DM tip - ask everyone what they're doing before you resolve what each person is doing

I find this is really common and feels frustrating as a player. Combat ends and the DM asks "Ok, so what is everyone doing?" and there's always that race for the least shameless player to declare "I rush to the corpse / vault / etc." and the DM will often follow with "OK. You find this, this and that." instead of "Ok and what is everyone else doing?"
The order which you resolve things matters, and not just for loot. Giving players a chance to say what they're doing before you give each individual character time to resolve each thing removes the race to do things first.
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Lanefan

Victoria Rules
I find this is really common and feels frustrating as a player. Combat ends and the DM asks "Ok, so what is everyone doing?" and there's always that race for the least shameless player to declare "I rush to the corpse / vault / etc." and the DM will often follow with "OK. You find this, this and that." instead of "Ok and what is everyone else doing?"
At some tables it's assumed that everyone follows (in this case) the looter, and helps out.
The order which you resolve things matters, and not just for loot.
Only in situations of finders-keepers. Most (well, actually all) parties I've ever seen put their loot into a common treasury, to be shared out when back in town. If something in treasury is obviously useful in the field it's loaned to someone who can use it, on the clear understanding they don't (yet) own it.
Giving players a chance to say what they're doing before you give each individual character time to resolve each thing removes the race to do things first.
Only to a point.

And it sure beats the alternative, where the question "What is everyone doing?" is answered only by crickets chirping in the distance...
 

Horwath

Adventurer
I find this is really common and feels frustrating as a player. Combat ends and the DM asks "Ok, so what is everyone doing?" and there's always that race for the least shameless player to declare "I rush to the corpse / vault / etc." and the DM will often follow with "OK. You find this, this and that." instead of "Ok and what is everyone else doing?"
The order which you resolve things matters, and not just for loot. Giving players a chance to say what they're doing before you give each individual character time to resolve each thing removes the race to do things first.
This is more a problem that you players need to sort out.

Make out-of-game or in-game conversation how your group acts before, in and after combat.

If you are an adventure party, there needs to be some order in it.
 

Coroc

Adventurer
I think OP did not only mean the loot=first comes first served situation.

It is like situations when the party opens a door to another dungeon area, and it is unclear whether the door is now open and potential enemies can act because they see the party e,g,

Player A : I open the door

DM: ok you get attacked by a mob, first round is surprise then roll initiative...

Player B: I wanted to listen on the door first!

Happens a lot at my tables, maybe roll initiative for some actions like this. But at least listen to everybody before deciding so the OPs advice is valuable.
 

Horwath

Adventurer
I think OP did not only mean the loot=first comes first served situation.

It is like situations when the party opens a door to another dungeon area, and it is unclear whether the door is now open and potential enemies can act because they see the party e,g,

Player A : I open the door

DM: ok you get attacked by a mob, first round is surprise then roll initiative...

Player B: I wanted to listen on the door first!

Happens a lot at my tables, maybe roll initiative for some actions like this. But at least listen to everybody before deciding so the OPs advice is valuable.
I would say that it would be the 1st option.
Player B has the best position to listen how player A opens the door :D

Exploration action also should be set in conversation in advance.

I.E. character A is the scout and he tries to do perception at every door/tunnel corner and possible also look for traps.

character B is the rear scout so no one sneaks behind the party.

character C draws the map,

character D searches for any food to supplement their rations....

etc...
 
This is part of the reason why I try to use an advanced version of the exploration rules in dungeons. The players have a standard set of actions for moving in corridors, resolving doors/traps, and investigating rooms. If a player wants to change their role, they simply let me know before we resolve. This also keeps players from talking over each other, and preventing one person from hogging the spotlight during exploration.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
I resolve it by asking the players to figure it out like sensible people. There's X to be found, how do you all divvy it up? Gold generally gets split up evenly, they talk amongst themselves and figure out who gets what when it comes to magic items.

I also don't really bother with placing loot any more, I just hand it out at the end of the session - with exceptions for items they could miss or magic items that could be useful immediately.
 

dnd4vr

Keeper of the Seven Keys
I find this is really common and feels frustrating as a player. Combat ends and the DM asks "Ok, so what is everyone doing?" and there's always that race for the least shameless player to declare "I rush to the corpse / vault / etc." and the DM will often follow with "OK. You find this, this and that." instead of "Ok and what is everyone else doing?"
The order which you resolve things matters, and not just for loot. Giving players a chance to say what they're doing before you give each individual character time to resolve each thing removes the race to do things first.
I would say this is definitely a table problem. Every game I've played it has the DM ask what everyone is doing and then based on their responses decides the order. If I played at your table I would certainly voice your concern.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
I think OP did not only mean the loot=first comes first served situation.

It is like situations when the party opens a door to another dungeon area, and it is unclear whether the door is now open and potential enemies can act because they see the party e,g,

Player A : I open the door

DM: ok you get attacked by a mob, first round is surprise then roll initiative...

Player B: I wanted to listen on the door first!

Happens a lot at my tables, maybe roll initiative for some actions like this. But at least listen to everybody before deciding so the OPs advice is valuable.
Had this happen a lot in my 1 to 2E days. After various and long gripe sessions, I made each group come up with an Standard Operating Procedure. So
1. Thieves um both rogues check out every 10 foot square, while the mapper draws the map.
2. Rogues always check out all doors and chest before anything is moved open.
3. the meat shields go in first after getting the okay for the thief'
etc
So then I just had to draw out the room on the map. Tell Coroc to give me a investigation or perception roll. If he failed and if Lanefan was playing that night his rogue rolled. EVEN IF THE WHOLE TABLE KNEW THEY BOTH ROLLED UNDER 5. Jasper's Barbarian would open the door and take the glyph of warding in the face.
 

jgsugden

Adventurer
Just think of it as still being round by round activity. A player might rush to the fallen enemy and grab something off of it, but they can't check it over entirely in 6 seconds.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
I resolve it by asking the players to figure it out like sensible people. There's X to be found, how do you all divvy it up? Gold generally gets split up evenly, they talk amongst themselves and figure out who gets what when it comes to magic items.

I also don't really bother with placing loot any more, I just hand it out at the end of the session - with exceptions for items they could miss or magic items that could be useful immediately.
oofta when I was homebrewing I had three different methods of dividing loot.
1. GP/# of pc. Magic goes to who can use it best.
2. GP/ (# of pcs +1 for the kitty) magic is decided at time of finding. Kitty was use as bank for the pcs.
3. He who find it can keep it. This one generally got change quick.
 

tommybahama

Explorer
And it sure beats the alternative, where the question "What is everyone doing?" is answered only by crickets chirping in the distance...
The silence is always shorter than you think. I'd rather the players be thoughtful rather than blurt out the first fool idea that comes to their head. The problem is when the GM feels he needs to fill in the gaps.

Had this happen a lot in my 1 to 2E days.
You didn't have a party caller back then?
 

iserith

Magic Wordsmith
I find this is really common and feels frustrating as a player. Combat ends and the DM asks "Ok, so what is everyone doing?" and there's always that race for the least shameless player to declare "I rush to the corpse / vault / etc." and the DM will often follow with "OK. You find this, this and that." instead of "Ok and what is everyone else doing?"
The order which you resolve things matters, and not just for loot. Giving players a chance to say what they're doing before you give each individual character time to resolve each thing removes the race to do things first.
It sounds like your party is in competition with each other instead of cooperating. Or some combination of the two but the competition bit is not friendly. That's something worth examining and working on in my view.
 

ccs

40th lv DM
The order which you resolve things matters, and not just for loot. Giving players a chance to say what they're doing before you give each individual character time to resolve each thing removes the race to do things first.
I don't care if they race to be 1st. I care about knowing if there's some effect that'll be involved simultaneous with actions.
X might be looting the corpse, Y is on guard looking down the passage ahead, but what is Z poking at over in the corner....

So yeah, I need a statement from everybody 1st so that I know how to describe things.
 

ccs

40th lv DM
oofta when I was homebrewing I had three different methods of dividing loot.
1. GP/# of pc. Magic goes to who can use it best.
2. GP/ (# of pcs +1 for the kitty) magic is decided at time of finding. Kitty was use as bank for the pcs.
3. He who find it can keep it. This one generally got change quick.
Why is how the party divides the loot your problem? As the DM you did your job. You put the loot into play. How the party chooses to divvy it up should be all on them.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
Far more common at my table:

Player 1: I Do the Thing.
Player 2: ...and I help!
Player 3: ...and I cast guidance!
Player 4: ...and I cast bless!
Player n: ...and I (also grant advantage and/or a bonus somehow).
DM: Okay, roll a ridiculous number of dice and pick your favorite result.
Player 1: ...rats, I only got an eight. Um, fifteen total?
DM: Unfortunately you--
Player 2: (interrupting) I DO THE THING INSTEAD!
Player 3: (also interrpting) I ALSO HELP!
Player 4: (also interrupting) I ALSO CAST GUIDANCE!
Player n: (also interrupting) AND I DO SOMETHING TOO!

And round and round we go for 15 minuts, until for the nth time, they finally let me finish explaining that the Thing was empty all along.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
The silence is always shorter than you think. I'd rather the players be thoughtful rather than blurt out the first fool idea that comes to their head. The problem is when the GM feels he needs to fill in the gaps.



You didn't have a party caller back then?
yes I did. But with moves, player changes etc. I would have explain to the new people what it was. BEEP in my first homebrew 5e where I was a player I wish we had a party caller. But the rest of group did not want one. Hey one old couple said, "Me and my spouse can spend 4 hours deciding on which direction to take!"
***
For those not wanting to read the link rant. A party caller is bob not bob's happy go lucky cleric but bob. Bob decides if the group goes left, right,. Bob makes minor decisions for the group. If Bob is a great caller, he may start telling the group what they do. The thief goes long, the paladin pumps fake the ball to the cleric, the cleric takes the 98 bus to the 7-11 and fakes a punt. Generally if the party started stalling the action in or out of combat Bob would give the dm the plan.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I actually think this is a very good policy. Not just to avoid conflicts where the players rush to be the first to loot the body/open the chest/open the door/etc. but just to insure everyone gets a chance to contribute before an action gets resolved. You never know when someone’s contribution might change the result, and while they could stop you if they think what they want to do might have an effect, I think it’s better to structure the conversation of the game in such a way where that won’t be necessary.

It used to be that this was a player responsibility. The party was supposed to designate a caller, who’s role was to relay the party’s actions to the DM. Instead of everyone talking one-on-one with the DM about what their characters were doing and resolving those individual actions, the players discussed amongst themselves what they wanted to do, came up with a plan, and then the caller relayed that to the DM to resolve all together. I don’t know if that’s necessarily the best procedure to follow, but it does have some advantages over the individual action resolution model, which I think asking each player what they do before proceeding to resolution could recapture.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
yes I did. But with moves, player changes etc. I would have explain to the new people what it was. BEEP in my first homebrew 5e where I was a player I wish we had a party caller. But the rest of group did not want one. Hey one old couple said, "Me and my spouse can spend 4 hours deciding on which direction to take!"
***
For those not wanting to read the link rant. A party caller is bob not bob's happy go lucky cleric but bob. Bob decides if the group goes left, right,. Bob makes minor decisions for the group. If Bob is a great caller, he may start telling the group what they do. The thief goes long, the paladin pumps fake the ball to the cleric, the cleric takes the 98 bus to the 7-11 and fakes a punt. Generally if the party started stalling the action in or out of combat Bob would give the dm the plan.
This is not my understanding of a caller’s role. Rather, I understood the caller to be the person who relayed the group’s action declarations to the DM.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker
This is not my understanding of a caller’s role. Rather, I understood the caller to be the person who relayed the group’s action declarations to the DM.
I think it probably varied from group to group. I didn't play enough 1E with large parties for it to be a part of my experience, but I remember it in the rules.
 

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