D&D 5E Strixhaven: Curriculum of Chaos - I have no clue what this is about


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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
I wonder then if this was a group project? Is it a D&D adventure/setting based on the cards, or was the story/cards/book all worked on together?

My guess is that it's a D&D setting based on what the MtG folks did (like Theros and Ravnica were) and that this time the D&D folks got to see the card stuff in advance to get work done on it this quickly. I would be kind of surprised if the D&D folks had any input into the cards, or if the D&D folks felt bound by everything that was done with the cards. (The class names on the cards, for example, won't match the D&D classes).
 



Parmandur

Book-Friend
My guess is that it's a D&D setting based on what the MtG folks did (like Theros and Ravnica were) and that this time the D&D folks got to see the card stuff in advance to get work done on it this quickly. I would be kind of surprised if the D&D folks had any input into the cards, or if the D&D folks felt bound by everything that was done with the cards. (The class names on the cards, for example, won't match the D&D classes).
Yeah, as we know that D&D books have a 12-13 month timeline from start to finish, this book would have been started as the Magic Set was basically going to the printers after a couple years of work.
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
yeah... I'm old. Too old for that BS... but again, I can imagine having more adult players interact as teachers, alumni and advisors
Heh, I'm the other way. I'm too old for "I'm an adult now" to have sway, and the idea of doing college-age hi-jinx is a fun romp.

That said, unless they have a bunch of non-combat scene or challenge resolution rules, 5e isn't the system that provides mechanical support for that. And it being M:tG has no draw nor repulsion for me.
 

What I actually want to see is a table of contents. I was actually quite keen on seeing a wizard school setting like Strixhaven was originally touted as - it seemed like an interesting diversion from the standard and a way of expanding d&d in a new direction. But now they’re talking as if it’s a level 1-10 adventure book? As a player rather than a dm, a book which is mostly adventure rather than setting is of little use to me. I skipped Witchlight for the same reason, though Witchlight was of course always upfront about being an adventure book. I’m hoping I’m reading too much into this and that the book is still primarily a campaign setting.
 
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The short "pdf" version of the answer: Strixhaven is basically Magic the Gathering's version of Discount Harry Potter.

WoTC Answer: Strixhaven: Curriculum of Chaos is the third Magic the Gathering/DND crossover book following in the steps of the Guildmaster's Guide to Ravnica and Mythic Odysseys of Theros with the main theme of this crossover book being the idea of giving 5E DND players a Magical School/Academy type setting/playground. Apparently the book will be providing guidelines to establishing connections and what not with NPCs which seems to sound like an expansion of the Social Pillar aspect of 5E.
 

NotAYakk

Legend
What I actually want to see is a table of contents. I was actually quite keen on seeing a wizard school setting like Strixhaven was originally touted as - it seemed like an interesting diversion from the standard and a way of expanding d&d in a new direction. But now they’re talking as if it’s a level 1-10 adventure book? As a player rather than a dm, a book which is mostly adventure rather than setting is of little use to me. I skipped Witchlight for the same reason, though Witchlight was of course always upfront about being an adventure book. I’m hoping I’m reading too much into this and that the book is still primarily a campaign setting.
I can see a lot of utility presenting settings as adventures.

I mean, describing stuff is one thing, but describing stuff and what you could do interacting with it gives the description more of a point.
 

I can see a lot of utility presenting settings as adventures.

I mean, describing stuff is one thing, but describing stuff and what you could do interacting with it gives the description more of a point.
Oh, I get that. But as a player for a DM who mostly runs published modules, I don’t want to read an adventure that I might end up playing.
 
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Parmandur

Book-Friend
What I actually want to see is a table of contents. I was actually quite keen on seeing a wizard school setting like Strixhaven was originally touted as - it seemed like an interesting diversion from the standard and a way of expanding d&d in a new direction. But now they’re talking as if it’s a level 1-10 adventure book? As a player rather than a dm, a book which is mostly adventure rather than setting is of little use to me. I skipped Witchlight for the same reason, though Witchlight was of course always upfront about being an adventure book. I’m hoping I’m reading too much into this and that the book is still primarily a campaign setting.
The 1-10 campaign is apparently about a quarter of the book, IIRC, with 4 adventures 1 for every academic year. It is a Setting book, but they felt that the unique structure of an academic career as a campaign structure merited more fleshing out
 

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