Homebrewed Professions for Call of Cthulhu

Celebrim

Legend
One of the things that has always bothered me about every edition of Call of Cthulhu is the fact that the profession list is always both incomplete and greatly unbalanced, with many supplemental professions simply being better than the normal professions the game originally began with. To that end I post here my list of hopefully largely complete and balanced professions for classic Call of Cthulhu RPGs. I think these were originally developed for 5e but they should be useable with just a little bit of amendment by every edition up to the current 7e. There will be little signs of my other house rules in the text. I will clarify if anyone is interested. Feedback welcome. If you can think of a concept that doesn't fit even if you squint into an existing category let me know.

Professions

Actor/Entertainer:

The two professions are considered close enough to be mechanically identical within the rules. Actor and entertainer include professions such as film and stage actors, stunt men, musicians, singers, comedians, announcers, vaudeville acts, and so forth. Many actors are classically trained in this period and expected to perform their own stunts, gallop a horse into the sunset, sing their own musical numbers, dance, and so forth. Conversely musicians may be called on to perform in other roles. While education is of a benefit, much of the profession is raw native talent and can’t be taught. Acting and entertaining are still considered somewhat shady and disreputable professions, and this may be reflected in the contacts an entertainer has.
Knowledge: The stage, night life, and the arts
Contacts: Fellow entertainers, agents, directors, producers, socialites, night club owners, bouncers and admirers.
Professional Skills: Art, Credit Rating, Disguise, Fast Talk, Persuade, Psychology, plus 2 of the following as personal specialties: Brawl, Jump, Handguns, Language, Melee Weapon, or Ride.
Special: Points from EDU are half normal, but bonus to Credit Rating, Fast Talk, Persuade and one Art skill of twice APP, and a bonus of twice DEX to your choice of Jump, Ride, or one Art skill. Bonuses are earned before allocating points,
Base Credit Rating: APP


Alienist:
You are a rare practitioner in the field that will come to be known as psychiatry and specializing in the study of mental illness and deviance. Your profession is poorly known and often poorly regarded in this period, and to learn it you have had to personally seek out the few scholars investigating this field. Your advice might be increasingly sought out by those seeking to practice police work and investigation with a scientific basis, and your consultation is increasingly welcome in asylums and sanitariums.
Knowledge: Psychology, mental illness, crime and deviance, mass psychology, hysteria and panics, mob mentality
Contacts: Practicing psychologists and mental health practitioners, asylum wardens, orderlies, and the mentally ill.
Professional Skills: Accounting, Forensics, Library Use, Medicine, Persuade, Pharmacy, Psychoanalysis, Psychology
Base Credit Rating: EDU


Antiquarian:
The investigator is a collector and sometimes seller of rare and old curios and artifacts, and may publishes scholarly works on the subject of collecting or on the historical significance of objects.
Knowledge: Rare books, numismatics, philately, antiques, bric–a–brac,
Contacts: Fellow antiquarians and hobbyists, scholars and professors of history, pawn shop owners, archaeologists and museum curators.
Professional Skills: Art, Bargain, History, Law, Library Use, Language, plus two of the following as personal specialties: Anthropology, Archaeology, Fast Talk, Occult, or Spot Hidden.
Base Credit Rating: EDU


Artist:
The investigator is an artist of some skill. While the artist may have had some degree of classical education, he is more noted for the native born talent and genius for his work.
Knowledge: His art and all that pertains to it.
Contacts: Fellow artists, collectors, admirers, and possibly high society, gallery owners, museum curators and the like depending on the artist’s credit rating.
Professional Skills: Art, Craft, Bargain, Credit Rating, History, Library Use, Persuade, Psychology.
Special: EDU bonus is half normal, but add a bonus to one Art or Craft skill, Bargain, Credit Rating, and Persuade equal to twice APP, INT, or DEX (whichever is higher) before allocating points.
Base Credit Rating: APP


Athlete/Thug:
The investigator is either a professional athlete noted for their skill in a sport, or else their physical talents have come to the attention of either the famous or infamous, who employ him as a bodyguard or heavy to enforce their wishes. Gifts of this sort cannot and sometimes need not be taught, though the skills specific to a competition often are.
Knowledge: Sports, gymnasiums
Contacts: Fellow athletes, coaches, trainers, admirers and employers
Professional Skills: Climb, Brawl, Grapple, Dodge, Jump, Ride, Swim, Throw
Special: EDU bonus is half normal, but gain a bonus to Brawl, Climb, Jump, Swim, and Throw of twice STR before allocating points.
Base Credit Rating: STR


Author/Linguist:
The investigator is a writer, in either fiction, non-fiction, or perhaps both. The investigator may earn money from the royalties of book sells, or by selling small pieces to magazines. Many writers struggle financially in veritable obscurity, while others are extremely wealthy and renowned.
Know: Almost anything depending on the subject matter that they specialize in.
Contacts: Fellow authors, book publishers, book sellers, librarians, and admirers.
Professional Skills: Art, Credit Rating, History, Library Use, Language, Persuade, Psychology, plus one of the following as a personal specialty: Anthropology, Archaeology, Forensics, Occult, or Natural History.
Base Credit Rating: INT


Aviator:
Aviation is a new profession still tinged with romanticism, even as the profession becomes more and more like an ordinary trade. Aviators are employed as mail couriers, the forestry service, cartography and surveying firms, small taxi services, test pilots, and the military. A few of the more famous still work as ‘barnstormers’ at rural fairs, awing local rubes with the still new wonders of air travel. While some are still dilettante aristocrats pursuing a hobby for the wealthy, many more were trained by the military in the Great War and have more ordinary roots.
Know: Airplanes, weather, navigation, the thrill, freedom and danger of the sky
Contacts: Other aviators, airfield owners, aircraft manufacturers, and aeronautical engineers
Professional Skills: Astronomy, Electrical Repair, Mechanical Repair, Navigate, Pilot Aircraft, Spot Hidden, plus two of the following as a personal specialty: Bargain, Crewed Weapon, Pilot Parachute
Base Credit Rating: DEX


Clergy/Missionary:
You are a member of a professional clergy, or else a pious individual who has devoted themselves to spreading their particular faith. Most have been trained in academic seminaries specifically to produce individuals of particular beliefs and character, while others have come to the profession after conversion experiences or out of sudden conviction that they should help those less fortunate. Clergy of major sects are often quite serious scholars, while missionaries are often in the fore front of anthropological exploration in remote areas with no prior contact with the outside world. Others are marked more by zeal than any practical preparation and training.
Know: Religion, comparative religion, heresies, human frailty and foibles
Contacts: Fellow clergy, laity, parishioners, celebrants, philanthropists, the miserable and lost. Very high credit rating clergy or missionaries may attract the attention of politicians and coat-tail riders.
Professional Skills: Accounting, Bargain, Language, Persuade, Psychology, plus any three of the following as personal specialties: Anthropology, Art, Credit Rating, History, Library Use, Medicine, Psychoanalysis, or Occult.
Base Credit Rating: APP


Corporate Executive:
The investigator is a leader in business and is involved in trade and manufacturing. He may be the owner of his own small business or positioned somewhere on the rung of a corporate ladder – even perhaps the chairman of the board or director of the firm. They often have some technical or legal training and are skilled salesmen and otherwise socially adept.
Know: Business, their business in particular, and everything that pertains to it.
Contacts: Other leaders in the same field, business leaders, captains of industry, suppliers, customers, and employees.
Professional Skills: Accounting, Bargain, Credit Rating, Fast Talk, Language, Psychology, plus any two of the following as a personal specialty: Craft, Chemistry, Electrical Repair, Geology, Law, Mechanical Repair, Persuade, or Pharmacy.
Base Credit Rating: INT


Criminal:
The investigator is a street-wise criminal that practices one of the varied trades that share in common a disregard for the law and often the well-being of others.
Know: Crime, the law, cons, the streets, how to get unsavory work, how to pick out a good mark
Contacts: Other criminals, cops good and bad, people who’ll look the other way
Professional Skills: Fast Talk, Listen, Psychology, Spot Hidden, plus 4 of the following as personal specialties: Art, Brawl, Climb, Drive Auto, Grapple, Bargain, Conceal, Disguise, Handgun, Hide, Locksmith, Pick Pocket, Sneak, Melee Weapon.
Base Credit Rating: INT


Detective:
The investigator is a detective, whether a member of a police force, or a private detective for hire. Bounty hunters, magistrates, and similar profession may also be included in this category. Some work in laboratories and are more like applied scientists, but most work in the streets and so must be the street-wise but respectable counterparts of criminals and other low-life if they are to successfully track or capture their quarry.
Know: Crime, the law, cons, the streets, how to get work (respectable or otherwise), how to avoid get set up or picked out
Contacts: Other detectives and investigators, police, criminals, fences, employers
Professional Skills: Brawl, Handgun, Listen, Psychology, Sneak, Spot Hidden, plus 2 of the following as personal specialties: Drive Auto, Grapple, Fast Talk, Hide, Library Use, Forensics, Photography, Law, Track.
Base Credit Rating: INT


Dilettante/Socialite:
The investigator are an heir or scion of a very wealthy family, having inherited sufficient funds to never need practical employment – or having at the least, lived as if this was the case. You pursued an education because it was expected of you, but never applied yourself seriously to any subject if doing so meant interfering with your pleasures. You have indulged your whims and hobbies primarily to avoid boredom and have something less boring to talk about during cocktail parties.
Know: Who is who
Contacts: Other wealthy, fashionable, and generally dissolute people, former college friends, film stars, literati
Professional Skills: Credit Rating, plus take any seven skills as personal specialties. However, no more than one combat skill can be taken.
Special: EDU bonus is half normal, but add a bonus to Credit Rating and Fast Talk of twice APP or INT whichever is higher, and bonus to any three other personal specialties of twice INT or DEX (whichever is higher). Bonuses are earned before allocating points.
Base Credit Rating: POW


Doctor of Medicine/Physician:
The investigator is a medical professional with a doctorate in medicine.
Know: Disease, treatments, injury, medicines, medical anomalies and curiosities
Contacts: Other doctors, hospital staff, coroners, first responders, current and former patients
Professional Skills: Library Use, Medicine, Pharmacy, First Aid, Forensics, plus three of the following as personal specialties: Accounting, Biology, Credit Rating, Persuade, or Psychology.
Base Credit Rating: EDU


Drifter:
The investigator is an itinerant of some sort. He may be aimless, or he may ply a simple trade. Some may engage in petty crime, but only to gain the essentials of survival for movement and discovery and freedom is the purpose – not the acquisition of wealth. Often he differs from a Dilettante primarily by lack of funds and social standing. Not all are completely without resources, and some may even come from a more privileged background.
Know: The hard knock life, back allies, and by-ways
Contacts: Employers of temporary labor, drifters, dreamers, layabouts, vagrants, con artists, carnies, and travelers of every sort
Professional Skills: Bargain, Conceal, Fast Talk, Hide, Listen, Psychology, Sneak, plus one of the following as a personal specialty: Art, Craft, Pick Pocket, Mechanical Repair, Natural History, Spot Hidden
Base Credit Rating: POW


Engineer:
The investigator has significant training in designing and manufacturing various practical items.
Know: How to make things, how things work, how stuff gets done
Contacts: Other engineers, scientists and researchers in related fields, manufactures and factory owners in related fields, machinists, craftsmen, tradesman and other fabricators of the sort of things the Engineer designs
Professional Skills: Chemistry, Craft, Credit Rating, Electrical Repair, Geology, Mechanical Repair, Operate Heavy Machinery, Physics.
Base Credit Rating: INT


Farmer/Forester:
The investigator is a rural farmer or forester.
Know: Agriculture, rural life, crops and prices, tractors, power tools, plants, fertilizers, pests and pesticides
Contacts: Other farmers, truckers, migrant laborers, agriculture extension agents, tractor salesmen and commodity buyers
Professional Skills: Accounting, Bargain, Craft, Electrical Repair, Mechanical Repair, Natural History, and two of the following as personal specialties: Drive, Long Guns, Operate Heavy Machinery, Pilot Boat, Ride, or Track.
Base Credit Rating: CON


Guide/Hunter:
The investigator is a professional hunter or guide, usually placed in the service of the wealthy, to provide them adventurous thrills. Big game hunters, mountaineers, and those that specialize in navigating exotic locales and cultures fall into this category.
Know: Hunting, scenic and remote areas, firearms, game, game laws, passing through customs, travel laws and permits
Contacts: Other guides and hunters, wealthy clients and patrons, local landowners, park rangers
Professional Skills: Craft, Climb, Natural History, Navigate, Listen, Long Gun, Spot Hidden, Track.
Base Credit Rating: CON


Journalist:
The investigator works for a newspaper, magazine, or radio service and is generally paid by the word or the column length and is paid to describe report or comment on current events and affairs. Most are comparatively struggling and must continually get an article sold to make ends meet. Some have some significant secondary knowledge that they employ in analysis and share in their columns. Others make stuff up and rely on the fact that the audience is generally incapable of knowing the difference.
Know: The business, the rumor mill, the scoop, the grape vine, who can spill the beans, what the public wants to hear. And occasionally, even what they write about.
Contacts: Other journalists, editors, publishers. The exact contacts depend on the subject matter the journalist commonly writes about but are generally the sorts of famous people other people want to hear about or who want to be heard. These can include politicians, entertainers, athletes, adventurers and depending on the periodical in question businessmen and scholars.
Professional Skills: Accounting, Fast Talk, Library Use, Listen, Language, Photography, Persuade, Psychology
Base Credit Rating: APP


Lawyer:
The investigator is a practitioner and student of the law, such as a prosecutor, an attorney, or even an elected official or politician. The profession is simultaneously one of high social standing and great popular derision and suspicion.
Know: The law, backroom deals, crimes, the halls of power
Contacts: Other lawyers, judges, magistrates, elected officials, clients, and people who need protection from the law or who have transgressed it
Professional Skills: Bargain, Credit Rating, Fast Talk, Law, Library Use, Language, Persuade, Psychology
Base Credit Rating: APP


Nurse:
The investigator is a medical assistant or orderly trained in hospice care of the sick or invalid. Nurses work in asylums, sanitariums, hospitals, retirement homes and in the private homes of the wealthy. The trade is considered very noble, but womanly and consequently generally commands lower salaries than similar medical professions. It however is more accessible, both to women specifically and to members of the lower social classes generally, and education of this sort is more readily obtained. They are often no nonsense sorts that are skilled in getting their way, one way or the other, from the uncooperative.
Know: Hospitals, diseases, injuries, medicines, folk remedies, gossip and rumors
Contacts: Doctors, hospital staff, patients
Professional Skills: Accounting, Grapple, First Aid, Listen, Medicine, Persuade, Pharmacy, Psychology
Base Credit Rating: CON


Noble:
The investigator is a member of the aristocracy, and received the training expected of a member of his rank, to live the life of a gentlemen or lady. Not all nobles are in fact wealthy, and many may have titles quite outsized compared the present advantages of their station and position in life. Some are quite penniless, and unable to pay the taxes and upkeep on their lands and holdings and are surviving only by slowly selling off their legacy.
Know: Heraldry, heritage, bloodlines, the peerage, pomp, circumstance and the leisurely elegant life.
Contacts: Other aristocrats, gentry, socialites, and persons of leisure. May have some contact with members of government and military officers.
Professional Skills: Art, Credit Rating, History, Law, Language, Ride, and two of the following: Accounting, Craft, Long Gun, or Melee Weapon.
Base Credit Rating: APP


Parapsychologist/Occultist:
The investigator is a researcher into phenomenon considered mystical, bizarre and occult to ordinary society. The investigator might be motivated by curiosity, skepticism, or sincere belief in such things. Thus they may either observe and study the occult, or actually practice occult arts themselves. As of yet, the observations and practices have not yielded any truly tangible results, though faith of the devotee might not in the slightest be shaken by this.
Know: Secret societies of the non-mythos variety, dubious legends, widespread myths, folk tales, rumors of haunting and paranormal activity, useless spells and rituals, astrology and other superstitions
Contacts: Practicing magicians, skeptics, students of the occult, fortune tellers, psychics, earnest believers, fakes, and con artists
Professional Skills: Art, Anthropology, History, Language, Library Use, Occult, Photography, Psychology
Base Credit Rating: POW


Professor/Scholar:
Depending on the age of the investigator, the investigator is a student (if young) or professional scholar – even likely a tenured professor.
Know: University life, sabbaticals, field work, journals, the culture and history of their academic specialties, who is who in their field
Contacts: Fellow academics, editors of journals, amateur enthusiasts, investors and inventors that might be interested in their work
Professional Skills: Credit Rating, Library Use, Language, Persuade, plus any four of the following as personal specialties: Archaeology, Anthropology, Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Natural History, History, Occult, Photography, or Physics.
Base Credit Rating: INT


Rancher/Veterinarian:
The investigator is a rancher, herdsman, or veterinarian.
Know: Livestock, rural life
Contacts: Ranchers and farmers, agriculture supply salesmen, commodity buyers
Professional Skills: Bargain, Craft, Credit Rating, Grapple, Medicine (Veterinary), Mechanical Repair, Natural History, Ride, Rope
Base Credit Rating: CON


Sailor:
The investigator is a sailor or boat captain.
Know: Currents, fish and sea life, weather at sea, maritime trade, ports of call, basics of maritime law, everything to do with ships and shipping
Contacts: Coast guard, sailors, ship owners, shipping magnets, stevedores, fishermen, and possibly smugglers
Professional Skills: Astronomy, Mechanical Repair, Natural History, Navigate, Pilot Boat, Spot Hidden, Swim, plus one of the following as a personal specialty: Accounting, Bargain, Climb, Craft, Crewed Weapon, Electrical Repair
Base Credit Rating: INT


Soldier:
The investigator is a professional solider, generally having trained and served in the military of some nation.
Know: Military bearing and discipline, weapons, warfare
Contacts: Military officers, former comrades
Professional Skills: Climb, Brawl, Melee Weapon, Handgun, Long gun, plus three of the following as personal specialties: Accounting, Crewed Weapon, Drive, First Aid, Navigate, Mechanical Repair, Pilot Boat, Sneak, Throw, or Ride.
Special: Half normal EDU bonus, but add twice DEX to as a bonus to any 5 professional skills (including personal specialties).
Base Credit Rating: CON


Tradesman:
The investigator is a professional skilled laborer who practices a craft or trade.
Know: How things work, distribution, infrastructure, trades, tradecraft, and the common life.
Contacts: Union bosses and members, employers, customers, colleagues in related trades
Professional Skills: Bargain, Craft, Drive, Electrical Repair, Mechanical Repair, Psychology, plus any two of the following as a personal specialty: Accounting, Climb, Fast Talk, Locksmith, Persuade
Special: Half normal EDU bonus, but add twice DEX or INT (whichever is higher) as a bonus to any 5 professional skills (including personal specialties).
Base Credit Rating: INT


Tribal Member:
The investigator was born and raised in a more primitive and isolated culture before entering the wider world and now is half or barely civilized in the eyes of modern society.
Know: A more primitive world
Contacts: Other tribal members of the same culture
Professional Skills: Climb, Jump, Listen, Natural History, Swim, plus 3 of the following as personal specialties: Archery, Brawl, Craft, Grapple, Heavy Melee, Melee Weapon, Occult, Spot Hidden, Throw, or Track
Base Credit Rating: STR
 
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Committed Hero

Explorer
How did you arrive at the balance you are looking for? I am not disputing it, just curious. I don't think the authors of CoC ever wanted professions to be of relatively equal worth; as I understand it, part of the design was to make a 1920s historical game, balance be damned.
 

MGibster

Legend
Given that Call of Cthulhu is set in the "real" world, it's going to be impossible for them to list every available occupation. And anyway, who are all the people clamoring to play a farmer in a Call of Cthulhu campaign? I do prefer Credit Rating to be more closely tied to occupation. A Cowboy in 7th edition had a CR between 9-20 which strikes me as correct for a common laborer.
 

Celebrim

Legend
How did you arrive at the balance you are looking for? I am not disputing it, just curious. I don't think the authors of CoC ever wanted professions to be of relatively equal worth; as I understand it, part of the design was to make a 1920s historical game, balance be damned.

So the professions above are balanced against the original core professions like Antiquarian, Professor, Detective, etc. that tend to show up in the CoC core rule book. That is they tend to offer about the same amount of access to professional skills, they tend to offer the same theoretical amount of skills points to work with, and they lack any special bonuses or powers specific to being a member of that profession. Any professional abilities not covered by skills are expressly assumed to be part of what should be straight Knowledge roles for your character. And that I think makes all the professions viable, although of course some may make more sense than others for a CoC style investigator or a particular campaign (an Aviator might be very useful in a 1920's wilderness campaign, but less so in a game that never leaves downtown Boston).

I don't think that balancing the professions as I have harms simulating 1920's history at all. Granted, you could always make a character that is an unusual member of their profession, for example a wealthy drifter but putting your hobby points into skills that seem out of place for the characters social standing and profession but I think all of that could be explained by background and I'd rather have professions sufficiently unconstrained to allow for unusual (but not impossible) backgrounds than have the system tell players exactly what they had to play because that would invariably just be a list of stereotypes.

The one area that you could quibble on the realism I think is base credit rating, which is an area that existing published CoC professions tend to modify a lot out of a desire to realistically make Doctors wealthier than Drifters (for example). And while I can see that, I think that just offering Credit Rating as a professional skill is enough to allow characters of a particular profession to on average be wealthier than characters that lack Credit Rating as a professional skill without making it impossible to be a poor down on your luck doctor or a drifter that inherited or has otherwise come into significant wealth. In practice, between the above professions and my house rules, I feel that the player characters I've had are believable 1920's characters and I'm a stickler for historical accuracy in my CoC games. In fact, I tend to really get annoyed with published works that claim to be 1920's but actually have culture and technology that is more indicative of the early 1930s (usually because their perception of the 1920's is based on Hollywood movies which tend to use 1930's era props and clothing for the 1920's because they are more impressive on screen).
 

Celebrim

Legend
Given that Call of Cthulhu is set in the "real" world, it's going to be impossible for them to list every available occupation.

I disagree. You just make the professions broad enough that it covers all the subcategories. Like I don't need a Fence or a Prostitute profession because Criminal covers the likely tropes there, and if it didn't quite fit you could probably make a Fence starting from Tradesman or Corporate Executive or a Prostitute from Drifter or Socialite depending on exactly what background and skills you imagined your character having. And note, in my house rules there are rules for having two professions if you want to 'multi-class', so it's also possible to split the difference.

And anyway, who are all the people clamoring to play a farmer in a Call of Cthulhu campaign?

This almost seems like the reverse and contradictory complaint to your first complaint. First you complain I don't cover enough professions, and now you complain I cover too many? Which is the problem you want to address. I think a farmer is perfectly valid CoC character, especially if we are like starting the game as "You are all residents of Arkham country, and whoops the Color out of Space". And whether someone is clamoring to be one isn't really the point. The point is offering the option and seeing if someone wants to and opening up creative space.

I do prefer Credit Rating to be more closely tied to occupation. A Cowboy in 7th edition had a CR between 9-20 which strikes me as correct for a common laborer.

I address this in the above post, but you're particular example is a bit odd in that Base Credit Rating for a "Cowboy" would be the Rancher profession in my game, and it would CON which is generally 3-18, a range not that far out of the 9-20 you think is reasonable. A player that invests 2-6 points into Credit Rating would have exactly the range you think is correct. But the problem here is that Rancher also covers a guy that owns 1000 head of cattle, and I don't want to create two professions that differ almost entirely by credit rating where one profession gets a huge boost in credit rating for free and is therefore strictly better. So in my game whether you are a ranch hand ("Cowboy") or the ranch owner, differs really only by how much above the baseline you want to invest in credit rating. And notice, Credit Rating is a professional skill for Rancher so it's not that costly to be a wealthy ranch owner and not merely a ranch hand if that's what you want, or if you just want to be a "Cowboy" well put those professional points into something other than Credit Rating.
 

MGibster

Legend
This almost seems like the reverse and contradictory complaint to your first complaint. First you complain I don't cover enough professions, and now you complain I cover too many? Which is the problem you want to address. I think a farmer is perfectly valid CoC character, especially if we are like starting the game as "You are all residents of Arkham country, and whoops the Color out of Space". And whether someone is clamoring to be one isn't really the point. The point is offering the option and seeing if someone wants to and opening up creative space.
I didn't actually complain that you didn't cover enough professions as I believe attempting to cover all professions is an exercise in futility. Partly because there are simply too many professions in the modern world, but also because many of them are not suitable for a game where the PCs are referred to as Investigators. It's all well and good to sit down and read a story involving a bunch of farmers dealing with some odd colour from out of space, but it's not so satisfying to sit down to play a game that revolves around investigation with a character who doesn't possess the skills to properly investigate.

I do like your idea of making the occupations broad and flexible. Why have prostitute when criminal could cover that base just as well?
 

Celebrim

Legend
I didn't actually complain that you didn't cover enough professions as I believe attempting to cover all professions is an exercise in futility.

What do you think I missed? (Posting this made me think about that, and I can think of one example that isn't covered above. I'll probably add it in the next few days when I have a chance to think.)
 

Committed Hero

Explorer
Just a few around the edges: Police Officer and Spy; maybe a Revolutionary, Explorer (still some of those in the 1920s), Salesman, or Charlatan (ie a conductor of fake occultism).
 

Celebrim

Legend
Just a few around the edges: Police Officer

Police officer is explicitly covered by Detective in it's write up. Is there some aspect of a beat cop that you couldn't build from the template in your opinion? I ask because I had a player build a 1920's New York beat cop modeled after Sean Connery's character in 'The Untouchables' using Detective as a base. I could see an argument for light melee because of baton/nightstick/club use being a personal speciality, but I'm hesitant because the job usually doesn't call for much more than baseline skill with a club and my combat skills are in house rules broader than RAW.

Which brings up a more subtle point, in that I'm aware that the current rules subtly make some sort of concepts hard. The professions are highly flexible but not perfectly flexible. One example that I'm aware of and does bother me is it's hard to play a starving actor or entertainer if you take actor/entertainer as your class. The write up is much better for a very successful actor/entertainer than what is probably more typical in the real world. You can definitely work around it by choosing something like Drifter where your "simple trade" is your art (choose Art as your personal speciality), but it requires system mastery to recognize that. And of course the problem here is that if you take Actor you'll certainly be forced to end up with a pretty good credit rating for any build that the player would want to choose actor as the profession (ei, high APP).


Probably also a Detective (or possibly even Criminal, as most spies are considered such) but I'm willing to entertain reasons why the Detective write up would be wrong for a Spy. You are however bordering on the one profession I do feel is obviously missing.

Revolutionary

Could be a Writer, could be a Soldier, depending on background. Revolutionary is rarely a profession so much as a goal you are working toward. Usually they are people from more ordinary professions who take up a cause, but if you did it long enough and it involved warfare and combat then you'd likely be a Soldier.

Explorer (still some of those in the 1920s)

Covered explicitly by Guide, or possibly depending on the background by Dilettante, Scholar or Missionary.


Covered explicitly by Tradesman or possibly by Corporate Executive depending on flavor.

or Charlatan (ie a conduct r of fake occultism)

Covered explicitly or implicitly by Occultist, or depending on whether you've actually no interest in such things and are entirely faking it by Criminal. It's pretty easy to build any sort of Con Artist from Criminal, and in fact a player has done so.
 
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