View Profile: Bradley Hindman - Morrus' Unofficial Tabletop RPG News
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About Bradley Hindman

Basic Information

About Bradley Hindman
Introduction:
RPing in the Boulder area for 25 years.
About Me:
Three short facts about myself:
1) I am a professor of astrophysics at the University of Colorado in Boulder.
2) I have played RPGs since the late 70s (starting with D&D of course).
3) I am a founding member of Dog House Rules (DHR), a small game company that produced the Western RPG Sidewinder: Recoiled (we won an ENnie!).
Location:
Longmont, Colorado
Disable sharing sidebar?:
Yes
Sex:
Male
Age Group:
Over 40
My Game Details

Details of games currently playing and games being sought.

Town:
Longmont
State:
Colorado
Country:
USA
Game Details:
I am currently running a game based loosely on Norse Mythology called Ragnarok Postponed. It began using the FATE system but has now been converted to D&D 5th edition.

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191
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Last Post
Mythological Figures: Billy the Kidd (5E) Yesterday 08:17 PM

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Last Activity
Yesterday 10:32 PM
Join Date
Friday, 25th June, 2010
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My Game Details
Town:
Longmont
State:
Colorado
Country:
USA
Game Details:
I am currently running a game based loosely on Norse Mythology called Ragnarok Postponed. It began using the FATE system but has now been converted to D&D 5th edition.
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Thursday, 27th September, 2018


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Thursday, 2nd May, 2019

  • 12:30 AM - Saelorn quoted Bradley Hindman in post Crafting Items - Expert Craftsman vs Adventurers
    Further, perhaps we have a different understanding of what is meant by "impartial" in this instance. I honestly don't quite understand what you mean . Do you mean impartial at the table? Sure. A partial DM who tries to force a particular outcome or favors one player over another is gonna piss players off. However, I don't see how you can be impartial when designing adventures or designing a campaign.Yes, I consider the actions of the world-builder to be distinct from the actions of the DM-at-the-table, for the same reason that I consider character creation to be distinct from role-playing your character at the table. Frequently, both tasks are performed by the same person; but they need not be, and even if they are, they are governed by different principles and restrictions. The world-builder should create a setting or adventure that lends itself toward exciting gameplay, so that the DM-at-the-table doesn't need to cheat in order for interesting things to happen. Often, that's going to involve so...

Wednesday, 1st May, 2019

  • 11:48 PM - Saelorn quoted Bradley Hindman in post Crafting Items - Expert Craftsman vs Adventurers
    While I understand the point you are trying to make, I disagree at a fundamental level. The DM should have at least one want. The DM should want the players to have a good time.I'm all for making the game your own, but as a baseline default until someone says otherwise, everyone at the table will have the most fun if the DM remains impartial. That's what you're signing up for, when you agree to play D&D rather than some other game. If that's not why you're playing, then you need to discuss that with your DM.

Thursday, 25th April, 2019

  • 09:40 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bradley Hindman in post Crafting Items - Expert Craftsman vs Adventurers
    1) If everyone rolls their dice out in the open (as we do), its pretty easy for players to work out ACs, attack bonuses, hit points, ability modifiers, etc. It can be a good idea for the DM to keep his rolls behind the screen, of course. But everyone else, I should hope, out in the open, sure. And I suppose it's a matter of taste whether working out the game stats of monsters/NPCs is "metagaming" or "immersion." As a DM I am happy to have the players be familiar with the stats of commonly encountered schlubs. When presented with a patrol of 20 soldiers, they will have a good idea of whether they should take them on or not. This allows me to present a more naturally diverse set of encounters with variable difficulty. The players can decide for themselves whether they should run, be sneaky, negotiate, or just charge in. Of course occasionally, things ain't what they seem . . . Some systems lend themselves better to stats out in the open than others, IMHO. D&D, traditionally - and 5e is tra...
  • 06:28 PM - Tony Vargas quoted Bradley Hindman in post Crafting Items - Expert Craftsman vs Adventurers
    A good shot is going to be a good shot whether that person is lvl 1 or lvl 19. The difference in level or experience, IS that the 19 can do that same shot over and over and over and over again, while the 1 will not be anywhere near as consistent.True, you see that in the Olympics, for instance. Though d20 checks under BA don't really provide that distinction, either. Last night we had an encounter with 13 orcs and 5 orogs. Our party has one 6th, 4 5th's, and 3 "veteran" NPCs. A fireball wiped out 10 orcs, slow affects most orogs, and the battle was a route even though we were outnumbered over 2-1. This should be a deadly encounter, but with the surprise element it was reduced to easy... … After the slow spell, I wanted to cast web, but couldn't because of the concentration mechanic. Then I thought of maybe using bless on the NPCs, but again, can't because of concentrating on slow. The concentration mechanic nerfs casters SO badly. Basically, you cast one concentration spell and then are reduce...

Monday, 8th October, 2018

  • 11:01 PM - Gradine quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Halloween 2018 5e Undead- Wraith WINS!
    Wow! Aren't you quite the necromancer @Ickam. How far back did you go to dig up those voting totals? You certainly didn't work off of the previous post. I would have corrected them, but you upvoted the zombie which has already been eliminated from the competition! I guess the old adage is true. There's no way to keep a good zombie down. Maybe it's in your head. In your head.

Monday, 1st October, 2018

  • 11:41 PM - Hussar quoted Bradley Hindman in post What DM flaw has caused you to actually leave a game?
    We had SOPs back in the day, but they were usually SOPs for the players not the characters. They were used as short-hand "against" DMs that required the utterance of magic words. When we got tired of pixel bitching we'd just say, "SOP". Where SOP = "we carefully search, examine, open, study, recall lore about, and ponder over everything you (the DM) just described to us. If you said a noun, it gets the treatment." Sure it was passive-aggressive, but having to openly state every single action or mental function, no matter how obvious, was just annoying. So much this.

Wednesday, 12th September, 2018

  • 10:47 PM - Flexor the Mighty! quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix E (5e) Authors- Ursula K. LeGWINS!
    My biggest complaint with King is that the beginnings of his novels are so fantastic that I am majorly disillusioned by his endings. It just seems that he has no idea how to finish the story. Hence, my favorite King works are his short stories (which are well-crafted and in many cases brilliant) and the books he writes with a co-author. Co-authored novels require a careful plotting of beginning through the END before you start actually start writing. I loved most of his classic endings where the protagonist just ends up getting totally screwed in the process of "winning". My issues were bloat along with poor characters and plots.
  • 03:29 PM - Ralif Redhammer quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix E (5e) Authors- Ursula K. LeGWINS!
    The Forgotten Beasts of Eld and Riddle-Master of Hed are both amazing works that deserve to have their praises sung loudly. It took me years to come across them, and that is a shame. Also, totally agree on Mieville. And I wanted to like his stuff quite a bit. For my part, I’m going to upvote Sir Terry. For humorous books, they’re awfully profound. Downvote for Stephen King. Never been able to get into his books. [Edited to include Sacrosanct's votes] Ahmed, Saladin 18 Alexander, Lloyd 25 Anthony, Piers 16 Augusta, Lady Gregory 20 Bear, Elizabeth 20 Brooks, Terry 20 Bulfinch, Thomas 21 Cook, Glen 26 Froud, Brian & Alan Lee 21 Hickman, Tracy & Margaret Weis 11 Hodgson, William Hope 18 Jemisin, N.K. 21 Jordan. Robert 19 Kay, Guy Gavriel 20 King, Stephen 3 LeGuin, Ursula 23 Lynch, Scott 21 Martin, George R.R. 8 McKillip, Patricia 21 Mieville, China 18 Peake, Mervyn 20 Pratchett, Terry 22 Rothfuss, Patrick 16 Sanderson, Brandon 25 Smith, Clark Ashton 20 Tolstoy, Nikolai 19 Wolfe, Gene 20 McKilli...

Thursday, 6th September, 2018


Wednesday, 5th September, 2018

  • 11:13 PM - SkidAce quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    I have the same problem with Brandon Sanderson. Good ideas, too many words to get them across. I HERETIC! Filthy, unclean....get thee hence from me.... Maaaaadness I tell yah.....* *just kidding...mostly....:cool:
  • 09:04 PM - Parmandur quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    Yeah. I shouldn't have brought up Sanderson, as he must be paid by the word. (Although his more recent Alloy of Law series is more to the point.) . . . and you're right it isn't necessarily the page count. Its what you do with those pages. There is a lot in the Lord of the Rings that is . . . at the risk of painting a target on myself . . . filler. Lot's of stuff that if cut wouldn't remove from the central story: poems, long-winded historical accounts, superfluous scenes (e.g., Tom Bombadil) etc. In places it feels a lot like reading the Icelandic sagas word for word, with their pages of genealogy. Now, I realize that much of this extra material may help set the tone and many view it as value-added. At the time when I first read the Lord of the Rings, I didn't mind it at all. Now, I find it a distraction. I was hoping that the movies would be more tightly edited, as movies usually are. But, we all know how that went (really, did The Hobbit need to be a movie trilogy?) Oh, man,beyo...
  • 09:02 PM - CleverNickName quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    PS . . . and I only read the first two books in "A Game of Thrones" for the same reason. The first one was great, but after finishing the second and realizing that many of the character who were introduced were never connected to any of the other characters (in fact a couple died before they could interact with the primary story), I gave up on the series.You're not alone; I couldn't even finish the first one. I kept finding other, more interesting stuff to read. :)
  • 08:59 PM - CleverNickName quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    . . . and you're right it isn't necessarily the page count. Its what you do with those pages. There is a lot in the Lord of the Rings that is . . . at the risk of painting a target on myself . . . filler. Lot's of stuff that if cut wouldn't remove from the central story...Completely agree; a lot of the stuff in the Lord of the Rings (and The Hobbit) are backstory and history. Today's readers already know what a "dwarf" is in fantasy literature, and an "elf," and a "halfling." This stuff is all well-established here in the 21st century. The world-building all feels superfluous by today's standards, but at the time it was written it was incredible--the richness, the color, the detail, was still shiny. Today's "brand" of fantasy fiction owes a great deal to Tolkien. There's no escaping that.
  • 07:36 PM - CleverNickName quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    Both Sanderson and Tolkien need an editor with a cruel heart to cut those tomes down to a reasonable size.Disagree. A thousand pages across 3 books is a very reasonable size, even by today's standards. ("A Game of Thrones" alone was almost 800 pages.) The pacing of the story might be slow, but the page count isn't the problem. Just sayin'.
  • 07:27 PM - Reynard quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    Both Sanderson and Tolkien need an editor with a cruel heart to cut those tomes down to a reasonable size. Wait, what? Tolkien does in a single 1000 page volume what Sanderson can't manage in seven. Never mind Martin or Jordan or their BFF imitators. Say what you want about Tolkien but compared to today's authors he was downright terse.

Thursday, 30th August, 2018

  • 06:31 PM - Gradine quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Appendix N Authors- LEIBER WINS!
    Really, and why do you say this? (Honest question). Some of her earlier works, particularly when she was writing under a male pseudonym, contained a lot of sexist tropes (particular the "evil women dominate males" trope; think the Nic Cage Wicker Man remake, or better yet don't). As she advanced in her career however her female characters and her general treatment of gender in genre fiction became a lot more nuanced and critical. It's very similar to how Edgar Rice Burroughs treated race over the course of his career.

Wednesday, 29th August, 2018


Friday, 15th June, 2018

  • 02:54 PM - lowkey13 quoted Bradley Hindman in post Survivor Elves, Elves, Elves- WOOD ELF WINS!
    Well, then. Allows us to only downvote! I would have used that option exclusively. Naw ... changing the rules in the middle of the game is last refuge of scoundrels and gnomes. But I repeat myself.
  • 02:13 AM - psychophipps quoted Bradley Hindman in post Monk Unarmed Strike
    Is there any reason for this perverse "rule"? Does it really imbalance anything if unarmed strikes are just considered another melee weapon, treated like all others?It can cause issues with abilities like smiting and that ridiculous Hexblade thing that acts like Smiting turned to "11" with the knob broke off, but isn't Smiting.

Thursday, 14th June, 2018

  • 08:30 PM - Li Shenron quoted Bradley Hindman in post Monk Unarmed Strike
    Is there any reason for this perverse "rule"? Does it really imbalance anything if unarmed strikes are just considered another melee weapon, treated like all others? It's there mainly so that nobody is tempted to think that you can enchant your body parts or use special abilities with them. In addition, "unarmed strike" is not even a specific body part, it's rather a movement that can refer to any body part. TBH I think it could have been easier to just say explicitly that SS and other monk abilities can be used with it. SS is actually more meant for unarmed strikes than weapons, and it is odd that you have to look at rules in scattered places to figure it out. The kensai OTOH is meant to be a monk specialized in manufactured weapons.


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