log in or register to remove this ad

 

2E Legends & Lore; University Theology

Koewn

First Post
I work at a university, and my wife's been taking classes there this summer.

She IM'd me middle of the day, and said she had a computational biologist lecturing her class. He'd just made a analogy comparing the randomness of a certain gene sequencing problem he works with to rolling dice, like d6's or d20's. He ended up having to explain a 'd20' as a die used in DND to one confused student.

This professor ended up being one of the ones I support, compute-cluster wise, and I agreed that he's both a bit nerdy and also a really good guy.

Another professor I supported walked down a bit later, and I related the story.

He mentioned to me he'd been over to this other prof's house; they have children of similar age; and he noticed a 2E Legends & Lore book on his coffee table.

He asked about it, as he'd played in the past.

Turns out that particular book was in use by his wife, who teaches Theology at another university in town.

Evidently Legends & Lore is such a succinct source of information on major real-world theologies she uses it as a reference in one of her classes.

My wife herself has had a student base a project on taxonomy and classification on the Monster Manual.

Any other RPG books you'd elect to be used as a teaching aid?
 

log in or register to remove this ad

kitsune9

First Post
I work at a university, and my wife's been taking classes there this summer.

She IM'd me middle of the day, and said she had a computational biologist lecturing her class. He'd just made a analogy comparing the randomness of a certain gene sequencing problem he works with to rolling dice, like d6's or d20's. He ended up having to explain a 'd20' as a die used in DND to one confused student.

This professor ended up being one of the ones I support, compute-cluster wise, and I agreed that he's both a bit nerdy and also a really good guy.

Another professor I supported walked down a bit later, and I related the story.

He mentioned to me he'd been over to this other prof's house; they have children of similar age; and he noticed a 2E Legends & Lore book on his coffee table.

He asked about it, as he'd played in the past.

Turns out that particular book was in use by his wife, who teaches Theology at another university in town.

Evidently Legends & Lore is such a succinct source of information on major real-world theologies she uses it as a reference in one of her classes.

My wife herself has had a student base a project on taxonomy and classification on the Monster Manual.

Any other RPG books you'd elect to be used as a teaching aid?

I'm sure a lot of parents here on the boards will discuss using 1eD&D to increase their kids vocabulary skills and playing D&D in general to increase their math skills too.

I don't think I owned the Legends and Lore book though.
 

JustKim

First Post
I've heard that one of the designers of Blue Planet is a marine biologist, and I think the setting does a pretty good job of creating an imaginary ecosystem. I even saw an alien taxonomy in one book. But for the most part, RPGs are willfully ignorant of biology and ecology.
 

pauljathome

First Post
Evidently Legends & Lore is such a succinct source of information on major real-world theologies she uses it as a reference in one of her classes.

My wife herself has had a student base a project on taxonomy and classification on the Monster Manual.

Any other RPG books you'd elect to be used as a teaching aid?

Just when you thought that the reputation of American Education
couldn't get any worse something like this comes along :).

I mean, come on. Legends and Lore as an academic resource? Either somebody is having somebody on or somebody is an ignorant buffoon. Even the barest, most superficial treatment of real world theologies would be an order of magnitude better. Or just send them to Wikipedia.

Note, this isn't at all a slam at Legends And Lores. Being a reasonable summary of real world religions is NOT its purpose.
 


Kwalish Kid

Explorer
If I ever teach another class involving gender and science, I may distribute copies of FATAL as an example of how biases in scholarship can lead to grossly mistaken conclusions.
 

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top