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  • Nevvur's Avatar
    Today, 08:10 AM
    It's only as problematic as the DM allows it to become, as goes for the introduction of any house rule. In terms of sidelining other PCs, it's not functionally different than when any other specialist stumbles on a moment to shine. Sometimes the mage gets an arcane puzzle to solve, sometimes the thief gets a lock to pick, and sometimes the sniper gets a clean head shot.
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  • Nevvur's Avatar
    Today, 07:57 AM
    To the OP, it's a surprise attack, and I don't think the rules books are unambiguous about how to handle the situation. So the question I'm hearing is, "Is this a good house rule?" IMO, it is. It works as you described, but I think iserith made the best suggestion at the top of the thread: I understand and respect the positions stated by others pertaining to equanimity with NPCs, e.g....
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  • Nevvur's Avatar
    Friday, 21st June, 2019, 09:09 PM
    Most 5e house rules I've seen add complexity to the system. However, I'm broadly interested to know what other DMs have done to simplify 5e. FWIW, I'm perfectly comfortable running it as is, just picking brains for material as I work on a side project. Some examples might be an even simpler initiative system, changes to the action economy (handling of action/bonus action/reaction), reduced...
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  • Nevvur's Avatar
    Tuesday, 11th June, 2019, 12:19 AM
    Thanks guys, popping back in real quick while the thread is fresh to shift the goal posts a bit. I barely permitted anything outside the PHB for my previous campaigns, so it's germane to remark on XGTE, SCAG, etc. @Larrin I'm aware of the Spirit of Healing one, was still hanging around here a bit when that came out. My table gets the nerf-it treatment FWIW. This is precisely the thing I'm...
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  • Nevvur's Avatar
    Monday, 10th June, 2019, 11:25 PM
    I've been out of the loop for the last year or so, not really in touch with all the content that's come out for 5e in that time. Nor do I want to spend much time researching it, even as I prepare to launch a new campaign where all official resources will be available. My concern is whether other DMs consider any of the new character creation options imbalanced, and if so, which ones? My...
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About Nevvur

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Wednesday, 26th June, 2019


Tuesday, 25th June, 2019


Sunday, 23rd June, 2019


Saturday, 22nd June, 2019


Friday, 21st June, 2019


Thursday, 13th June, 2019

  • 08:07 PM - DM Dave1 mentioned Nevvur in post The last year's worth of character creation options...
    IT was released well over a year ago, however. But, yeah, balance concerns have not been a big deal for any product in 5E yet. Not sure of the point you're making here with your first sentence. MToF was released May 29, 2018 if we really want to be exact. Nevvur said s/he's been away for a year or so. So, yeah... Agreed on your second sentence, in any case.

Friday, 27th April, 2018

  • 02:48 PM - Oofta mentioned Nevvur in post Invisibility /stealth / hide with a rigid DM what can i do instead?
    ...amger actually a multiclassed ranger rogue with proficiency in perception stealth and even lockpicks. I will describe the situations a bit better: We are playing Oota (no Spoilers pls) One of the situations was a mass combat where the Party was had some cover by a room inside a stalagmit. The DM would not allow that i hide/stealth before taking a look out. He said the mobs would instantly notice me because they look at the entrance. So, since stealth is not equal to invisibility i can live with that ruling. But the in Initial postings Situation my char was not moving, hiding and invisible but several derro were swarming the place so he ruled one of them stumbled over me. Since when in such a Situation, i should be able to evade the contact, no? The derro were actively searching for the group or an attacker (and lateron i learned that they had alarms there notifying them of invisible People (but not dispelling the invisibility)) i should mention that for clarity. Based on Nevvur's response I'd say a conversation with the DM (even if it's email/text) is still definitely called for. This may just be some unique situations and it sounds like it may not be as bad as you think. Just keep in mind that a character with the criminal background can do most of what a rogue can do, but a rogue is still going to be better at being a rogue. In addition, while I prefer the looser feel of 5E it does mean there will be a lot of variation from table to table.
  • 12:05 PM - Coroc mentioned Nevvur in post Invisibility /stealth / hide with a rigid DM what can i do instead?
    Nevvur Wow most interesting, that the DM kept so close to the book, and somehow the Situation made it likely to use stealth or invisibility in that spot. Once the campaign is over i will read it up. Thanks to all replies, you were very helpful.

Saturday, 10th February, 2018

  • 05:41 PM - Redthistle mentioned Nevvur in post Character Backstories: Care to share?
    Nevvur. Delightful! It immediately called to mind Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, and that wizard's dealings with the Fey. Your take on the world of faerie is great entertainment. I love Nav's background, and the tale your DM and your group is weaving.

Tuesday, 6th February, 2018

  • 05:10 AM - 77IM mentioned Nevvur in post Swaying a Crowd of NPCs
    Nevvur: You're right about the undecided voters. If we assume that each one flips a coin just before the vote, then it's likely that the PCs' candidate can still win even if they haven't secured enough votes. That changes the math a little bit, but not by much, especially if you assume that most players won't stop schmoozing until they know they have enough votes. I imagine that failure to sway an undecided voter in a particular direction results in siding with the opposite camp. Committed voters are harder to sway and failure to sway means they can no longer be moved off their position. This will make resolution quick and decisive I think, plus it will shut down retries at a certain point. I love the idea of displaying this as a state machine for each NPC: Strongly Decided <---> Decided <---> Undecided If it were me, I would lay out a map of a Viking hall, and arrange the NPCs according to the state machine. Undecideds in the middle, Strongly Decideds in the corners (initially o...

Friday, 29th December, 2017

  • 12:22 AM - ArchfiendBobbie mentioned Nevvur in post Advice on revealing a secret identity.
    An expansion to the idea by @Nevvur below: Maybe the informant isn't a person. Maybe it's a specially-designed magical tome or similar item that has since gained sentience. But it wants free of its current owner, who is someone the Thieves Guild cannot afford to be caught crossing. The guild doesn't know about it in general, but one member does and if suitably compensated may be willing to part with information on doing the job he cannot.

Thursday, 14th December, 2017

  • 11:53 PM - CTurbo mentioned Nevvur in post My players are using my favorite classes against me lol
    I have some new info here. The beginning stat array will be a choice between 16, 15, 14, 12, 10, 8 or 15, 14, 14, 13, 12, 10 before racial bonuses. I let the group agree on a "reasonable" array and this is what they came up with. I don't have any problems with them. We almost always roll for stats. I'm more concerned about them being relatively equal moreso than them being a bit overpowered. If they're ALL overpowered, I just scale up the encounters. Both Pallys and the Tempest Cleric will be heavy armor Str builds, and the other three with be Dex based so I don't think stealth will be too big of an issue for them. I do like the moral dilemma opportunities and I will definitely be using that. Nevvur, my concerns are I feel like they won't have any glaring weaknesses. They're all going to have really high ACs(except for the Lore Bard), and be great at pretty much all saving throws. They can buff, control, and have much greater healing capacity than most parties.

Saturday, 18th November, 2017

  • 12:17 AM - Trit One-Ear mentioned Nevvur in post Help developing Drow plot
    Nevvur - You have it right, they're pretty much moving from behind the scenes, though they do have a small presence in the city - enough to put pressure on the higher ups and keep an eye on things. They have had the Archmage issue orders to seal the city to outsiders though, which has drawn some attention. I have a couple ideas. The Ritual could just produce similar results of the previous one. In reality the spell not only puts the dragon into a slumber but slowly drains it lifeforce and magical essence and that power is absorbed to a high priestess of drow who slowly gains power and turns into some kind of drow dragon hybrid. That means that more heros wait more powerfull The priestess becomes. Could make a choice of braking the ritual, which means the dragon wakes up (priestess may ar may not die due to this action) or slaying the dragon which means the priestess does not get more power but the city looses its amplification of magic. The Archmage could be dead and the one that looks like...

Wednesday, 15th November, 2017

  • 02:59 AM - pukunui mentioned Nevvur in post XGTE Errata
    Nevvur: I hyperlinked all the answers, which got rid of the green text. I hope that's OK. Jeremy says they've found (and fixed) three errors so far, and he's got his eye on a fourth (see below). I've added the other one (mind spike), plus my question about the Second Chance feat to the original post. I sure hope Healing Spirits gets an errata soon...Jeremy Crawford says he's keeping his eye on it and will change it if it becomes an actual problem in play (vs a theoretical one).

Tuesday, 14th November, 2017

  • 05:11 PM - OB1 mentioned Nevvur in post Where did the 6-8 encounter standard come from?
    I disagree with the conclusion. The reason that I use the 6-8 encounters is because there is a large amount of empirical evidence across a lot of tables that shows that this is the point the at-will, short-rest-recharge and long-rest-recharge classes balance against each other as well as common attrition tactics take a toll. Fewer, harder encounters favor some classes more and disfavor other. Number one common element in "5e is easy mode" threads is that they don't do 6-8 encounters. BTW, I'm not defending 6-8 encounters - I really enjoy 5e and it's by far my biggest complain about the system. I'm just saying that the reason the 6-8 gets talked about is because not only do they suggest it, but it holds up. Like as if they balanced against it. I agree this section is worded horribly and lends itself to confusion. Nevvur correctly quoted the DMG, but in your response you are already dropping the key words of CAN along with MEDIUM TO HARD. These are all very important factors in the guideline. When you look at the Adventure Day XP guidelines, you quickly see that what is missing from the 6-8 encounter assumption is that 3 Deadlies also give you the full adventuring day XP and equal the amount before a typical short rest. So you CAN get to the recommended maximum in 3 Deadly fights (with a short rest between each). Now, I know there is an argument that favors LR classes. But in actually play it doesn't. Sure, a Barbarian can theoretically rage in every encounter if you are going 3 Deadlies, but that assumes first that the Barbarian knows there is going to be exactly 3 encounters and that there would be a need or desire for the Barbarian to rage in each of 8 medium encounters. As for LR spellcasters, the fewer number of encounters per day is balanced by the fact that the number of combat ro...

Monday, 30th October, 2017

  • 06:04 AM - Wulffolk mentioned Nevvur in post Solution to ASI Problem
    Nevvur Thank you for your insights. I had considered that monsters might be more challenging if PC's don't have a 20 in their primary Ability, and I am fine with that. I would consider it more of a feature than a problem. You are definitely correct in your observation that this would have a greater impact on SAD Classes than it would on MAD Classes. I will give this some thought, but I am not sure that I would consider this a problem. Super specialization should mean some deficiency elsewhere.

Wednesday, 18th October, 2017

  • 04:38 PM - Wulffolk mentioned Nevvur in post E6 in 5e
    Someone else brought up the issue that, without dead levels, there's a lot going on in classes we'd like to see. Such as, if I was playing a wizard, I would like to see getting my hands on the level 10 subclass ability. Or an eldritch knight being able to do the teleport when spending an action surge. Those are fun, often iconic abilities. A paladin might want to get their subclass' aura. A monk or sorcerer want to increase their class points, while a battlemaster would want more martial dice, even if they don't get more sides on the dice. How are we going to address this? Yup, it would probably be a good thing to condense some of the interesting abilities into the dead levels. It would take work, but might be worth it. Once I start house-ruling things I tend to get out of control, practically re-writing the game. Maybe I will get around to re-writing an E6 version of 5e, or maybe I will be lazy and wait to see what Nevvur comes up with.

Sunday, 8th October, 2017

  • 11:43 PM - Harzel mentioned Nevvur in post Telegraph This
    Is there a way I can let the PCs know that bribery is on the table without just coming out and saying it? Isn't bribery always on the table? ;) More seriously, I think others have pretty much covered the ideas that occurred to me, but I will just add that they mainly stem from a general principle: Don't tell - show. Show the duergar being greedy; show the duergar ordering around some other animated objects; show the objects being deferential to dwarves. Of course, 'show' still means 'describe', but the point is to describe instances/examples of a general idea and then let the PCs infer the general idea. Of course, since you have limited opportunities to make the point, the examples often have to be quite blatant, but, as Nevvur noted, what is obvious to the DM is almost always not obvious to the players. The players may only get one or two examples of what their PCs would see dozens or hundreds of instances of.

Sunday, 1st October, 2017

  • 03:11 AM - Rhenny mentioned Nevvur in post Help and advice for 5e spellcaster
    I'll add to what Nevvur wrote too. Ultimately you should just play what you think would be fun for you. Don't worry about filling out the party. 5e is very flexible when it comes to party configuration and PC roles.

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Wednesday, 26th June, 2019

  • 06:56 PM - Saelorn quoted Nevvur in post Attacking defenseless NPCs
    It's only as problematic as the DM allows it to become, as goes for the introduction of any house rule. In terms of sidelining other PCs, it's not functionally different than when any other specialist stumbles on a moment to shine. Sometimes the mage gets an arcane puzzle to solve, sometimes the thief gets a lock to pick, and sometimes the sniper gets a clean head shot.I wasn't just talking about snipers. I was also talking about critical hits, called shots, "vitality points", and many other house rules that give ways to bypass Hit Points. Such rules are universally bad, within the context of an HP-based system like D&D.

Sunday, 23rd June, 2019

  • 08:39 PM - Li Shenron quoted Nevvur in post House ruling toward simplicity
    Most 5e house rules I've seen add complexity to the system. However, I'm broadly interested to know what other DMs have done to simplify 5e. FWIW, I'm perfectly comfortable running it as is, just picking brains for material as I work on a side project. Some examples might be an even simpler initiative system, changes to the action economy (handling of action/bonus action/reaction), reduced character creation options, etc. Simplifying character creation and simplifying in-game rules are very different things. In 5e I have often simplified character creation because I have had beginners in every group, and didn't want to cause analysis-paralysis to delay the start of the game. I have used for example the following, tho not all in the same group: - pregenerated or partially pregen. PCs - ability scores array only - simplified races (i.e. less features) - human stats for all races - fixed prepared spells lists As for in-game rules instead I don't really house rule anything bu...

Friday, 21st June, 2019

  • 09:37 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Nevvur in post House ruling toward simplicity
    Most 5e house rules I've seen add complexity to the system. However, I'm broadly interested to know what other DMs have done to simplify 5e. FWIW, I'm perfectly comfortable running it as is, just picking brains for material as I work on a side project. Some examples might be an even simpler initiative system, changes to the action economy (handling of action/bonus action/reaction), reduced character creation options, etc.There is a lot of complexity, but it's hard to jettison without depriving players of options. Obviously, first, don't use any optional rules. Feats & MCing are just added complexity. Bonus actions and concentration add complexity, for instance, so do reactions - removing everything that uses them would reduce the complexity of the game. Not removing the mechanics (which might render a variety of things OP or otherwise broken), but everything that uses them - so TWF, healing word? use bonus action: gone. Haste, Summoning? use Concentration: gone. Opportunity Attacks,...

Sunday, 16th June, 2019

  • 02:04 AM - doctorbadwolf quoted Nevvur in post Streamlined 4e combat
    Thanks for the input, everyone. @Tony Vargas, that 4.5e guide was basically the sort of thing I hoped to find, but reading it, I realized the flaw in my quest. My memory of the uncomfortably long combats in 4e was more about the numerous and cumulative bonuses/penalties to every action than anything else. Magic weapon, flanking, racial feat, class feat, concealment penalty, and so on. I was hoping to find a 4e revision that addressed this specific issue, but as I revisit the core books and skim over that guide, I'm reminded how essential all those circumstantial modifiers are in delivering the tight tactical experience I otherwise loved. In short, mine may have been a fool's errand. Still, I'll stick around and read whatever others have to say on the matter. I think that folding all off turn powers and action options into 1 Reaction per round helps, but it does reduce off turn engagement somewhat. Otherwise, make untyped bonuses not stack with other untyped bonuses, and tighten up the ...

Wednesday, 30th January, 2019

  • 11:48 PM - Mercule quoted Nevvur in post what would you want to see in a revised Weapon Chart?
    I would go the other way. Reduce the weapon chart to a 2x2 matrix of heavy/light-melee/ranged to produce 2-hand weapons, 1-hand weapons, projectile weapons, and thrown weapons. Give them base stats. Now push the modifiers to classes. You have 4 weapons that can be anything. I wouldn't go quite that far, but I've definitely bought into the Savage Worlds idea of trappings. If there's no statistical difference, don't create another entry -- at the least, be OK with the fact that it's just a new name for the same stats. Most times, there's no need for statistical difference. Trying to force the issue is a low ROI.
  • 09:47 PM - Blue quoted Nevvur in post what would you want to see in a revised Weapon Chart?
    I would go the other way. Reduce the weapon chart to a 2x2 matrix of heavy/light-melee/ranged to produce 2-hand weapons, 1-hand weapons, projectile weapons, and thrown weapons. Give them base stats. Now push the modifiers to classes. You have 4 weapons that can be anything. That's really close to how 13th Age (a d20 game) does it. Here's a sample for the Fighter: http://www.13thagesrd.com/classes/fighter/#Gear And compare it to the Rogue: https://www.13thagesrd.com/classes/rogue/#Gear Rogues get more damage from small and light weapons then Fighters, but have penalties with heavy weapons. The classes also do it for armor - some classes get better usage from different types of armor, or unarmored. Unarmored a rogue starts AC 11 instead of 10. But the fighter gets a lot more out of heavy armor then the rogue.

Tuesday, 22nd January, 2019

  • 02:50 AM - DrMapzo quoted Nevvur in post Color Maps for Virtual Tabletops by Me
    Thank you all for the responses, I'm glad you find them useful! Ya, I could definitely use some of these for my campaigns, thanks for sharing! Are you able to quickly reproduce versions without non-terrain objects? For instance, a version of the winter map without the tipped cart and barrels? Yes! I didn't mention it in my OP, but I offer multiple variations of my maps on my Patreon; For the winter map there's a version without the cart and another one without the snow for instance. The map also comes with separate cart and barrel tokens if you wish to use them on another map too! As a long-time user of VTT as well, I definitely agree here. Maps for VTT benefit from not having the grids on them. Just make the map align to a certain dimension* and then say what it is. The user then sets up the map to that size and then is done. This allows the user to operate without a grid, use a different grid color, or add their own terrain objects without disrupting the grid. *For the dime...

Sunday, 20th January, 2019

  • 05:47 AM - Mistwell quoted Nevvur in post We learn more from failure...
    There's that old adage about learning more from failure than success. For those DMs who track XP instead of milestones, have you attempted to model this when awarding XP? If so, what did that look like at your table? I've awarded XP for successfully fleeing a creature too powerful for the party. It's akin in my mind to solving a problem - the problem being they would die if they stayed.

Friday, 18th January, 2019


Wednesday, 16th January, 2019

  • 06:41 PM - iserith quoted Nevvur in post Voices in the players head. could use some ides from fellow dms
    A specified outcome and a "DM arbitrarily telling..." is not the comparison I was making. To answer your question, I was hoping to gain some insight into what this theoretical voice and its form of control represented to you as a storytelling device, which you have done adequately. To me, the interaction is closer to an NPC exerting influence on the PC than the DM assuming control of the PC, even while the practical side of game play suggests the latter. Which is to say, it would function similarly to how mind control effects play out, hence me bringing it up. It's not the sort of thing I would blindside a player and impose on a PC, but as a proposal from a player? I just don't see the problem, nor the distinction between said proposal and standard mind control effects, and it baffled me you would advise against it. For my part, anything is possible with player buy-in, it's just that I wouldn't want to do this as DM at all. I like to stay in my lane and prefer to avoid techniques that ...
  • 04:46 PM - Ovinomancer quoted Nevvur in post Voices in the players head. could use some ides from fellow dms
    Would you mind addressing the second half of my post while you're at it?Do you think that changes things? Do you not see a difference between a mechanic in gane that has a specified outcome is different ftom a DM arbitrarily telling a player "now your character feels this and does that?"
  • 12:34 PM - Ovinomancer quoted Nevvur in post Voices in the players head. could use some ides from fellow dms
    No game system text will contain the full set of parameters that can govern the interaction between player and GM, certainly not that block of text. You are effectively making up a rule that is, indeed, telling people how to play. Beyond that, the system itself produces situations where the DM controls the character (mind control). It's not clear to me what really distinguishes a game where that is a possible and one where the player requests it as part of the concept.This is a specious argument. You're using the general statement that no ruleset can cover all situations to say that no specific rule can cover a soecific situation. In this case, the job of the DM is the world and the narrating outcomes. The job of the player is to declare character actions. This split holds 100% true across multiple games, not just 5e. You can do something else, sure, but you can also follow this rule in every single interaction in 5e. Every. One. This is because this rule doesn't model anything in t...
  • 04:10 AM - Ovinomancer quoted Nevvur in post Voices in the players head. could use some ides from fellow dms
    Ovinomancer I recognize your first response was full of "should" and not "must." But you followed it up with "A DM's job is..." This is a statement of convention unsupported by the reality of play and was the focus of my rebuttal, not your otherwise well stated advice. From the Basic 5e Rules: The play of the Dungeons & Dragons game unfolds according to this basic pattern. 1. The DM describes the environment. The DM tells the players where their adventurers are and what’s around them, presenting the basic scope of options that present themselves (how many doors lead out of a room, what’s on a table, who’s in the tavern, and so on). 2. The players describe what they want to do. Sometimes one player speaks for the whole party, saying, “We’ll take the east door,” for example. Other times, different adventurers do different things: one adventurer might search a treasure chest while a second examines an esoteric symbol engraved on a wall and a third keeps watch for monsters. The p...
  • 12:14 AM - Ovinomancer quoted Nevvur in post Voices in the players head. could use some ides from fellow dms
    The point of the game is to have fun. It's not your place to decide what that looks like at other tables.Did I? Weird, I missed where I got a gaming policeman's badge and went powermad controlling other people's games. Happens every time, though, despite me saying, "not this time, self!" Alas, I always end up busted back to forum poster offering advice on pretend elf games.

Tuesday, 15th January, 2019

  • 09:00 PM - Ovinomancer quoted Nevvur in post Voices in the players head. could use some ides from fellow dms
    Unless the player wants to relinquish that sort of control to the DM as part of the concept. Otherwise, I agree. @TheDungeonTomb - I'm not sure tables and charts are the way to go here, assuming you move forward with the idea. It might seem daunting to improvise those voices, but improvisation is a skill, and skills can improve with practice. Might be a little rocky at first, but will probably feel more organic as you adapt. I'd be a little wary about approaching this from the position of clinical psychology. It can make for a very compelling and 'human' (whatever her race) story if handled well, but dissociative personality disorder is some pretty heavy stuff. Have you done any research into the condition? I'm curious if you and this player have discussed the concept with the rest of the group? An alternative may be some form of demonic possession. Doesn't have to be a fire and brimstone type fiend, or even have stats. Just an insidious presence voicing the same thoughts you were already...
  • 02:30 AM - Saelorn quoted Nevvur in post We learn more from failure...
    In discussion with my buddy, we examined using degrees of success and failure on ability checks to modify XP awards for obstacles that would normally award them, but it presented more problems than the alleged 'realism' was worth. That's the sort of stuff I was hoping to examine, if anyone else even tried. I've seen a couple of less-mainstream games that tried to quantify participation by granting XP based on damage dealt and received, with the idea being that more powerful enemies would give and take more damage in order to defeat. As you might suspect, they tend to not work out well, as fights devolved into players going out of their way to take damage in lieu of finishing anyone off (as per Final Fantasy II). Any system can be gamed, and rewarding failure just encourages players to fail.
  • 02:16 AM - quoted Nevvur in post We learn more from failure...
    @ no one in particular I might rephrase the supposition as we can learn something from most types of failures, potentially but not necessarily more than we would if we succeeded, but it doesn't quite roll off the tongue. I think you're probably right with somewhat wordier, but more precise statement.
  • 01:11 AM - Saelorn quoted Nevvur in post We learn more from failure...
    There's that old adage about learning more from failure than success. For those DMs who track XP instead of milestones, have you attempted to model this when awarding XP? If so, what did that look like at your table?If the party fails in a D&D game, then they're most likely all dead, and incapable of further learning.

Monday, 14th January, 2019

  • 11:58 PM - GreyLord quoted Nevvur in post We learn more from failure...
    There's that old adage about learning more from failure than success. For those DMs who track XP instead of milestones, have you attempted to model this when awarding XP? If so, what did that look like at your table? Because when your character is dead they can gain levels all that much faster?

Friday, 11th January, 2019

  • 01:08 PM - Thyrwyn quoted Nevvur in post Thought experiment: human and variant stats as expressions of culture
    I'm considering some revisions to a homebrew world which features two major human civilizations. I thought it would be interesting if all the humans from CivA used the normal racial bonuses for humans, while CivB used the human variant option. The underlying assumption here is that CivA tries to produce more well rounded citizens, while CivB puts more resources into specialization. 1) Does this sound like a plausible interplay of narrative and mechanics? If not, why? 2) As a player, if your DM used this model and the racial bonuses did not correspond to the civilization you prefer, or vice versa, would you switch one? 3) As a DM using this model, if one of your players asked to use one civ's narrative and the other's racial bonuses, would you permit it? Answers: 1) maybe, but it sounds more like conformity vs individuality. I’ll add more on this later... 2) I lean towards RP first, so the choice would depend on the description of the cultures, but with no other information, I’d lean ...


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