How to use pregenerated material for own inspiration?
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  1. #1
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    How to use pregenerated material for own inspiration?

    Hello everybody,

    I wanna improve my Game Mastering, especially my adventure planning. As in one of my groups I do not want to run a complete pre-generated adventure path, but want to design my own world, adventures, etc. I was thinking about how to use pre-generated material for my own inspiration.

    Maybe you do not know what I want, so heres some explanation:
    If I take my own ideas there often not worked out that good.
    But on the other hand the pre-generated content is often too "long", or too "strictly", or does not fit my group good enough.

    But if I want to take the pre-generated stuff and want to use them as some kind of "template" for my own ideas this often ends in a desaster I will spoil the good stuff and yeah... it does not end very well...

    As I'm not the best storywriter I was thinking about if some of you out there has some concepts, ideas, methods on how to build good adventures.

    And one last thing: I'm quite good at improvising and using instant ideas at the table. My weak spot are the planning before the sessions. To write down good storylines which give me some guidance through the session but not limiting my improvisation (which pre-generated content often does).
    So I have some guidance, a rough storyline but not every detail. The main concept.
    But I found it very hard to build a good main concept which has a good story, twist and so on.

    I hope you undestand my problem and have some ideas for me. Maybe some literature?

    best regards

  2. #2
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    Consider first how to use pre-written material to save you some work. It has sites, maps, pre-keyed locations, stat blocks, etc. Many have shorter adventure elements within a larger adventure that can be harvested. They are bricks for your campaign -- you're building a cathedral so you don't want to take time focusing on building bricks.

    Design your campaign to link individual pre-written elements, the bricks. This allows you to focus on motivations, linkages, and meta-plot, while saving you the tedious work of detailing out sites. It also allows for multiple branches in your campaign. Say, for example, there are three dungeon/adventure sites you like for a particular level. Pare away the motivations and plots that come with them, and reuse the sites themselves. What adventure hook might lead to them? What hooks might lead from them to the next phase of your adventure? You can now present your players with a couple of hooks, and no matter which ones they pursue they lead to a location you have prepared, adn you've thought about what happens afterward to lead to the next phase.

    One of the important things to do when planning this way it not to plan too far ahead. You don't need a detailed plan for an entire campaign. You just need a general concept, and a detailed plan that goes about two steps ahead of your players.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plancktum View Post
    Hello everybody
    Hello!

    If I take my own ideas there often not worked out that good.
    Can you give an example of how your ideas are not worked out and go wrong in play? You mention below that you spoil big secrets...is that what you mean? That you end up tipping your hand as DM too early?

    But on the other hand the pre-generated content is often too "long", or too "strictly", or does not fit my group good enough.
    Join the club? Pretty much every DM I know tweaks other people's modules for the reasons you give.

    As I'm not the best storywriter I was thinking about if some of you out there has some concepts, ideas, methods on how to build good adventures.
    Before we go much further, could you really clarify what you mean by "not the best story writer"? Folks have all kinds of ideas about what 'Story' means in regards to RPGs, so it would be good to get a better sense of where you're coming from first.

    And one last thing: I'm quite good at improvising and using instant ideas at the table. My weak spot are the planning before the sessions.
    You sound like the kind of DM who'd do really well with a one-page adventure flowchart in front of you, and not much else needed. But that's just a hunch.

    Also, @Olgar Shiverstone has good advice, heed it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plancktum View Post
    And one last thing: I'm quite good at improvising and using instant ideas at the table. My weak spot are the planning before the sessions. To write down good storylines which give me some guidance through the session but not limiting my improvisation (which pre-generated content often does).
    So I have some guidance, a rough storyline but not every detail. The main concept.
    But I found it very hard to build a good main concept which has a good story, twist and so on.

    I hope you undestand my problem and have some ideas for me. Maybe some literature?
    Are your players proactive? Are you good at taking notes? If so, you might want to check out Mythic: Game Master Emulator. The system is designed to help DMs generate an interesting, dynamic narrative with an emphasis on improvisation. Black Vulmea did an excellent write-up of a session on his blog Really Bad Eggs. Essentially, your planning is simply reviewing your notes from the previous sessions. It is a great system and one that I am currently using for my own campaign.

  5. #5
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    Depending on how "full" the world you're starting with is there are simple things:

    Add stuff to an area of the world-map that is fairly unused. The world gives you naming conventions (so you'll know if a town called "Rock Ridge" is more fitting than "Alleria" or if people would be more likely to call something the "Desert of Despair" or "Queens Wastes"), and it also gives you "common knowledge" your players can know about the world without you having to develop it yourself.

    Alternate histories are fun, but much more work. Pick an area, and say, 100 years ago an evil lich took over the kingdom instead of the honorable knight. How would the world be different for it? This depends on how well connected the city is and how much of the map it takes up.

    As a bit of a hybrid of the two, you can repurpose areas. So, instead of a tropical jungle, you have a desert. How are the people and world different for it?

    Of course, you can go much more basic than this, but these are the basic techniques for modifying existing content to make something more "yours". Eventually you've altered enough of the world to make it lose it's resemblance to the source material. At the most basic, you can use a world to gauge how far mountains should be from deserts, how far apart major cities are, how towns become fewer and smaller the further you get from a major port or city, the types of farming that take place near a forest as opposed to near an ocean.

    Even a map of the real world from say, 1000ad can be a good idea of what a fantasy world might look like. And fantasy "what if magic/elves/dragons existed..." Earth's can be fun too.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by plancktum View Post
    Hello everybody,

    I wanna improve my Game Mastering, especially my adventure planning. As in one of my groups I do not want to run a complete pre-generated adventure path, but want to design my own world, adventures, etc. I was thinking about how to use pre-generated material for my own inspiration.
    I'm about 4 years into my current campaign. The party is 6th, just about 7th, level. We've played probably 80 evenings in that period. I plan the campaign to finish around 13th level, which would be at this rate in another 3-4 years time. The format, per the questionnaire I handed out before the campaign began and it was in its planning stages, is in more of the adventure path mode, and the overall story arc and setting is my own. But as an aid to reduce the time I spend in preparation, there have been and will be a number of elements that came out of pregenerated adventures.

    The initial few nights play involving the players fleeing from a tsunami, attempting to rescue survivors, and then fighting in a pitched night time battle against an army of deep ones was entirely my own. But then the next chapter involved a slight rewriting of the adventure 'Of Sound Mind', which is among the better 1st level adventures you'll find. The original adventure had a psionic theme, but my overall story arc was about necromancy. With a bit of rewriting, the necromancy theme replaced the psionic theme. I also fleshed out the dungeon to some degree, adding more rooms and encounters everywhere and a larger caverns complex. In order to integrate the story into my larger work, I had the BBEG from the adventure be mere mini-boss minions of my main BBEG. My central BBEG's were given a role in the story of having organized the original expedition as part of the attempt to acquire various artifacts they needed for the project which is central to the story and which the players have not yet fully comprehended.

    After that, the next chapter was largely based off some hints at the end 'Of Sound Mind' for further adventures. I placed cultist allies in the town who had designs on melting down the magic bell that is featured in the module, because the main BBEG needed the metals for his own powerful artifact creation. This played out as something of a murder mystery leading to the PCs attempting to thwart a heist, and finally a climatic battle with another mini-boss in a foundry complex. Technically nothing here was published and I did all the work myself, but the ideas were suggested by the module and the work I'd done detailing and expanding on the NPCs in the town.

    After that the PCs had a choice of which leads to follow, but decided first to head back to the Capitol to refit. In many ways, this amounted to an incidental choice. Here I brought in ideas from the Dungeon module, 'Mad God's Key'. Although I had to rewrite large sections of the module to move it from its setting to my homebrew world, change things to my taste, make it more level appropriate to my now 3rd level PC's, and integrate it into my story, the fundamental ideas behind the encounters - the boat chase, the thieves lair, the ancient tomb - could all be appropriated. Again, the story was connected to the larger story by the evil cults attempts to acquire necromantic knowledge.

    After this, there followed a fairly long sequence where I was all on my own, in what was really the first mega-dungeon of the story - the lesser and greater catacombs of Amalteen - of which only a tiny portion where explored (by design, since much that was in the greater catacombs was far beyond the PC's level). There I borrowed an idea from 'Return to the Tomb of Horrors', that of the Blackfire of Moil, repurposed and reflavored again to my game world, and made the object of the bad guy's quest which the good guys would have to thwart. This led ultimately to the revealing of the next mini-boss, and a series of encounters with him (and his signature hellhounds) and the eventual destruction of the Dark Fire in the outer chambers of a Lich king before the bad guys could acquire a sample.

    At that point the PC's were lagging in treasure and XP from what I needed, so I wrote up another adventure of my own design largely as a sidequest concerning a town beset by marauding Perytons and an ancient cursed treasure. The seeds of that had been set when I'd detailed the regional map and decided in a cursory way what sort of dungeons and challenges could be found on it.

    After a few more encounters suggested by story events, mostly regarding the war triggered between the PC's nation and a rival by the tsunami, we moved the setting to a new larger and more perilous city. Most of what I've had to write there is original, but I borrowed a couple of rooms from Mona's excellent 'The Whispering Cairn' - including his infamous face trap - to flesh out one of the several dungeons. The full module wasn't suited to my needs as by this time the party was hot on the trail of the bad guys. But certainly many of the decorations of this other larger cairn would have been familiar to anyone familiar with Mona's, only this one was the lair of an evil cult.

    From here, I'm planning after the party goes through another dungeon of my design and finally meets the real BBEG, to use 'X1: Isle of Dread' as the next stage in the parties 'anti-treasure hunt' (they are going around destroying treasures before the villains can get them). In this case, the villains will be after the famous black pearl, the last piece they need to complete their 'deadly world destroying weapon'. Again, I'll have to almost completely rewrite the original and expand on it greatly, but the central ideas give me a firm starting point.

    Anyway, at some level you could say this was the following adventure path:

    Of Sound Mind
    Mad God's Key
    The Whispering Cairn
    The Isle of Dread

    And at some level, it's none of those.

    As I'm not the best storywriter I was thinking about if some of you out there has some concepts, ideas, methods on how to build good adventures.
    Hard work. There is no other substitute. You must pour over your setting again and again working details into it with sweat the way a sculpture works details into stone. You must with sweat and blood smith words on to paper. I wish I had better news for you; but that's the size of it. For your own sanity, slow down the pace of leveling and with it the need to reinvent everything.

    In general, start by writing what has happened and what the bad guys have been doing and what they want to do. This should take about a page. Be detailed like you were writing background for a PC or a write up of your own adventures. This is the master copy of the story from which future events will proceed. Notice the story is set in the past, the rest is intention but will be subject to change based on what the PC's do.

    Then make a map of the region, and mark a few points of prominence and briefly note what you think might live there - were-boars, saughin, storm giants, perytons, wyvern, etc. - even if you don't think you'll use them.

    Figure out from your master copy what flaws and weaknesses the bad guys have. What clues have they inevitably left. What logistics do they have that are unavoidable and might leave breadcrumbs to their door. What minions that might be unreliably are they reliant on. What plots have they attempted that might have failed. What enemies have they made - unpaid debts, betrayals, jealous rivals, family of victims. What big visible calamities might they cause just as the PCs are at the right place at the wrong time? These are your plot hooks that you'll dangle in front of your PCs until they bite one.

    From their, design lairs. Keep them small. Anything over 25 rooms is too much. I've a post on dungeon design here: http://www.enworld.org/forum/showthr...l=1#post212975

    Now for every bad guy briefly describe in a few sentences 1-2 NPCs that aren't part of the bad guys plot but which are the natural sort of people you'd think inhabit the region the bad guys are living in. Also design a few wandering encounter tables for your regions to make them seem more lively. Generate weather by your favorite means, and put a few events on a calendar.

    If you do that, you should be good to go. Doing it right takes 1-2 hours of preparation for each hour you plan to play - more if you are sandboxing.

    Periodicly write out every unanswered question in your campaign you can think of, particularly as it pertains to NPC motivations and plots. Try to answer this as best as you can. The 'DM emulator' mentioned above seems to be an attempt to formalize this process, but I note it doesn't (and can't) do any of the hard work which is coming up with the concrete details.

    And one last thing: I'm quite good at improvising and using instant ideas at the table.
    I always hear this and yet I've never met anyone that actually is. It's just impossible to think on the fly that quickly. What I think people mean is, "I never think very deeply about the game I'm running until I'm actually running it, and then I surprise myself by the things I come up with." I'd encourage you to not take too much pride in improvisation. All that improvising you do at the table, you can do away from it as well, and then you'll find that you have more tools and ideas for improvising with.
    Last edited by Celebrim; Friday, 21st March, 2014 at 04:22 PM.

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    As far as coming up with the big idea, the main story the campaign will be about, that comes from thinking deep thoughts.

    Fantasy is about big ideas and particularly about good and evil. If you want to write good fantasy, you have to think long and hard on what it means to be good or evil in your best opinion.

    So for example, the current campaign against the Esoteric Order of the Golden Globe came about from an essay I wrote for my own benefit on the heretical cults that inhabited by game world. I tried to sympathize with the cults and why their members might feel as they did and what complaints that they might have that could be considered legitimate. Then I tried to imagine how that complaint could be posed as a moral dilemma, in this case, "Do the ends justify the means?" and "What is justice?"

    Another campaign I want to run is about the question, "What is the relative merit of stopping present suffering compared to preventing future suffering?", or put another way, "What about the messes we leave or children in out of otherwise noble desires to protect them?"

    Another campaign I began running at one time and might like to revisit is about the question, "Is it ever right to rob the rich to give to the poor?", and concerns economic and social inequities in the wake of an otherwise just revolution.

    And again, I have a campaign idea that involves considering the values and dangers of tolerating antisocial or simply just abnormal behavior in a society, and the relative merits of tolerance and intolerance.

    Pretty much any question you are interested in can be posed as a fantasy conflict.

  8. #8
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    My DMing method has been almost exclusively using pre-written modules (aka the "bricks" as Olgar defined them), while creating and improvising the mortar that holds those bricks together. This current campaign I am in has adapted critical-hits.com's 5x5 method of campaign design to create the threads of the campaign.

    In a nutshell...

    - I selected 5 to 7 modules I had that all related to the theme of my campaign ("incursion of the Far Realm" with The Gates of Firestorm Peak mega-adventure as the climax of the campaign).

    - I wrote out the plot of each of those modules in bulletpoint form (trying to get to about 5 bulletpoints when possible.)

    - I inserted those bulletpoints into the 5x5 grid with each module a column (earliest points at the bottom, finales across the top)

    - I then started looking for connections between bulletpoints in the grid between the modules. Are two plot bulletpoints kind of the same point? Do two plot points take place in what could be the same location? Do two points involve the same type of action the PCs will undertake?

    - Once I had this diagrammed out (where I could see where one module's throughline could drop hints or jump over to another module's throughline), I had rough connections between all the modules in my campaign.

    - I created my own connecting mortar to give PCs something to follow as they might move from one module to another.

    As an example...

    One of my modules was Prey For Smiley Bob from Dungeon Magazine. It involves the kidnapping of a couple halflings by a band of goblins. Another one of my modules was Starhaunt (also from Dungeon Magazine) where a stellar observatory that had been in contact with the Far Realm star creatures was sacrificing kidnapped victims to bring star spawn into the world.

    Having these two modules, it was thus easy to connect them by saying that the halfling victims from Smiley Bob were grabbed so that they could be picked up by the astronomers from Starhaunt and brought to the observatory. When the PCs rescued the halflings from the goblins and found out that the slaver from the observatory was due to arrive in another day or so... they hung around and waited and took the slaver (and his guards) out when he arrived (and thus found journals and paperwork indicating what was going on at the observatory.) The PCs then moved seamlessly from one module into the next.

    Hope that helps a little!
    Last edited by DEFCON 1; Friday, 21st March, 2014 at 04:13 PM.

  9. #9
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    First of all: A big Thank you to all of you All answers are very helpful and I haven't imagined that much helpful response. So again: Thank you very much

    Quote Originally Posted by Olgar Shiverstone View Post
    Consider first how to use pre-written material to save you some work. It has sites, maps, pre-keyed locations, stat blocks, etc. Many have shorter adventure elements within a larger adventure that can be harvested. They are bricks for your campaign -- you're building a cathedral so you don't want to take time focusing on building bricks.

    [...]

    One of the important things to do when planning this way it not to plan too far ahead. You don't need a detailed plan for an entire campaign. You just need a general concept, and a detailed plan that goes about two steps ahead of your players.
    This is such a nice idea! That gives me some guidance on how to work with the pregenerated content
    But one thing: Do you have some ideas for campaign, pre-generated content which is good to use that way? At the moment I have a book with plenty of plot ideas and the WotC D&D 4e Adventure Path (which I consider not that good). I also have the Zeitgeist and War of the Burning Sky Stuff.
    Maybe take a look at the Pathfinder campaing paths for this?
    At the end I'm a little bit worried that I will "destroy" good campaings with my own ideas So that I will think "maybe it's a good idea to play the campaign directly", but that brings me to the problem that the pre-written campaigns are not fitted good enough to the certain group...

    Quote Originally Posted by Quickleaf View Post
    Can you give an example of how your ideas are not worked out and go wrong in play? You mention below that you spoil big secrets...is that what you mean? That you end up tipping your hand as DM too early?
    I think I've used the word "spoil" wrong. I mean that in my previous campaigns (which were not fantasy, but Shadowrun) I've tried to be "too epic". That means I've overdrawn everything. It becomes too... yeah... lets say "unrealistic", in the case that I wanted too much. There was not enough focus and no red line.
    Quote Originally Posted by Quickleaf View Post
    Before we go much further, could you really clarify what you mean by "not the best story writer"? Folks have all kinds of ideas about what 'Story' means in regards to RPGs, so it would be good to get a better sense of where you're coming from first.
    Yeah... It's hard too clarify this. But I think my stories are too "flat". They have not enough depth.
    And I think this is connected too the point above, that I wanted too much and not focused on the important parts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Quickleaf View Post
    You sound like the kind of DM who'd do really well with a one-page adventure flowchart in front of you, and not much else needed. But that's just a hunch.
    Yeah. That could very well the case

    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Marley View Post
    Are your players proactive? Are you good at taking notes? If so, you might want to check out Mythic: Game Master Emulator. The system is designed to help DMs generate an interesting, dynamic narrative with an emphasis on improvisation. Black Vulmea did an excellent write-up of a session on his blog Really Bad Eggs. Essentially, your planning is simply reviewing your notes from the previous sessions. It is a great system and one that I am currently using for my own campaign.
    This Mythic thing looks very interesting. I will take a look at it. Maybe it helps, maybe not. But it's worth trying Thanks for the link.

    Quote Originally Posted by shidaku View Post
    Depending on how "full" the world you're starting with is there are simple things:
    That's also something which gives my guidance. Some starting point to invent own things

    Quote Originally Posted by Celebrim View Post
    Hard work. There is no other substitute. You must pour over your setting again and again working details into it with sweat the way a sculpture works details into stone. You must with sweat and blood smith words on to paper. I wish I had better news for you; but that's the size of it. For your own sanity, slow down the pace of leveling and with it the need to reinvent everything.

    In general, start by writing what has happened and what the bad guys have been doing and what they want to do. This should take about a page. Be detailed like you were writing background for a PC or a write up of your own adventures. This is the master copy of the story from which future events will proceed. Notice the story is set in the past, the rest is intention but will be subject to change based on what the PC's do.

    Then make a map of the region, and mark a few points of prominence and briefly note what you think might live there - were-boars, saughin, storm giants, perytons, wyvern, etc. - even if you don't think you'll use them.

    Figure out from your master copy what flaws and weaknesses the bad guys have. What clues have they inevitably left. What logistics do they have that are unavoidable and might leave breadcrumbs to their door. What minions that might be unreliably are they reliant on. What plots have they attempted that might have failed. What enemies have they made - unpaid debts, betrayals, jealous rivals, family of victims. What big visible calamities might they cause just as the PCs are at the right place at the wrong time? These are your plot hooks that you'll dangle in front of your PCs until they bite one.

    From their, design lairs. Keep them small. Anything over 25 rooms is too much. I've a post on dungeon design here: http://www.enworld.org/forum/showthr...l=1#post212975

    Now for every bad guy briefly describe in a few sentences 1-2 NPCs that aren't part of the bad guys plot but which are the natural sort of people you'd think inhabit the region the bad guys are living in. Also design a few wandering encounter tables for your regions to make them seem more lively. Generate weather by your favorite means, and put a few events on a calendar.

    If you do that, you should be good to go. Doing it right takes 1-2 hours of preparation for each hour you plan to play - more if you are sandboxing.

    Periodicly write out every unanswered question in your campaign you can think of, particularly as it pertains to NPC motivations and plots. Try to answer this as best as you can. The 'DM emulator' mentioned above seems to be an attempt to formalize this process, but I note it doesn't (and can't) do any of the hard work which is coming up with the concrete details.
    Very long and detailed answer! Thanks for that much work There are so many good points in it. I think I have to read your post a few other times when I'm working on my campaign

    Quote Originally Posted by DEFCON 1 View Post
    My DMing method has been almost exclusively using pre-written modules (aka the "bricks" as Olgar defined them), while creating and improvising the mortar that holds those bricks together. This current campaign I am in has adapted critical-hits.com's 5x5 method of campaign design to create the threads of the campaign.
    Sounds like a very nice method. A little bit similar too something called "plot matrix method" which I've read a while ago.
    I put the link on my reading list

    best regards

  10. #10
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    @plancktum
    Ah, not being able to draw the red line. Yeah, in fiction writing there is an idea called "Kill Your Babies". I forget who first came up with it, by the idea is to be suspicious of your first impulse, examine what you've written objectively later, and apply a mean editing hand.

    One of the really nice ways for controlling that tendency is using the "Fronts" from Dungeon World. Uh, there's a Dungeon World SRD for free on the net that describes what a "Front" is in more detail, but the gist is a discrete conflict/threat that the players will face. For a given adventure you probably only want 1 or 2 Fronts, and for a campaign 3-5 is about right. A good technique to self-edit is to say: Ok, I have # this many Fronts in my campaign and here's what they are... Any idea I come up with that doesn't fit into one of these fronts (or is clearly related to a PC or logically draws from last game session) gets the red pen. Cut it out.

    If you're looking for recommendations of good adventures, I recommend any of the stuff by Open Design (Wolfgang Baur): http://www.wolfgangbaur.com/projects/ These tend to be really evocative adventure settings with plenty of hooks so you can bring the PCs in at various points of entry.

    As for "seat of your pants" DMing, which sounds like your strength, if you're playing 4e(which it sounds like you are), I've got a 4e DM Cheat Sheet designed just for that over here:
    http://www.enworld.org/forum/showthr...DM-Cheat-Sheet
    Last edited by Quickleaf; Saturday, 22nd March, 2014 at 12:16 AM.

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