 PM
    Did I mention this thread is one of the reasons I want them to get the error fixed for moving threads.
    254 replies | 28079 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 06:03 PM
    Note you can level gate usage of a maneuver by saying it takes forgoing 2 attacks from your attack action.
    76 replies | 2565 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 05:58 PM
    I did indeed think of Action surge after typing the above
    76 replies | 2565 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 05:43 PM
    Indeed I think my idea was minions are great but all the monster roles are a very useful tool. I also think potential swarm size is underestimated. A tight phalanx containing a century of men might be 12x12 and quite appropriate to have 5 of those against a party in paragon. A group of soldiers might have both lose and tight formation training. (change their size) ... it might actually take...
    51 replies | 2097 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 05:18 PM
    Sure kind of but then the 4e fighter also had a daily in there. I think mayhaps the fighter needs more superiority dice to do the multi-dice cost trick. Or another resource like heroic surge to do daily class maneuvers with.
    76 replies | 2565 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 04:52 PM
    Did you try out swarms? Swarms are the real go to for mass combat... a swarm/squad of 10 fight to the death fanatics may be 1 elite enemy or 10 minions but that elite enemy might also be 100 normal soldiers in a tighter 8x8 formation with a leader who has them retreat after it becomes obvious they are out matched or perhaps it is a disorganized mob whose fighting style costs them more lives...
    51 replies | 2097 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 03:34 PM
    I got blocked by him when I didn't roll over when he argued that Fate wasn't roleplaying game. (His issue also had to do with metagaming. ;))
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 03:24 PM
    Simple enough explanation: Multiple perspectives breed multiple opinions. I'm not going to bother though with rehashing the he-said/she-said of that thread here. If we are moving towards a more mutual and amiable understanding, then good. That's what matters. But that is again why I said that we could replace the vocabulary with simpler vocabulary - e.g., "unpredictability," "twenty-three,"...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 03:37 AM
    I don't think that "vocabulary IS the important distinction between conversational and prose language," but that does not mean that I am arguing "pretty vehemently, all the way along that vocabulary choice doesn't matter." This was also not true on the other thread either. (In fact, I'm not sure if there was anyone on the other thread who believed otherwise.) This latter point is a false position...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    3 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 01:54 AM
    Hussar, I would strongly appreciate it if you would stop constructing strawman arguments with my name attached and insisting that I am strongly saying anything that we both know you can't back up with evidence. It's rude and you're being a dick. Thankfully, I'm confident that Bedrockgames will exercise more sense than to bite at your misrepresentations of what I have said.
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 01:32 AM
    I do not get the sense of magic.... in this at all :) though science was a philosophy and chemistrity an evolution of alchemy so there is that.
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 01:17 AM
    Perhaps refine those?
    30 replies | 1274 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 12:53 AM
    Excuse you? Revisionist history much? No you didn't. You still haven't now, Hussar.
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Saturday, 22nd June, 2019, 12:07 AM
    What do you do if you have a player who doesn't like evocative narration???
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 11:24 PM
    I'm not really seeing any actual argumentative connection between saying "word choice matters" to "ergo conversational style is invalid" or "ergo evocation narration is best."
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 11:13 PM
    Another quote that reinforces the Intelligence foundation "The mind of the period Spaniard was also educated in matters of science.In various schools and universities, they learned about the philosophies of the ancient Romans and Greeks from the Marannos (Converted Jews).Matters of mathematics and geometry were taught by the Mariscos " From another source. "It was the belief of both...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 11:11 PM
    Your circle and their circle are both involved. https://www.martinez-destreza.com/articles/demystification-spanish-school-part-ii The definitions of Box you gave are pretty new ( the reference to a container seems older ) the name pugilist and similar from Greek era is based on fist. But according to my source/sources I think either my father or my martial arts teacher I think they...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 05:01 PM
    I think that is worth emphasizing control of space and distance around you and your adversaries seems a feature of this style (another reason this feels like a 4e fighter not a rogue). I am thinking it kind of relates to why boxing is called boxing. Perhaps forcing a blade lock that "grabs" an enemy may be good it captures them and forces them to remain within your "circle".
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 02:37 PM
    Dresden Files also has been updated several years ago as Dresden Files Accelerated, using Fate Accelerated but PbtA-like playbooks called "Mantles". There is also Modern AGE by Green Ronin, which uses a modified version of the AGE system from their other games (e.g., Dragon Age, Titansgrave, Fantasy Age, Blue Rose, etc.), but set in a modern setting. I believe that fantasy add-ons are also...
    73 replies | 2207 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 01:21 PM
    Just like in the other thread, you continually failed (miserably) to demonstrate that words like "wield" are non-conversational or "a deliberate word choice for a fantasy RPG." IMO, the phrase "wielding a gun", for example, is conversational language. I had even demonstrated that you can have prose with a young child's vocabulary while others indicated that some people exercise a larger...
    181 replies | 4252 view(s)
    0 XP
  • pemerton's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 11:57 AM
    Can you explain what you mean by framing sans narrative? Here's a link to an account of a fairly recent session I played of a humorous RPG (The Dying Earth). There was framing. I don't know whether or not it counts as "sans narrative".
    1473 replies | 42858 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 03:23 AM
    Admittedly breaking a swarm is less about killing the whole membership and it should be described rather differently
    81 replies | 3832 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 03:01 AM
    Is it cheating to say in 4e the 11th level fighter could handle a level 13 or 14 swarm containing 100 typical guard class soldiers but that it would play more interestingly? Than the drudge work?
    81 replies | 3832 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 01:10 AM
    That seems much more straightforward than the level 1 Feature of the Savant as it isnt worrying about which type of armor they are wearing - I will say thumbs up. Something I have been noticing that it is appropriate to do bonus damage keeps it a secondary attribute and it makes it a bit stikery but that is ok but I do want ot emphasize controlling the space around them ... a bit of...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 08:37 PM
    Hence why I don't find myself coming up with good solutions for those. Getting more surges means not only having that staying power in combat but also an extra amount of effort you can apply to skill challenge use of a skill or to a martial practice. It could be seen as fuel for ALL the other skills and not really needing other skill related value. 5e Con keeps on keeping on for giving more...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 08:32 PM
    Rogue had an at-will that let you shift INT distance and basically disappear the Shadowy Rogue might even be THE batman rogue build instead of the Ninja as I have been calling it. That was a fully functional build if you wanted an Intelligent Secondary type. I posted a loose example but now that I think about it instead of building a fencer flavor I need to make it batman with shuriken. I...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 08:21 PM
    They'll spam you just like they said they would They'll spam you when you're trying to go home And they'll spam you when you're there all alone But I would not feel so all alone Everybody must get spammed
    39 replies | 3735 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 04:55 PM
    Compare to Wisdom however which got way too much AND strength and con got only 1 a piece. While I would still change Dungeoneering to Engineering and make it intelligence based - that wouldn't help anything else. Arcana as a skill feels like its "just for magical types" subjectively I suppose it makes 3 feel like 2. But is a component of multi-classing (or making a hero who senses and...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 02:01 PM
    Yes that is less of an issue in 4e, potentially at least for saves and armor class using quick predictive thinking (Int) is enabled for those in a solid way. Some I have seen advocate bringing back Fort/Ref/Wil for 5e instead of having mostly unused saves. Perhaps they could allow initiative based on intelligence. While in 4e the foundation of value "in combat" is covered, they could have...
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 12:59 PM
    That's a helluva a lot of damage reduction, especially against a Tier 1 party. I don't think that's a game design issue, but, rather, a GM encounter design one. Both of which seem like an adventure design issues. Which is naturally a problem. Characters should also start play with cyphers. Maybe. There are other Cypher System games also produced by MCG that marginalize the need for...
    8 replies | 535 view(s)
    2 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 11:18 AM
    Much better possibility than I thought actually (but it binds a lot of flavor things things like spell casting and a pet into the class too); The savant is closer but has a bad bad thing it takes all the way to level 6 before getting Brains over Brawn. (making it fundamentally Mad for basic functions ie attacking up until that point err oops)
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 04:43 AM
    And a custom encounter power for the The Intelligent Fighter I considered making it against Reflexes.
    51 replies | 1793 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 03:33 AM
    Everybody must get spammed...
    39 replies | 3735 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Thursday, 20th June, 2019, 03:30 AM
    The idea was rather popular during the play testing if I recall. Another cost that we see in 5e is forgoing an attack ie conglomerating an attack it could take 2 of your attacks. You proabably do not do anything but this on your turn... without an action surge or something (maybe ok at really high level to do another attack) I would estimate you shouldn't be able to do it till 5e level 8...
    76 replies | 2565 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 11:40 PM
    Their design philosophy seems to be a game of mother may I See I can fail too.
    76 replies | 2565 view(s)
    1 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 09:11 PM
    Ah good call I noticed it first in the Players Handbook never saw any of the supplements but it was very evocative even the bits in the PHB. When the PHB mentions Belisarius it makes my face light up.
    68 replies | 2225 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 08:49 PM
    YES the number of fighters is not even interesting to me
    81 replies | 3832 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Garthanos's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 08:30 PM
    Yup
    81 replies | 3832 view(s)
    0 XP
  • Aldarc's Avatar
    Wednesday, 19th June, 2019, 04:09 PM
    How about word count in system dedicated to explaining grappling as one axis?
    62 replies | 2383 view(s)
    0 XP
More Activity
About Aldarc

Basic Information

Date of Birth
January 19, 1985 (34)
About Aldarc
Location:
Vienna, Austria
Disable sharing sidebar?:
No

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
3,111
Posts Per Day
0.50
Last Post
The urban fantasy market seems awfully stagnant Today 11:31 AM

Currency

Gold Pieces
2
General Information
Last Activity
Today 01:09 PM
Join Date
Wednesday, 12th June, 2002
Home Page
none
Product Reviews & Ratings
Reviews Written
0

8 Friends

  1. 76512390ag12 76512390ag12 is offline

    Member

    76512390ag12
  2. Afrodyte Afrodyte is offline

    Member

    Afrodyte
  3. darkbard darkbard is offline

    Member

    darkbard
  4. Garthanos Garthanos is offline

    Member

    Garthanos
  5. Lord Mhoram Lord Mhoram is offline

    Member

    Lord Mhoram
  6. Mark CMG Mark CMG is offline

    Member

    Mark CMG
  7. pemerton pemerton is offline

    Member

    pemerton
  8. TheCosmicKid TheCosmicKid is offline

    Member

    TheCosmicKid
Showing Friends 1 to 8 of 8
Page 1 of 18 1234567891011 ... LastLast

Thursday, 27th June, 2019


Wednesday, 26th June, 2019


Tuesday, 25th June, 2019



Page 1 of 18 1234567891011 ... LastLast
Page 1 of 8 12345678 LastLast

Monday, 24th June, 2019

  • 09:10 PM - Manbearcat mentioned Aldarc in post The urban fantasy market seems awfully stagnant
    ...st Girl treats all monsters as essentially vampiric in nature, even if they feed on abstract concepts like dreams and anger. I'm interesting in analyzing what makes these monsters tick in our minds. What makes the different varieties of vampires identifiable as vampires? What makes the different werewolves identifiable? For example, both Vampire: The Masquerade and Feed use the internal struggle between humanity and vampirism as a thematic conflict. Werewolves are liminal beings, existing between human and animal yet gaining supernatural insight and knowledge from this. I'm interested in exploring less popular and more esoteric ideas. For example, The Everlasting had original concepts for sin-eating gargoyles and immortal grail questers among others. Monsterhearts has a wide variety of both official and fan-made "skins" representing metaphors for humanity, like an ice queen with literal ice powers (The Frozen) or a kid whose "imaginary" friend is all too real (The Shadow). I'm with Aldarc here. I don't think the answer is a single general use Urban Fantasy TTRPGing system with theme/premise-neutral mechanics to rule them all (this almost always leads to an overwhelming GM presence in play trajectory to manufacture an experience...typically putting players in a significantly more passive position than in a game like Blades in the Dark). This is precisely why I brought up Blades in the Dark. I think the answer is MORE niche Urban Fantasy TTRPGing systems with encoded theme/premise and a holisitic approach to system (all mechanics, reward cycles, ethos, participant authority) that relentlessly focuses on producing an emergent fiction and participant experience around those things.
  • 08:52 AM - pemerton mentioned Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    ...ause ("rubbish is scattered about") that is, as far as information is concerned, of secondary interest. The clause what was once a fine guest bedroom is the main information-bearing clause from the point of view of describing what's there. The mismatch between syntactic structure and informational structure is a stylistic device. My contrasting formulation - it's a run-down bedroom with rubbish scattered about - aligns the syntax with the information: the syntactically main clause is also the main information-bearing clause, while the bit about rubbish is reduced to an adjectival phrase. It's that, not the extremely modest vocabulary change (ie my example replaces was once fine with is run down and drops the "guest" because I don't see how the past use of a bedroom as a guest bedroom is knowable by mere visual inspection), that makes my reworking less "narrative" and more conversational. The analysis I've just offered might also be relevant to the ongoing exchange between Imaro and Aldarc (? I think, haven't gone back to check) about what a conversational style might actually look like.

Sunday, 23rd June, 2019

  • 02:09 AM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    LOL. So, essentially, all Saelorn is seeing of this thread is Bedrockgames talking to himself? Unless Imaro somehow avoided the block hammer. ROTFLMAO. That has to be the WEIRDEST thread to see. :D :lol: Ok, so, yeah, Aldarc and Bedrockgames, I'd put things like diction, organization, that sort of stuff, under the umbrella of "presentation". How you get the information from A to B, rather than the content of that information itself. Now, at that point, sure, I can see a more conversational style being one way of doing it. Less formal, less formulaic. And, again, it's going to really, really depend on the game you are playing. Some games will necessitate a more "narrative" style just to evoke particular moods and tones. I just find that when I do that, and don't work from well structured notes (or boxed text) I forget stuff. I miss details. The other issue I have is pacing. Which, honestly, is my own bugaboo. As someone running the game, I want to get as much information into the player's hands as quickly and efficiently as possible. Which means that I need to organize narration to avoid questions from the players. If I get all the information to them, they won't need to ask many questions...

Saturday, 22nd June, 2019

  • 02:35 AM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Hussar, I would strongly appreciate it if you would stop constructing strawman arguments with my name attached and insisting that I am strongly saying anything that we both know you can't back up with evidence. It's rude and you're being a dick. Thankfully, I'm confident that Bedrockgames will exercise more sense than to bite at your misrepresentations of what I have said. Wait, what? So, vocabulary IS the important distinction between conversational and prose language? Now I'm really confused. Frankly Aldarc, I'm really having trouble parsing your argument through the snark. Could you please, in simple terms, outline what your argument actually is then? Because, honestly, I wasn't trying to misrepresent anything. I honestly believed that you were arguing that vocabulary did not matter.
  • 01:38 AM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    See, ok, Bedrockgames, but, what you're talking about is vocabulary choice. Fair enough. But, Aldarc has insisted, pretty vehemently, all the way along that vocabulary choice doesn't matter. And, you have never contradicted him. So, are you disagreeing with Aldarc? It appears that you are, but, I want to be very sure. It's not about "blurring dualities". It's that your side of the argument isn't quite as clear as you might think. It's confusing. You're saying that vocabulary matters. Aldarc is very strongly saying that vocabulary doesn't. So, which is it? Now, me, I think I agree with you - vocabulary matters. Now, you don't think there's much value in using an extended vocabulary - that you "don't use big adjectives". Fair enough. That's where you and I disagree. I think that most DM's actually do slip into "big adjectives", mostly subconsciously, depending on what game you happen to be playing. But, Aldarc would say that we're both wrong and that "big adjectives" ISN'T what delineates conversation from boxed text. And, frankly, if vocabulary isn't the delineati...

Thursday, 13th June, 2019

  • 02:45 PM - Imaro mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    I do the same thing actually. But this reasoning doesn't make much sense to me. The presentation is the same, you are just interpreting the presentation differently based on a mechanic. However I think we are getting pretty far afield of the crux of the debate. It really isn't about whether one is more important than the other. It is more about what kind of delivery/presentation/description people want. Some of us want a style that is natural, doesn't affect the manner or techniques of novel writing, some of us do want a more literary style of description. We've debated the meanings of these various terms. But I think if we make an attempt to understand the key difference arising, it centers around what kind of descriptions do you want from the GM and do you want them to be more or less literary (i.e. should they be evocative, sound like novel prose, employ literary techniques, etc or should they be more conversational and plain spoken). @Aldarc 's post above yours is definitely about which is more important... And contrary to what you've been saying it's been framed like that by quite a few posters in this thread. EDIT: Emphasis mine... IMO this would have been a much more interesting discussion topic

Monday, 10th June, 2019

  • 12:19 AM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...ly established as part of the lexicon. Same with gaunt or sunken eyes when describing inhuman, otherworldly things. I would expect that certain words would be more common when playing D&D and others would be more common when playing Call of Cthulhu and still others when playing Marvel Super Heroes. Use of the word “psychic” in an X-Men campaign, for example....it’s not a common word heard in conversation, but it’ll certainly come up when talking about the X-Men. Again, use of adjectives isn’t what I’m talking about. They’re descriptive by nature. I would agree with you that sometimes one choice of word can be more creative than another. I think this can happen even when it’s not the focus of the speaker/writer. I think such examples are a bit tangential to the idea of craft. The question I guess would be, "why"? Psychic in an X-Men game of course would be common, as it would likely be a game defined term. Like "to-hit" or "githyanki" or "humanoid" really. But, where Aldarc gets it wrong, is that we're talking about situational language that makes sense in context. Obviously there are going to be all sorts of jargon terms in any specialized and stylized conversation. Listen to two baseball fans going at it and they're not even really speaking English anymore. :D But, we're talking about the other language choices. "Wield", "intricately", "gaunt" etc. There are plain conversation versions of these words and phrases, but, they are being left behind in favor of more colorful language. Why? As soon as you start injecting things like "eldritch" and whatnot, you're leaving conversation behind and moving along the scale.
  • 12:10 AM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...e just making assumptions now...also I didn't say I preferred 1 over 2. I said 1 has more information, and there are definitely more analytically minded players who don't care about the flavorful description as much as they care about the info. And I don't think they are a small minority in our hobby. That said, you are right, these two descriptions are both pretty conversational, not literary. So the example is a bit puzzling anyways. Example two is just a bit vague. Again, I don't think this argument makes a whole lot of sense. We are talking about a conversational medium. Literary doesn't really seem like it would apply. you can try to run a game in a literary style. but I don't think it is necessary. Nor do I think it is particularly advisable. This is why I don't think we're as far apart as it might appear. I look at words like "intricately" and I think "literary" not "conversation" because the words "intricately carved" would almost never appear in a conversation. Aldarc above talks about a mechanic using technical language. Thing is, that's not really a conversation either. That's a mechanic imparting information to the customer, but, it's probably mostly one direction and if the mechanic dives too far into technical jargon, there's no conversation at all as the listener has no idea what's being talked about. Is it "literary"? Maybe not. But, it's certainly not conversation either. Aldarc keeps pressing me to prove that the language is literary. I'm not because the definition of "literary" is so nebulous. I don't have to. I only have to show that it isn't conversational to show that pemerton is wrong. And I CAN show that because the language that's being chosen, often deliberately chosen, is being chosen to evoke specific reactions and is language that would almost never appear in a conversation.

Sunday, 9th June, 2019

  • 07:33 PM - Imaro mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Let me ask a question to pemerton, Hawkeye, Bedrockgames and Aldarc. Would you use the same words/language/etc. to describe a remote village in the mountains for say a Ravenloft campaign vs a Four color superhero game like Icons? let's assume good faith in that the Icons village isn't supposed to be haunted or anything tht would make it more Ravenloft-esque.... EDIT: Meant hawkeyefan ...
  • 02:25 PM - pemerton mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Maybe because you have not made any assertions which are (a) sufficiently concrete for falsification testing (Karl Popper style)Popper has a (controversial) theory of what makes a claim, or perhaps a collection of claims, scientific. I'm not making a scientific claim. I'm making an aesthetic claim. So Popperian falsifiability has nothing to do with it. My claim is about the point of RPGing, what makes it a distinctive and worthwhile creative endeavour. Not far upthread Aldarc has given a pretty good account of my claim, so I'll add a few glosses to that. I am saying that entertainment in virtue of quality narration and performance is not what makes RPGing a distinctive and worthwhile creative endeavour. Rather, it's situation and resulting inhabitation and protagonism. I've said why I think this: because quality narration and performance are the weakest elements of the typical RPG experience (given the ready availability to most RPGers of genuinely quality narrations and performances), whereas protagonism in the context of engaging situation is the distinct thing that RPGs offer. When Hussar and Imaro say that they would quit games with ordinary-language descriptions because they'd find them too boring, my thought in response is that those games must have weak situations, or GMs who don't facilitiate protagonism. After all, both experience and reading lead me to think there's plenty of that going around. To elaborate on that last point: Hussa...

Saturday, 8th June, 2019

  • 07:54 AM - pemerton mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Equivocation requires intent. It's an attempt to conceal the truth, which requires the intent to conceal the truth, or to avoid committing, which requires the intent to avoid committing. There's no way around it. A wrong conclusion is just a wrong conclusion without other intent to change things.As I posted upthread, I don't know what your field is. I don't know how many logic or philosophy seminars you have attended. But the standard word used to describe a fallacious or sophistic argument that superficially appears valid, but in fact is not valid because a key term carries different meanings in different sentences of the argument, is equivocation. And the cognate verb is equivocate. That is what Bedrockgames and Aldarc are talking about. The fact that you don't notice that you're doing it doesn't make your argument any more valid.

Friday, 7th June, 2019

  • 04:21 PM - pemerton mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...it doesn't interfere with the narrative flow and enjoyment of the game. The scene should be presented therefore in terms relative to the character's abilities . . . Players who want to climb onto your coffee table and jump across your living room to prove that their character could jump over the chasm have probably missed the whole point of the story. Commenting on this, Ron Edwards says that "I can think of no better text to explain the vast difference between playing the games RuneQuest and HeroQuest." Which is to say, there are some systems which make enginnering or cartographical precision central to resolution, but there are others that don't. Certainly establishing a call to action doesn't depend upon any general uniformity or specificity of imagination. I think it does require estagblishing the situation by reference to the resolution mechanics - the plaeyrs can't answer the call if they don't know, in general terms, how their characters might fare. Which goes back to Aldarc's point some way upthread: RPGs have ways of establishing the emotinal "heft" of situations that are quite different from the sort of evocative composition or performances that other creative endeavours rely upon In my 4e game, for instance, if the players are committed to confronting Orcus, and I - as I did, following a successful knowledge check by the Sage of Ages - tell them his stats, then the players respond with the apposite awe, fear, etc. I don't need to evoke, by deft narration, a sense of how terrible Orcus is. The stats do that work. Of course different systems open up and close down different sorts of possibiities in this respect. For instance, in MHRP/Cortex+ Heroic it is the state of the Doom Pool, as much as the stats of any individual antagonist, that conveys the significance of the present situation. And in Dungeon World or Apocalypse World antagonists don't quite have "stats" in the way they do in D&D or Cortex+, and so system conveys heft in different ways, sch a...
  • 06:10 AM - Lanefan mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    I think it's possible to describe a situation without "painting a picture" in the literary sense. If I can't engage the players unless I "paint a picture" in the literary sense, then I worry that it's probably not a very good situation. You still need to paint the picture and make it all clear somehow, even if the players are already fully engaged. Why? Because if you don't you'll end up with players imagining or "seeing" the same situation in completely different ways both from each other and (worse) from you the DM, and reacting to it based on their own interpretation of what you-as-DM said. I've had this happen numerous times both as DM and player, where I (or the DM) wasn't clear enough and a player (or I) had a character react in a way that made perfect sense to the player but none at all to the DM: the DM - be it me or someone else - simply wasn't painting a clear enough picture and the player had the character act based on wrong info.
  • 12:12 AM - pemerton mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Now there is a zifnarb in your building. What do you do?Whow know? Tell me what it is. If you think telling me what it is necessarily requires literary effort, then what's your conception of teaching children the language? At some point in time, you have to drop the analogies and actually describe what's going on, directly. And, if you want to have any hope of hooking the players, you need to use at least some evocative language. Unless your game consists of nothing but retreaded material, where the context is already set, you need to actually paint that picture for the player. I think it's possible to describe a situation without "painting a picture" in the literary sense. If I can't engage the players unless I "paint a picture" in the literary sense, then I worry that it's probably not a very good situation. EDIT: Having read on, I see that Aldarc has made much the same points upthread. Also, I've spent far, far too long dealing with non-native English speakers who do not share our culture to take any description for granted. Every single reference you've made presumes a native English speaker (or near native anyway) with a deep grounding in western Judeo-Christian culture. As soon as you lose that background, none of your allegorical explanations are going to work. Imagine teaching D&D to ten year olds and you're trying to reference Men In Black - a 20 year old movie they've likely never seen. As hawkeyefan has said, what does this have to do with literary quality?

Thursday, 6th June, 2019

  • 08:28 AM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Not me. I learned my lesson last time. Nice Zifnarb. Niiiiiice Zifnarb. Here's some loot for you. Heh, you joke, but, the point is still there. Aldarc relied on comparisons - a warhorse to a Lamborghini to make the point. Or comparing the monster to the monster at the end of Men in Black. Only problem is, that presumes that the listener actually knows what you're talking about. If someone hasn't seen Men in Black or isn't a car person, then these comparisons fall flat. You wind up with a Darmok and Jelad in Tenagra situation. At some point in time, you have to drop the analogies and actually describe what's going on, directly. And, if you want to have any hope of hooking the players, you need to use at least some evocative language. Unless your game consists of nothing but retreaded material, where the context is already set, you need to actually paint that picture for the player. Sure, "There's a bomb" is going to get a reaction. We all know what a bomb is. "There's a bakudan" isn't really telling anyone anything, unless they happen to speak the language. At which time, you have to break out your wordsmithing anvil and ...

Tuesday, 4th June, 2019

  • 01:30 PM - pemerton mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...ell-known genre territory, you need to build that context into the game so that it becomes familiar. This can be all the GM's job or it can be shared by everyone (collaborative world building).Well this certainly gets to the heart of it, or to the heart of something at least. I see two related questions. (1) Is worldbuilding done, and context established, for the players? That depends on the system and the table. My experience, going back over 30 years to my early years as a GM, is that players are more invested when the context is something that they have a hand in. This can be as simple as PC backstory that establishes a mentor/master. And this is something that can be done conversationally. For a somewhat formalised/proceduralised version see eg Fate Core, or PtbA games. But informal approaches have been used for a lot longer than those games have been around. (2) Does establishing context, and the resulting "pull to action", depend on evocative language/wordcraft? Like Aldarc not too far upthread, I tend to think that it doesn't. If the context is something that the GM delivers to the players, then maybe evocative language is required to get them to buy in. As I posted early in this thread, I think this makes the success of the enterprise rest on the weaker rather than stronger aspect of the game form (ie it depends on one participant's literary capcity, rather than on the shared generation of fiction which, as I see it, is at the heart of post-dungeoncrawling RPGing). But when the players help supply the context then I think the emotional investment comes from inside rather than outside (to return to a metaphor I used a while ago upthread). I've been thinking about some comments that appeared some pages back (around page 90, I think) regarding the importance of evocative descriptions in the game. Instead of just calling out die rolls and watching the hit points go down, it's helpful to describe the action from the perspective of the characters. I...

Monday, 3rd June, 2019

  • 02:46 PM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...you are using it here almost interchangeably with other meanings. However, it has been my point ever since you misused your terms and repeated the categorical error. The problem is, while you are having this discussion about using different terms from different media, that's never actually been the point. Who cares if these things appear in cinema or whatever? It doesn't matter. The point is, none of these elements EVER appear in conversation. pemerton's basic point has been that it's the conversation of an RPG - the back and forth, plain language conversation during the game that drives the action and it's the situations and the content of the conversations that drives the emotional connection. Thing is, I've just shown that to be pretty much wrong. All the context of an RPG comes from the "not content" side of the equation. That's the side that Pemerton labeled "Literary". As in wordcraft, which, well, includes things like world building and whatnot. Like I said, Aldarc, I couldn't give a fetid dingo's kidney what you want to call it. It's really NOT the point. The point is, that it's NOT THE CONTENT side that drives the emotional connection of the game alone. It's the content IN CONJUNCTION WITH the literary (stuff that's not just content) that drives an RPG. That the stuff that's Not Content also appears in other media doesn't matter. IOW, I do not care that you can apply these same terms to other media. It doesn't matter because that's never been what I'm talking about with pemerton. You've gone off on your own little side thing here, and all you've done is cloud the issue.
  • 01:49 PM - Hussar mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...harshly with even redder ink pen. Several flaws with your epiphany is that (1) you are equating the creation of context with the creation of literary text, and as part of that (2) you are repeating your categorical error that this narratological aspect of worldbuilding for RPGs represents a literary conceit. I'm not even sure if it constitutes a "conceit." A ltierary conceit is typically an extended rhetorical device. In contrast, worldbuilding is a process for creating or establishing the narrative context through an imagined world of fiction. (FICTION =! LITERARY.) I would say that world building is very much part of the literary creation process. In that you cannot really have literature without world building, or at the very least, setting creation. Yes, it's also done in movies and, well, any narrative form, true, but, remember, the contrast here ISN'T between literary and narrative. The contrast here is between literary and CONVERSATION. That's always been the problem Aldarc. You are arguing against something that has never been the point. The contrast, right from the opening of this whole thread has been between the "literary" and the "conversational" where it is the content of the situation that drives emotional connection, NOT anything to do with the literary. That these literary elements also appear in other media is beside the point because we're not contrasting different forms of media. Now, would you say that world building has any place in conversation?

Wednesday, 29th May, 2019

  • 08:58 PM - hawkeyefan mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    Once you have the very basics, every things else is optional. I hate to snip so much of your interesting post....but I think I agree with most of it, and it can be boiled down to this bit above. What are the basics? Are there any that would apply to all of the myriad games you cited? Or most? Most is probably the best that can be hoped for. I think this is what Imaro and Aldarc have touched on. You had mentioned imagination, and I'd agree. I added buy in or willingness. What else can we list as core to the RPG experience?
  • 01:47 AM - pemerton mentioned Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    And the author of the OP?What about me? Do you mean, what did I hope to get out of the thread? One's never sure in advance beyond "interesting conversation". But the discussion about storytelling and various modes, driven mostly by Aldarc and hawkeyefan, has been interesting. Hriston and darkbard have helped refine my framing of my point. That's helpful. And also led it in the direction of "advice to GMs", which led to some fruitful discussions with uzirath whom I've not engaged with very much before as a poster. And Manbearcat has pushed with some challenging posts about pacing that I haven't replied to yet. Ultimately, the reason I post on a discussion board is to have discussions.


Page 1 of 8 12345678 LastLast
No results to display...
Page 1 of 101 123456789101151 ... LastLast

Wednesday, 26th June, 2019

  • 03:54 PM - Jer quoted Aldarc in post The urban fantasy market seems awfully stagnant
    I also recommend Dresden Files Accelerated. I'm not a fan of Dresden Files as a franchise, but I have found its system good for creating a fairly generic urban fantasy setting. I suspect that's because the Dresden Files franchise is as close to "generic urban fantasy setting" as you can get. And I don't meant that as a knock - I personally love the Dresden Files - but that Butcher has basically created a series that is as close to "D&D fantasy" as a genre as the urban fantasy genre gets. His world is basically a "kitchen-sink" world of fantasy and horror tropes - much like the assumptions of a "core" D&D setting is a kitchen-sink of fantasy tropes. He doesn't come up with cutesy-clever names for his creatures, letting vampires be vampires, werewolves be werewolves, wizards be wizards, and faeries be faeries, and mostly doesn't play the "everything you know about X is wrong" game with the monsters either. (The one example I can think of off the top of my head is the various vampire cou...

Monday, 24th June, 2019

  • 07:52 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Aldarc in post The urban fantasy market seems awfully stagnant
    Saturn bases aren’t bad. Where I get confused is why there’s a need to go so far beyond urban fantasy. Scifi and cyberpunk are present from the start.Sci-fi for two of the 9 Traditions and 2-3 of the 5 Conventions (depending on how far the Progenitors are taking it in the story, and the Syndicate & NWO don't need to go there, at all) - cyberpunk for only one of each. In no one plays a Virtual Adept or tangles with It-X, no cyberpunk. No SoE or Void Engineers, no space opera. You might get some Tom Clancy level sci-fi from the Progenitors or James Bond gadgets from the NWO, but on the PC side, you have 7 traditions & the Hollow Ones using non-technological magick. If you /just/ want magic along the lines of Harry Potter to Harry Dresden, you're down to the Order of Hermes (and maybe the Verbena), but you /coould/ restrict your story like that, if you wanted. In Mage: The Ascension they are, but not in Mage: The Awakening. One of many things that was better about the oWoD. ;P ...
  • 06:11 PM - Umbran quoted Aldarc in post The urban fantasy market seems awfully stagnant
    ... and the colonial moral superiority of the adventurers.* * "The Murder Hobo's Burden"? Moral superiority of the adventurers, sure. It is only "colonial" if said adventurers move in and take over the place. Settling down is not in the Murder Hobo Manifesto - they are typically raiders, rather than colonizers.
  • 05:32 PM - BoxCrayonTales quoted Aldarc in post The urban fantasy market seems awfully stagnant
    In the context of the OP? I would say, yes, that appears to be the case: The underlying desire seems to be for something that does for urban fantasy what D&D does for pseudo-medieval fantasy, especially without the various lore/edition/setting baggage of WoD. Yes. Not only that, I'm interested in analyses and discussion of world building and themes. There is huge potential yet to be tapped here. I'm interested in challenging our conceptions of how monsters are supposed to work. Fiction like American Vampire and Dresden Files posit settings where multiple different types of, say, vampires and werewolves co-exist. Fiction like Lost Girl treats all monsters as essentially vampiric in nature, even if they feed on abstract concepts like dreams and anger. I'm interesting in analyzing what makes these monsters tick in our minds. What makes the different varieties of vampires identifiable as vampires? What makes the different werewolves identifiable? For example, both Vampire: The Masquerade and ...
  • 04:03 PM - pemerton quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    I'll freely admit that Imaro's task if a bit of a tall order for me. It's essentially asking for pre-scripting out an imaginary conversation, which is an artificial scenario devoid of context.Agreed, but I think my post identifies some features of the Saltmarsh text that mark the contrast with conversational language. For instance, I think that conversatinal language - to the extent that, under some sort of regimentation, it has a main clause - is more likely to have the main clause correspond with the main body of information (eg It's a run-down bedroom with rubbish everywhere rather than There's rubbish scattered everywhere, in what was once a fine bedroom). I also think that conversational language is probably more likely to use verbs in active voice - eg You see a room. There are mouse droppings on the floor. rather than A room comes into view. There is evidence of rodent infestation. And of course, when we take conversation as it occurs without that sort of regimentation, it has a ...
  • 03:16 PM - Manbearcat quoted Aldarc in post The urban fantasy market seems awfully stagnant
    It is definitely Urban Fantasy, but the BitD setting is incredibly restrictive both in geographic scope (Duskvol) and its breadth of urban fantasy tropes. I don't think that one could readily use BitD for a generic urban fantasy game. It curtails itself to a fairly particular play experience. This is one of its strengths, but it can also work against its favor. Ah ok. (I’m asking this out of a position of ignorance) So when someone refers to “Urban Fantasy” in TTRPGing, are they referring to “a malleable game/system without a tight play premise baked in so it can be drifted to (say) the modern focus of ‘paranormal romance’ or something similar?”
  • 12:23 AM - pemerton quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    I'm not really seeing any actual argumentative connection between saying "word choice matters" to "ergo conversational style is invalid" or "ergo evocation narration is best."This is also a major stumbling block for me. Of course word choice matters in communication. So does tone. Etc. Someone has given the example of sarcasm in this or some other recent thread, and that is often a matter of tone. That's all part-and-parcel of conversation.

Saturday, 22nd June, 2019

  • 04:27 PM - Maxperson quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    I got blocked by him when I didn't roll over when he argued that Fate wasn't roleplaying game. (His issue also had to do with metagaming. ;)) Yeah. In the thread where he blocked me, he had already accused me of metagaming in an instance that wasn't actually metagaming, then gone on to describe himself metagaming. When I pointed it out, he got all bent out of shape that anyone would accuse him of metagaming and blocked me.
  • 05:52 AM - Hussar quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    /snip I think that the distinction between conversation and prose tends to amount to more stylistic, tonal, and performative differences rather than vocabulary differences. These differences often pertain to diction, but this is not the same thing as vocabulary. It's about how complexly or formally we construct and arrange our uttered thoughts, but this is not the same thing as vocabulary. Now, this I can agree with. Unfortunately, in the other thread, I got shouted down for equating prose with presentation. I was told, in no uncertain terms, that how we presented the information isn't the issue, but, rather, it's all about the words. So, you can see why I might be a bit confused. For example, if we were to look at this sample description about a husband and wife, we could probably recognize that this is literary prose as opposed to a conversational description. /snippage Discounting proper names, the expected vocabulary size required is relatively small. Even if you ha...
  • 04:11 AM - Imaro quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    What do you do if you have a player who doesn't like evocative narration??? I'd answer this if I even vaguely thought you asked in good faith so... Are you going to keep fishing for attention or are you actually going to contribute to the thread? Hey since you prefer a conversational game how about you do something worthwhile and give an example so we can better understand what you actually mean and how it differs from the narrated examples given earlier in the thread. It cant be that hard to give an example or two of the style you prefer... can it??
  • 02:35 AM - Hussar quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Hussar, I would strongly appreciate it if you would stop constructing strawman arguments with my name attached and insisting that I am strongly saying anything that we both know you can't back up with evidence. It's rude and you're being a dick. Thankfully, I'm confident that Bedrockgames will exercise more sense than to bite at your misrepresentations of what I have said. Wait, what? So, vocabulary IS the important distinction between conversational and prose language? Now I'm really confused. Frankly Aldarc, I'm really having trouble parsing your argument through the snark. Could you please, in simple terms, outline what your argument actually is then? Because, honestly, I wasn't trying to misrepresent anything. I honestly believed that you were arguing that vocabulary did not matter.
  • 12:44 AM - Hussar quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    Just like in the other thread, you continually failed (miserably) to demonstrate that words like "wield" are non-conversational or "a deliberate word choice for a fantasy RPG." IMO, the phrase "wielding a gun", for example, is conversational language. I had even demonstrated that you can have prose with a young child's vocabulary while others indicated that some people exercise a larger vocabulary in their conversations, so vocabulary size and diction should not be equated to prose or non-conversational language. It seems that you never learn and just repeat your same mistakes over. Too bad. I also don't think that something becomes narrative prose just because we use word fields that are more common in some contexts over others. "Halbard" is not a common word of conversation either, but the GM telling players "he charges at you with his halberd" is not necessarily prose either, but can be delivered with a conversational tone or manner. Wow. Bitter much? Just because you got spanked ...

Friday, 21st June, 2019

  • 11:39 PM - Imaro quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    I'm not really seeing any actual argumentative connection between saying "word choice matters" to "ergo conversational style is invalid" or "ergo evocation narration is best." It might be because no one has asserted anything is "invalid" or "best" (except for themselves and their group's playstyle).

Wednesday, 19th June, 2019

  • 06:47 PM - Retreater quoted Aldarc in post Numenera: Third Time Wasn't the Charm
    I am curious about how much damage reduction your opponent had. If you were using a light weapon (+2 dmg) a minimum and got a crit on 17-20 (+1-4 dmg), then that is +3-6 damage. This is not including any other bonuses to damage that your abilities from your type or focus might confer. I'm not familiar with many monsters that have that much damage reduction, but I would need to double-check. I think it was 5 or 6, against a 1st level party. But still, having only a 10% chance to accomplish anything is a bad percentage. Sitting around waiting for my turn just to do nothing does not make a compelling game design. IME, the game isn't so much about combat but, rather, about discovery. Combat mainly serves as an obstacle for making those discoveries. In theory, yes. In practice (based on my XP), I'd say it's not. The two con games I played, both designed and run by Monte Cook affiliates, were both basically set up like D&D adventures. Ambushes in the first adventure that couldn't be avoided. I...
  • 01:08 PM - Garthanos quoted Aldarc in post Favorite things about your favorite edition: MECHANICS/RULES ONLY
    4e: * The WARLORD * Power Sources and Class Roles: This led to 4e having the gumption and vision to pull the trigger on something that not even 2e could commit to doing : removing all divine magic classes from Dark Sun. * Class parity and balance * Scene/narrative-based mechanics (AEDU) * Martial classes had interesting and thematic tactical choices that were typically privileged to magic classes. * Monster design: minions, monster roles, cool monster mechanics, etc. * Tiers of play including epic destinies * Saves as defenses * Rituals The fighter finally having the ability to actually defend could probably be mentioned (I know its in roles but this and warlord are two archetypes which were never mechanically fulfilled til 4e). However for me its pretty much mechanically everything with the above being just the iceberg tip and its almost easier to mention things I didn't like

Tuesday, 18th June, 2019

  • 01:28 PM - Imaro quoted Aldarc in post GM DESCRIPTION: NARRATION OR CONVERSATION?
    I feel like the actual discussion in that thread was about the primary GM role that new gamemasters should focus on learning: scene-framing for player agency or literary performance. The whole conversational vs. literary narration bit was a red herring conversation that we unwittingly got roped into when literary performance camp asked us to conceive of GMing as a conversation without the literary performance. We could and did, but that was still not good enough, and so here we are. That said, I tend to view most roleplaying as a constant state of negotiating the fiction. This is generally done conversationally between GM and players with mechanics often serving the function of a mediator of narrative outcome resolution. Sure, narrative prose can potentially add to the immersion of the game, but it is a non-causal relationship, so I regard it as a secondary concern when compared to the importance of scene-framing for players and as a player. What ultimately matters, IMHO, is that players un...

Sunday, 16th June, 2019

  • 05:23 PM - Maxperson quoted Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    So the literary content of the written text (e.g., diction, structure, style, content) was deprecated by the tone and performance? What if the DM had not read the boxed text aloud - a rote performance - but had instead engaged in a more natural style that communicated the message of the boxed text without reading from it? What you say here suggests that something else that has not really been explored in the conversation much: that the premade "literature" fails to engage the DM who is running it for players. Normally, this has been framed from the presumption that the DM is engaged and we are instead focused on non-DM player engagement. In my experience, this is less about the DM failing to be engaged, and more that the DM has failed to learn the box text in advance and just reads it as he goes. If he had learned it in advance and was able to describe the scene with the box text as the guide, the players would have been more engaged.
  • 01:33 PM - Riley37 quoted Aldarc in post Is RPGing a *literary* endeavour?
    ...een framed from the presumption that the DM is engaged and we are instead focused on non-DM player engagement. Well put. Thank you. Yeah, in this case the author and the DM at the table were different people, perhaps with different goals for use of descriptive language. For all I know, the people who wrote the module cranked up the formality of the prose style, for boxed text, on the basis of tradition - that is, perhaps they felt obligated to match the style of boxed text in whatever modules had formed their understanding of TRPG. As if a module had to provide boxed text with long sentences and lots of scenery-describing adjectives, or else it would not inspire respect, if you know what I mean. FWIW, the DM had found a story/module written for Starfinder, but was running it in the Warhammer setting, and some nuances of tone or scenery may have suffered some distortion in the process. Now I'm extra glad that I gamed today, and that I brought a recent example into the thread, because Aldarc picked up on something in the example! (I imagine that more value may ensue from Aldarc's point, than from the chain of (a) Hriston's declaration, (b) Ovinomancer's declaration, (c) my contradiction of Ovinomancer's declaration and (d) pemerton's counter-contradiction. Time will tell. And "value" varies by who does the assessment of value...)

Saturday, 15th June, 2019

  • 09:31 AM - CapnZapp quoted Aldarc in post "My Pathfinder Spoiler" Glimpses At Pathfinder 2
    But as I already showed, 5e also has ways to circumvent some of the restrictions on spellcasting, not all but a fair number. If PF2 were to only allow 5E levels of restriction-circumvention, I will sleep soundly at night.

Friday, 14th June, 2019

  • 06:21 PM - CapnZapp quoted Aldarc in post "My Pathfinder Spoiler" Glimpses At Pathfinder 2
    But what is the metric you are using? How close does the martial-caster balance in PF2 have to be for you to consider it sufficient? What if it is less than 5e but still far more than 3e? My concern is that LFQW will basically remain. Thank you for agreeing to the basic premise, by the way - that it has no place in a 2019 game. It takes a concerted effort to really banish LFQW (to 5E-like levels). Just reading about the basic rules for magic tell us nothing, unfortunately. All we can glean from that is that LFQW isn't assured. The important question is if any limitations can be circumvented by canny players. The two hot-spots will be high-level wizard (or equivalent, such as "prestige" class) abilities (look out for anything resembling "you may cast this spell without adhering to [X limitation]") and individual spell descriptions (can this spell be cast without [Y limitation], perhaps using a higher-levelled slot?) In other words, we need to know the entire system before we can...


Page 1 of 101 123456789101151 ... LastLast

Aldarc's Downloads

  Filename Total Downloads Rating Files Uploaded Last Updated

Most Recent Favorite Generators/Tables

View All Favorites