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D&D 5E Ray Winninger mentions third project!

WotC's Ray Winninger has confirmed that another D&D release, by James Wyatt, will be released in between Witchlight (September) and Strixhaven (November). Strixhaven was Amanda Hamon's project, while Witchlight is Chris Perkins'. That assumes he's not referring to the Feywild accessory kit in September.

A lot of people are asking Qs about the [D&D] releases for the rest of this year.

Yes, WILD BEYOND THE WITCHLIGHT is the [Chris Perkins] story product I referenced in our dev blog. STRIXHAVEN is [Amanda Hamon's] project. We have not yet announced [James Wyatt's] project, which releases between WITCHLIGHT and STRIXHAVEN.

Why did we announce STRIXHAVEN so early? Pretty simple--there was no way to release the STRIX-related Unearthed Arcana without letting the cat out of the bag.

You'll learn a lot more about all of these products at D&D Live on G4, July 16 and 17. And yes, there is still a little surprise or two ahead.



 
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Ancient Egypt is pre-Islam and should be able to be done without offending modern beliefs and senses. Now, trying to redo Al-Qadim is a lot trickier, depending on the real-world time period you want to recreate with it. There can be a lot of bad blurring of the lines between the pre-Islam days of Arabian Nights and the early days of the existence of the religion. Making it about the same as the rest of the Realms for real world approximate centuries and there will need to be a lot of careful and thoughtful writing that has to be done to bring it up to 2021 standards.
DMs Guild released a Zakhara sourcebook a few months ago and it's pretty good (I've read through it myself, and agree it's well done):

Campaign Guide: Zakhara - Adventures in the Land of Fate (Al-Qadim and Forgotten Realms Sourcebook) - Dungeon Masters Guild | Dungeon Masters Guild

They made sure to have a person from the Middle East (Ahmad Aljabry, who is from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia) on board as a co-writer and cultural consultant.
 

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Wardook

Explorer
I could dig Spelljammer adventure. The actual ship that gave the setting its name. The party wakes up on board, perhaps even from different settings/spheres, they don't know each other but are thrown together. They can't control the ship. Would be easy to railroad the party and introduce them to the setting, space battles, the Rock, etc.. OMG what is all that "blackness outside the port a void?", to eventually "Is that a talking hippo, riding a space hamster?"
 

I could dig Spelljammer adventure. The actual ship that gave the setting its name. The party wakes up on board, perhaps even from different settings/spheres, they don't know each other but are thrown together. They can't control the ship. Would be easy to railroad the party and introduce them to the setting, space battles, the Rock, etc.. OMG what is all that "blackness outside the port a void?", to eventually "Is that a talking hippo, riding a space hamster?"
Metamorphosis Alpha, but in D&D.
 

DMs Guild released a Zakhara sourcebook a few months ago and it's pretty good (I've read through it myself, and agree it's well done):

Campaign Guide: Zakhara - Adventures in the Land of Fate (Al-Qadim and Forgotten Realms Sourcebook) - Dungeon Masters Guild | Dungeon Masters Guild

They made sure to have a person from the Middle East (Ahmad Aljabry, who is from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia) on board as a co-writer and cultural consultant.
Yeah, they put in a lot of work into that project, including retrofitting the idea of kits in. (If Mages of Strixhaven had come out beforehand, I'm guessing they might have used that approach instead.)

It's definitely possible to do this sort of work sensitively while still making it an engaging book for use at the table. The question, as always, is whether WotC is capable of doing so.
 



doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
It's doing well because VRG doesn't wallow in nostalgia, but stole the best ideas from old Ravenloft while cutting and remixing and expanding the setting to update it for the current day. To the loud complaints of many people on this forum, mind you. But if WotC did a Dragonlance setting book it would have to be exactly the same thing. Not a nostalgic revival but a reinvention that carries over all the good ideas while remaking it into something modern.

But let's be honest... what are the good ideas in Dragonlance? Most of the lingering attachment seems to be over the novels and their characters, not the ideas of the setting. The setting is a rotten mess, from the horrible races to the unusual moral cosmology. They'd be throwing out more than they're keeping, and at that point why even call it Dragonlance?
There’s a whole thread full of what folks want from DL.
 

see

Pedantic Grognard
far more likely than a revival of Kara Tur - a revival that changes lots of things risks angering fans of the original,
Are there, in fact, enough fans of Kara-Tur canon that angering them would matter?

The writing of the boxed set was dry and highly real-world-analog-ist (except insofar as it jammed the 1e OA classes into all the cultures). The setting never generated any product support beyond a few adventure modules, no novels (except insofar as one volume in the Horde trilogy concentrated on the conquest of Shou Lung), and no video/computer games (while Dragonlance, Mystara, Hollow World, Dark Sun, Ravenloft, Planescape, Zakhara, Birthright, Spelljammer and Eberron all have had at least one at some point). I don't know of any fan discussion anywhere except as either 1) an afterthought in FR fandom discussions, or 2) people explaining how it needs to be radically reworked. And, of course, it was in the "steep drop-off" category of setting popularity back when it was polled.

(This, of course, raises the question as to whether it's worth bothering with reviving rather than doing some other setting for Asian-accented fantasy. But the fact that it's attached to the Forgotten Realms creates a semi-eternal push to revisit it, with references getting made over and over again. And the events of the Avatar Crisis, Horde, Spellplague, and Second Sundering, including just the sheer passage of over 130 years in the FR timeline since the date of the information in the boxed set, would quite justify radical revisions.)
 
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Are there, in fact, enough fans of Kara-Tur canon that angering them would matter?

The writing of the boxed set was dry and highly real-world-analog-ist (except insofar as it jammed the 1e OA classes into all the cultures). The setting never generated any product support beyond a few adventure modules, no novels (except insofar as one volume in the Horde trilogy concentratted on the conquest of Shou Lung), and no video/computer games (while Dragonlance, Mystara, Hollow World, Dark Sun, Ravenloft, Planescape, Zakhara, Birthright, Spelljammer and Eberron all have had at least one at some point). I don't know of any fan discussion anywhere except as either 1) an afterthought in FR fandom discussions, or 2) people explaining how it needs to be radically reworked. And, of course, it was in the "steep drop-off" category of setting popularity back when it was polled.

(This, of course, raises the question as to whether it's worth bothering with reviving rather than doing some other setting for Asian-accented fantasy. But the fact that it's attached to the Forgotten Realms creates a semi-eternal push to revisit it, with references getting made over and over again. And the events of the Avatar Crisis, Horde, Spellplague, and Second Sundering, including just the sheer passage of over 130 years in the FR timeline since the date of the information in the boxed set, would quite justify radical revisions.)

Because it wasn't supposed to be apart of the poll and it's techniquely part of FR, it's votes likely were simply added to FRs.
 

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