4E is probably one of the easiest editions of D&D to have blackpowder firearms in.

Let's see:
Blackpowder pistol * Simple Ranged Weapon

cost: 50 gp
Damage: 1d8
Proficient: 0 (Special - if used with a power that targets AC that power instead targets Reflex)
Range: 10/20
Properties: Load Special (may not be reloaded in combat), counts as a crossbow for rogue powers and class features
Weight 5 lbs

Blackpowder musket * Simple Ranged Weapon
Cost: 75 gp
Damage: 1d10
Proficient: 0 (Special - if used with a power that targets AC that power instead targets Reflex)
Range: 15/30
Properties: Load Special (may not be reloaded in combat), counts as a crossbow for rogue powers and class features
Weight: 10 lbs

Blackpowder rifle * Superior Ranged Weapon
Cost: 100 gp
Damage: 1d10
Proficient: +1 (Special - if used with a power that targets AC that power instead targets Reflex)
Range: 20/40
Properties: Load Special (may not be reloaded in combat - a character may reload only one blackpowder rifle per short rest), counts as a crossbow for rogue powers and class features
Weight: 10 lbs

Blackpowder charge * Alchemical Ammo
Formula cost 20 gp
Component Cost 1 sp
Level 1
Requires the Alchemist Feat to create

No blackpowder weapon may be used in an attack or with a power that would consume more than one charge of powder when that attack or power is used with a blackpowder weapon


About as "realistic" as I feel like getting with firearms in D&D.

First: Yes, they're simple weapons - the reason firearms became popular almost immediately upon invention is that, unlike bows or even crossbows, they didn't require much training. (The rifle being an exception - I would say in the hands of an untrained user it should count as a musket). This despite firearms not improving on a trained bowman or crossbowman until rather late, historically-speaking. They're also handier and easier to transport (though that's not really an issue in D&D per se), and the ammo is much less bulky.

Lack of proficiency bonus should balance out the targeting of a NAD.

Damage deliberately modeled on that of a crossbow and longbow; ranges deliberately shortened. I want these to be options, not must-haves. Goal is to make them interesting, especially for certain types of characters. Specifically, the rogue clause allows for pirates built on Rogue class

Forked from: Non-Gunpowder Explosives in Fantasy

Quote Originally Posted by Hobo
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I think that your assumptions about what gunpowder does to the campaign are incorrect. I frequently have Pirates of the Caribbean style flintlocks in campaigns I run. I like that vibe.

1) They don't really change the campaign world that often. There are tons of rules for firearms out there, and none of them that I'm familiar with really serve to make the standard conventions of fantasy obsolete.

2) Uh... no. A good cask or barrel of gunpowder is still only as effective as a mid-level fireball spell at most. A "grenade?" You'll have to do a lot of convincing to get me to believe that it's a) cheaper, and b) more effective than something like a flask of acid or alchemists fire already. Plus, if you carry around all that gunpowder in a world where even a very low level wizard's got burning hands, scorching ray and stuff like that? That's not an advantage, that's a liability.