Jonathan Tweet: Prologue to Third Edition - Page 14
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  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Tweet View Post
    That's true. The game has fewer feel-bad results now, but that means that you're not afraid that the monsters will make you feel bad.
    I kind of want some of that old school stuff back, energy drain not so much but maybe inflicting exhaustion levels 5E terms. Its not permanent but you suck getting hit more than once or twice.

    You guys worked on the old D&DM game? Was thinking of stealing some ideas from that such as your magic/spell resistance system in it. Also have reread the 2E players option books again and there is some cool stuff in them conceptually some of which seemed to make its way to 3E. The problem was the label I think players option, as DM tools it could be very useful such as point buy classes and races.

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by R_Chance View Post
    I don't know, I always found it pretty easy to figure out when and where the PCs would, or would not have time or opportunity to rest and recover.
    Yes, I am not surprised that your experience would be different from mine. An individual DM can control and pace things in a way that a game designer or a scenario designer can't. If a party's power level over time correlates to the number of rests they take, a DM can balance things on the fly, but a scenario publisher can't rely on each DM getting it right.

  3. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenmarable View Post
    Balancing as a DM and balancing as a game designer are entirely different things.
    I see you explained this for me before I did, so thanks.

  4. #134
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    IDK if the HP as attrition mode a'la 3E-5E works that well.

    OSR may have sucked but it kind of worked better for a smaller number of encounters and even something basic could be a threat like a giant bee with its poison.

    Hexcrawls don't tend to work to well with the 1 encounter every few days thing.

    All modern D&D has struggled with it, OSR kinda works but only looks good by comparison.

    Gary's games seemed to have an element of gotcha in it due to how his players played the game.

  5. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zardnaar View Post
    IDK if the HP as attrition mode a'la 3E-5E works that well.
    Hp, alone, as attrition mode never worked well - it's spell slots that were the critical resource from the beginning through 3e, and are, again, in 5e.

    3e just made it obvious by letting you buy wands filled with 550 hps. ::shrug::

  6. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Tweet View Post
    Yes, I am not surprised that your experience would be different from mine. An individual DM can control and pace things in a way that a game designer or a scenario designer can't. If a party's power level over time correlates to the number of rests they take, a DM can balance things on the fly, but a scenario publisher can't rely on each DM getting it right.
    Thanks for the explanation (which I also received from another poster as well). I do my own scenarios which probably contributes to the relative ease of balancing them. Still, the one thing you can count on; some DMs will get it wrong
    XP Jonathan Tweet gave XP for this post

  7. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenmarable View Post
    Depends on what you mean. As a DM, I don't have much trouble balancing it for my particular group, either.

    However, as a game designer, that variable is far out of their control. them. *snip*
    He replied and it seems he was talking as a game designer and (commercial) adventure designer. I'm still not sure I agree on his points (I design and run my own adventures -- I don't use commercially produced ones). But you were right on what he was talking about. Thanks.

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    For what it's worth, and in full knowledge of the fact that it's largely what brought down the TSR business model, I actually really miss the settings from 2E. The setting books we've got for 5E are nothing compared to the 2E setting boxed sets. Not sustainable, as history showed, but they were so much fun to read through and the maps, inserts, etc were a big part of what made D&D feel like D&D in my early days in the hobby. I feel like that depth is a lot of what's missing from 5E. Wish there was a way to bring that back in a way that doesn't split the market.

  9. #139
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    Thank you for the article, Jonathan---a fun read. I'm looking forward to hearing more about the history of the development of Ars Magica, too!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Tweet View Post
    So it was that in 1997 I was working on a faux-Greek-myth RPG, inspired in part by Xena: Warrior Princess. The idea was that the gods were all oppressive jerks, and the player-characters were all rebel demigods, the half-mortal children of the bullies theyre fighting. Half-gods as player-characters seem like a good nichepowerful enough to feel formidable, aligned with the common people against the elites, connected to a recognizable deity such as Ares or Zeus, and hailed as heroes while being outsiders to everyday life. But before I got anything up and running, Wizards bought D&D and the game of Greek half-gods got shelved.
    Was this a precursor to the Rivals of Esthedil campaign for TPO?

    Allan.

  10. #140
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    @ grodog. Posts on Ars Magica are on their way! Rivals of Esthedil was 19931994, and the half-gods concept was 1997. Rivals of Esthedil was going to be about top-level mortals claiming a mini-plane for themselves, so the PCs were the bosses, not the insurgents.

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