What are you reading in 2022?

Nellisir

Adventurer
I've been off and on about reading fiction. I have been getting a lot of POD and similar RPG stuff, so I've been reading Dragonlance Adventures, Calimshan, Fiend Folio, Dawn of the Emperors, Hollow World, Monster Mythology, the original AND revised Forgotten Realms Campaign sets (I had the original once; I'd never had or read the revised so that was actually quite good), Demihuman Deities, Nod #35, Creature Cache (5 stars), Codex Germania, Codex Slavorum (2 stars, maybe), Iron Falcon rules, Bards Gate (the PF edition, but it was $19.95 so I absolutely don't care), and a few others I don't recall right now.
 

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Zaukrie

New Publisher
I've been off and on about reading fiction. I have been getting a lot of POD and similar RPG stuff, so I've been reading Dragonlance Adventures, Calimshan, Fiend Folio, Dawn of the Emperors, Hollow World, Monster Mythology, the original AND revised Forgotten Realms Campaign sets (I had the original once; I'd never had or read the revised so that was actually quite good), Demihuman Deities, Nod #35, Creature Cache (5 stars), Codex Germania, Codex Slavorum (2 stars, maybe), Iron Falcon rules, Bards Gate (the PF edition, but it was $19.95 so I absolutely don't care), and a few others I don't recall right now.
I mean, so much good fiction in those RPG books.
 

I finished Riggs' Slaying the Dragon. A fascinating read, and no doubt a new pillar in RPG historical works. Tightly researched, the book approaches the subject with a degree of empathy that never forgets that though this all happened decades ago, it happened to real people. And though it doesn't really go into it, I think it provides about as clear a window into what might have happened to D&D if Wizards hadn't bought the whole thing as I've seen.

Now I'm reading Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman's Dragons of Deceit.
 



Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Re-reading the SandmanGNs in preparation for binging the TV show... I read them as single issues back upon release. Re-reading them again as one long story, and having the benefit of knowing what is going to happen (roughly), I'm seeing a bunch of the foreshadowing that Gaiman was dropping all over the place that I missed on first read through with 30 days between each 22 pages.

Just read the issue in Doll's House that introduces Hob Gadling. That's still one of my favorite all time issues in all of comics - and I've read a lot of comics. It continues to hold up.
 

Just re-read the first Sandman graphic novel a few months ago and yeah, they're so dang good. It's a masterclass of storytelling.

Re-reading the SandmanGNs in preparation for binging the TV show... I read them as single issues back upon release. Re-reading them again as one long story, and having the benefit of knowing what is going to happen (roughly), I'm seeing a bunch of the foreshadowing that Gaiman was dropping all over the place that I missed on first read through with 30 days between each 22 pages.

Just read the issue in Doll's House that introduces Hob Gadling. That's still one of my favorite all time issues in all of comics - and I've read a lot of comics. It continues to hold up.
 

Scottius

Explorer
Currently reading my newly arrived copy of Monster Manual Expanded. Also reading up on Esper Genesis since I'm starting a campaign of that game.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Looks like the Netflix Sandman TV show is Preludes and Nocturnes and Dolls House. So I think I can go watch now safely. Whether I will or not is another question (says the guy who still hasn't watched any Stranger Things yet)
 



HawaiiSteveO

Blistering Barnacles!
Aside from DCC rulebook & Lankhmar boxed set, just started Salem’s Lot, never actually read it. Not a big King fan but liked some his earlier works and guess just never got around to it before now.
 

Richards

Legend
I finished White Shark and it was not a megalodon as I had imagined. But it was very well done, and I enjoyed it much better than I did Jaws (by the same author).

Next up, I started Jumper: Griffin's Story by Steven Gould. This is a weird one, because his first novel was Jumper, about a boy who realized he could teleport at will, and he did a good job figuring out how that would work and what the consequences would be. Years later (after several other novels in between), he returned to the world of Jumper and wrote a sequel called Reflex (which wasn't as good, I thought). And then Hollywood got a hold of his works and fused the two into a movie called Jumper, which apparently took ideas from both books but was was way different. And then Steven Gould decided to write a novel that was based on the movie, so this is kind of a novelization of the movie which was based on his earlier works. I never saw the movie but at only a couple chapters in I can see this is way different than the original novels. I'm not expecting much, because I read Gould's first three novels and experienced diminishing returns with each (I still think his best novel was his first; the next two subsequent ones I enjoyed a little less than the previous ones), but I'm interested in seeing just how different this setup is.

Johnathan
 

Next up, I started Jumper: Griffin's Story by Steven Gould. This is a weird one, because his first novel was Jumper, about a boy who realized he could teleport at will, and he did a good job figuring out how that would work and what the consequences would be. Years later (after several other novels in between), he returned to the world of Jumper and wrote a sequel called Reflex (which wasn't as good, I thought). And then Hollywood got a hold of his works and fused the two into a movie called Jumper, which apparently took ideas from both books but was was way different. And then Steven Gould decided to write a novel that was based on the movie, so this is kind of a novelization of the movie which was based on his earlier works. I never saw the movie but at only a couple chapters in I can see this is way different than the original novels. I'm not expecting much, because I read Gould's first three novels and experienced diminishing returns with each (I still think his best novel was his first; the next two subsequent ones I enjoyed a little less than the previous ones), but I'm interested in seeing just how different this setup is.

Johnathan
recursive adaptation
 

Nona the Ninth, next month! I cannot wait. Harrow the Ninth makes some deliberate choices that challenge the reader, but they absolutely pay off by the end.

I just finished Harrow the Ninth. It was absolutely worth it. I'm so excited for the sequels. It being written in second person was jarring, but I got used to it, and the book justified that choice.

DCC Lankhmar is a joy just to read. They do such a great job of distilling Leiber's world into a concrete text.

As for King, I likewise resisted reading his books for decades and am only now giving him a chance.

Aside from DCC rulebook & Lankhmar boxed set, just started Salem’s Lot, never actually read it. Not a big King fan but liked some his earlier works and guess just never got around to it before now.
 

I finished Weis and Hickman's Dragons of Deceit this morning. I'll leave a detailed discussion for that thread, but on the whole I enjoyed it.

Now I'm reading The Immortal of World's End, by Lin Carter. After Dragonlance, it feels all the more gonzo.
 

Finished Carter's The Immortal of World's End. It's a gonzo work of mad genius, though there's some stuff that's aged poorly in it. One thing I will say is that I never want to hear anyone say the artificer isn't old school. The Gondwane epic is specifically cited in Appendix N and sure enough, there's a character that clearly would count as an artificer in it. Making gunpowder and everything.

Now I'm reading E.D.E. Bell's Lord's Dome. She was one of the author's alley guests at this year's Origins, and I picked up this book from her there.
 

Scottius

Explorer
I have started reading The Complete Compleat Enchanter by L Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt. It's a nice hardcover with slipcover version I picked up on my latest Half Price Books trip.

And for gaming books, I just got my copy of the Lords of Chaos RPG via DriveThruRPG from a Kickstarter. Looking forward to driving into it.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
Having finished Ben Riggs' Slaying the Dragon, I'm now starting on the one book in its bibliography that I haven't read yet: Flint Dille's The Gamesmaster: Almost Famous in the Geek '80s.

...or at least, I would be, but my local library just got the copy of Weis and Hickman's Dragons of Deceit that I asked them to hold for me. So I suppose I'll need to finish that one first!
 

That a fun, charming read. Probably the best work by both of them. And perhaps the only fantasy tale with a psychologist for a main character!

I have started reading The Complete Compleat Enchanter by L Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt. It's a nice hardcover with slipcover version I picked up on my latest Half Price Books trip.

I finished Bell's Lord's Dome. Excellent stuff, with some great world building. At only 175 pages or so, it's a quick and streamlined read that makes the details matter.

Now I'm reading Barbara Hambly's The Time of the Dark. With a cover like this, how could I not?

1660759105142.png
 

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