I'm reading the Forgotten Realms Novels- #34 The Ogre's Pact (Twilight Giants 1)

Salthorae

Imperial Mountain Dew Taster
Was it a Christmas novel/stocking filler?
Who's idea was it?
Why?

And.

WHY?
Probably because novels were a primary part of TSR revenue back then, so churning them out was worthwhile even if the novel itself wasn't per se. SOMEONE would buy it "because Volo" or "because FR" or "because TSR made a novel and the are D&D"

Especially since TSR was in financial trouble by the date this novel was published n '95.
 

Nebulous

Adventurer
#001 The Crystal Shard by RA Salvatore (Icewind Dale Trilogy Book 1)
Read 2/8/19 to 5/8/19


View attachment 114657

Yeah, I should have started with the Moonshae Trilogy but... I picked up all three of this series in a charity shop, and after reading this one the idea came about- don't stop here, read the lot, all of the Forgotten Realms novels.

Not a review but... Drizzt is as cool as everyone says, I so wanted to dislike him but alas, I do however now really want to find out how he escaped to the surface- what came before. Thanks Salvatore, first book and I'm hooked. Learned a lot about Icewind Dale and the Ten Towns, also lots of other good stuff about- Barbarians and their honour bound crazy ways, also nice power mad Wizard (being manipulated by the Crystal Shard), and plenty of other good stuff to recommend. Loved Bruenor (I heart Dwarves, what can I say- they're dependable) superb enemy- Errtu (the Balor).

Read!
Before he was a ridiculous cliche and a redundant parody of himself, Drizzt WAS very cool! I called him "DRIZ-ZIT" for many years before I heard it was pronounced "Drisst." For that matter, he was also a "DROE" not a DROW :)
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
#033 Once Around the Realms Guidebook by Brian Thomsen
Read 3/12/19 to 4/12/19
In contrast to your take on it, I found this book to be a lot of fun. It can't be taken seriously, of course, but that was the amusing part about it. Yeah, the premise is flimsy, the responses the characters have to their situations are ridiculous, and the various shout-outs are made in quick such quick succession that they're very clearly shout-outs, but that's part of what makes the thing such a fun time. This isn't a book that's supposed to be some sort of epic, nor have much in the way of high drama; it's the equivalent of a "popcorn flick," but in book form.

Also, I like to keep in mind that Volo is one of the favorites of Tymora (goddess of good luck), so that right there tells you all you need to know. :)
 

Goonalan

Adventurer
Kay, but as far as characters went it seemed to lean on/name-check or else somehow co-opt (read shoe-horn) in a variety of Realms names for no other purpose than...

Same with the refs to modern fiction, Jaws et al- it all seemed so throwaway.

The scenarios played out were serious (in a Fantasy Fiction life or death for the characters style) but all pretty much worked out in the corniest way possible. I get that this isn't reality, and I get that you suspend belief (etc. etc.) but I'm attempting to buy in to a milieu here, and this book doesn't help.

As you say, it serves some other purpose- fun... not a dirty word, we all want fun- but my fun sorta isn't this.

It also left me wondering about the role of women in fantasy fiction at times, in particular the portrayal of Shurleen, and also the fat ugly ladies that even Passepout turned his nose up at.

It didn't send a shiver, and I get its from a different time- and the author didn't mess with other named strong women of the Realms but, I don't know- it felt wrong and bad at times.

As in the review, Volo was okay/good- the voice of reason, and the backbone to the plot et al.

Apologies, not trying to stir up trouble but I really didn't like it, not even as fun.

I've read whatever it is (32?) books in 125 days (or thereabouts) some of the others were slow, silly or... whatever (from my POV of course) but all the reviews (such as they are) I have left here find the positive (I think from memory- mostly). For me, there's no positive (up-side) to having read this.

Again not arguing against your opinion, just reasserting/defining mine.

Thanks as always for commenting, always appreciated.

Cheers goonalan
 
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Scrivener of Doom

Adventurer
I stopped reading the series after Descent into Darkness (or Siege of Darkness...it really didn't leave that good of an impression on me). Could barely finish that book. My problem with Drizzt is that he's the best at everything

He's the best swordsman (let's not forget that corkscrew maneuver), he's the fastest, etc. He stopped being compelling to me after the 2nd book of the prequel trilogy. I liked him fine in the Icewind Dale trilogy.
Agreed.

The Crystal Shard was a great piece of pulp fun. And then it all got worse.

I liken the Drizzt novels to George Lucas's prequels for Star Wars: A legendary series should stop when it devolves into an unfunny parody. Lucas had gungans; Salvatore has dwarves - both races are cognitively-challenged and recognised by their speech impediments.

But I still consider The Crystal Shard a guilty pleasure.
 

Raunalyn

Adventurer
Agreed.

The Crystal Shard was a great piece of pulp fun. And then it all got worse.

I liken the Drizzt novels to George Lucas's prequels for Star Wars: A legendary series should stop when it devolves into an unfunny parody. Lucas had gungans; Salvatore has dwarves - both races are cognitively-challenged and recognised by their speech impediments.

But I still consider The Crystal Shard a guilty pleasure.
Honestly, the entire Icewind Dale trilogy was a pleasure to read...it was fun, and Drizzt was actually an enjoyable character before he became the Gary Stu to end all Gary Stu's.
 

tglassy

Adventurer
I still enjoyed all the Drizzt books that came later. The Crystal Shard trilogy was my least favorite of them, so I don’t know what y’all are talking about. Drizzt isn’t a Gary Stu. He’s the hero. He makes mistakes. He goes through problems. He just wins. Cause that’s what heroes do.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Drizzt didnt really drop in quality IMHO until perhaps the silent blade or maybe around The legacy YMMV.

DET and IWD are good AKA the 1st 6 at least as far as D&D novels go.

The Spine of the World is where Drizzt novels really started trending downward IMHO. Last two I read were semi awful. Something about Gauntlgrym and a vampire Dwarf (Pwent?).
 

Scrivener of Doom

Adventurer
(snip) Something about Gauntlgrym and a vampire Dwarf (Pwent?).
In my earlier post I mentioned that Lucas's gungans Salvatore's dwarves were brain-damaged and had speech impediments; I forget to mention that they almost uniformly have stupid names.

Thanks for the reminder.

RAS had access to Ed but he insisted on stupid names for so many characters when he could have simply said, "Hey, Ed, how do I make these characters sound like they belong in the Realms rather than in a session of Hackmaster?"

Honestly, the entire Icewind Dale trilogy was a pleasure to read...it was fun, and Drizzt was actually an enjoyable character before he became the Gary Stu to end all Gary Stu's.
I liked, as a guilty pleasure, The Crystal Shard and also enjoyed Streams of Silver. The Halfling's Gem, however, was when I thought the series and its characters began the decline of the character.

Drizzt's Gary Stu-ness was never an issue for me. It's everything else - including the interminable fight scenes - that just made me stop after about book 5 or 6 (I'm not including the Homeland trilogy in that count). Plus he never did grok the Realms, IMO.
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
Compared to Wulfgar's PTSD from his time in the abyss, his failed relationships, his hitting rock bottom, coming back from it, finding a family, and losing it again I just couldn't find Drizzt's own struggles to be that interesting.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Compared to Wulfgar's PTSD from his time in the abyss, his failed relationships, his hitting rock bottom, coming back from it, finding a family, and losing it again I just couldn't find Drizzt's own struggles to be that interesting.
I still have PTSD from reading Once Around the Realms. There's more fun things to do like drop concrete blocks on your foot.
 
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Goonalan

Adventurer
#034 The Ogre's Pact by Troy Denning (Twilight Giants 1)
Read 5/12/19 to 9/12/19


Forgotten Realms The Ogres Pact (Twilight Giants 1) a 30.jpg

That's better, much better than the last one.

So, Tavis the Firbolg tells no lies and always flies straight as an arrow, and he loves/adores Princess Brianna- he even looks after the orphans- the tough guy with a heart of gold. Princess Brianna (nearly seven foot tall and 18(00) Str) also loves the orphans, and Tavis, of course. But the course of true love never runs smooth.

Here's the first criticism, although I feel slightly churlish pointing this out because without the conceit the novel falls apart, here goes- twenty pages in (less) we know that Tavis has a heart of gold, Princess Brianna who knows Tavis better than anyone else in the novel still however has her doubts about the Firbolg. As stated- without her doubts then the rest of the novel kinda just falls apart, she has to doubt- so, suspend belief, and go on with it.

The rest just works- Brianna gets snatched by the Ogres and their leader/Shaman (is this guy a precursor to the Ogre Magi, he has the skills to pay the bills?) Goboka who has plans for the Princess- the rut? Then it's a chase to the finish with Tavis, Morten (a brutish Firbolg), Avner (12 year old male orphan/12th level Rogue), and my favourite Basil the (Socialist- all property is theft) Verbeeg Runecaster, and a red shirt earl at first go in pursuit of Brianna. Then after the rescue get chased (right back at yer) by Goboka and his Ogre-squad.

Oh, but they're not the Ogres I know and love- nasty, brutish and thick with it; so last season- these Ogres are bow specialists that hide in trees and go for the ambush. Odd- but hey, it kinda works.

The Hill Giants however, well... they're the same guys that squashed in to G1 Steading of the Hill Giant Chief, it's a wonder any of them survive to adulthood so dangerous is their day-to-day existence. We meet three Hill Giant guards as our guys, lead by Brianna, flee to the Hill Giant chiefs secret hideout- three pages later and one of the Hill Giants has pushed the other two off a cliff (to their deaths) and the presumption is they're mates. Brutal.

The fighting is great, the action is great, Goboka is great, Basil is great, Tavis is great- and more or less everything Brianna believes is wrong. Oh, and everything that Travis says is either true, correct or just plain smart.

Basil is too cool for school.

That's it really- you want there to be a happy ending, but I figure it can't come too soon- there's three books in this series, so medal, marriage and... majesty! At least not just yet.

Read.

Oh, and don't read anything in to the fact that it took me five days to read this (a long time for me) I managed to mislay the book for 36 hours- it fell out of my bag in the car and some how made its way to under the driver's seat. There followed a day and a bit of frantic searching every room in the house before, finally- the next morning, thinking to check in the car. Bingo!
 
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Seramus

Adventurer
My biggest issue with RAS isn't even Drizzt. It's how badly he handles spellcasters. It's genuinely painful to read at times because of how incompetent they are.

RAS eventually gets a little better with them, but not much.
 

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