D&D 5E How do characters gain new proficiencies in your game?

How do characters gain new proficiencies in your game?

  • 1. Features.

    Votes: 14 58.3%
  • 2. Feats.

    Votes: 16 66.7%
  • 3. Downtime training.

    Votes: 15 62.5%
  • 4. Awards.

    Votes: 3 12.5%
  • 5. House-ruled every X levels.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 6. Other. Please explain.

    Votes: 2 8.3%

DND_Reborn

Legend
Just thinking, as usual, and wanted to ask how your group handles characters gaining new skill, language, tool, etc. proficiencies as they advance in level?

As a side question:

How do you feel about a higher-level PC who suddenly gains a proficiency being as good as a PC whose had the proficiency from day 1?

Thanks to all for responding. :)
 

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jgsugden

Legend
I have half-proficiency (equal to the bonus from Jack of All Trades). That can be gained via Downtime study. That is sufficient to allow you to attempt to perform skill checks that require proficiency in my game. I also allow a Proficient character to get to Proficiency Plus (proficiency bonus plus JoAT bonus) via Downtime study. Both of these require a roll to gain after a period of study (measured in 50 hour increments) with the DC dropping cumulatively. If you've already received this half bonus for another skill/tool, the DCs for the additional skill/tool rise. However, proficiency or expertise requires a feat, class abaility, etc... under the RAW.
 

Just thinking, as usual, and wanted to ask how your group handles characters gaining new skill, language, tool, etc. proficiencies as they advance in level?

As a side question:

How do you feel about a higher-level PC who suddenly gains a proficiency being as good as a PC whose had the proficiency from day 1?

Thanks to all for responding. :)

Feat will do it. As will some MCing.

They can also swap one skill for another (forgetting an old skill and learning another) on levelling via Tashas.

For tools and languages, I let them train as per Xanathars, but require an Int check (DC 15) or the time and money is wasted.
 


BookTenTiger

He / Him
I usually have one or two experts in each community who can train characters in proficiencies. It's a good way for characters to spend gold! Usually the training also takes one or more weeks of downtime.

In my last campaign, the characters came to a fortress where all the knights' memories had been stolen by an aboleth in an underground grotto. The characters had to find magical books in which the knights' memories had been magically scribed. Giving the book back to the knight restored their memories, and they then became experts who could train the characters in skills, tools, or languages. One knight could even train Wisdom Saving Throws, though it was very expensive.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
Usually through feats. But, I've been known to give them out as quest rewards. "In return for your bravery and kindness, the faerie queen gifts you with otherworldly knowledge of the forest. Your characters gain proficiency in Nature or Survival, your choice."
 

iserith

Magic Wordsmith
I don't usually offer skill or tool proficiency training as part of downtime, so characters will only pick up new proficiencies via feats or multiclassing (assuming those optional rules are in effect) or class features. It doesn't bother anyone in our groups in the least when someone adds a new skill or tool proficiency. It benefits the whole team.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Typically, tool and language proficiency can be gained thorugh downtime activity, per Tasha's rules.

For skills, I point players are the appropriate feats.
 

Downtime/Gold spent for skills. When it comes to something big/major or what not, such as an Elf PC getting their one-handed longsword Damage Die upgraded from a 1D8 to 1D10? Well, ya gotta find a Master Bladesinger for that one. Then if you manage to convince him/her to train you and meet the requirements, then the bump happens. Other major things would require something similar in being a major requirement to be met. (And of cours)


In regard to Skills: I try to have in three tiers: Half Proficiency/Your Full Proficiency/Double your Proficiency score. Yes, I understand that could be seen as stepping on the Jack of All Trades/Expertise thing that Bards/Rogues have but here's the thing: Bards/Rogues get Jack of All Trades/Expertise for free. Everyone else doesn't outside of Feat usage. Plus, even though gold/downtime is required, the gold price/etc keeps on going up per tier, so PCs looking to "master all the skills" this way would have to not only stay alive for that long in their Adventuring career but also have the constant gold upkeep to get training.
 


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