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5E All weapons doing d6?

jaelis

Oh this is where the title goes?
I'd make two handed weapons be 2d6 to raise the average to 7. So dual-wielding and great-weapon fighting would be the same and be differentiated by fighting styles.
I had the same thought. Still think the gap between 1H and 2H would be a bit low, assuming shields are still +2 AC. If they are +1 it would make sense.

Two-weapon style: deal Dex/Str mod damage on a miss OR (variant) gain +1 to hit while dual-wielding. Both represent the fact that attacking with more weapons increases the odds of dealing at least some damage on your turn.

Heavy weapon style: deal Str mod on a miss OR +1 to hit with heavy melee weapons (pick the one you didnt give to TWFS). In this case, it represent the fact that is way harder to totally resist a hit (even partial) from a huge-a** weapon.
There are those (and I thought well-represented among the OSR community) who quite dislike damage-on-a-miss mechanics. I don't mind it but I think full ability mod on a miss might be a bit too much.
 

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jaelis

Oh this is where the title goes?
Also just to say... for those who feel that 5e doesn't offer enough differentiation between weapons, the feat system is a great place to add that back in. That way people who like the complexity can take advantage of it, but those who don't can keep things simple.
 

vincegetorix

Jewel of the North
I had the same thought. Still think the gap between 1H and 2H would be a bit low, assuming shields are still +2 AC. If they are +1 it would make sense.


There are those (and I thought well-represented among the OSR community) who quite dislike damage-on-a-miss mechanics. I don't mind it but I think full ability mod on a miss might be a bit too much.
Then I'd go with:
TWFS: +1 to hit with melee weapon while dual-wielding.
GWFS: Reroll 1-2s on the damage roll ( or just +2 damage, if we want simpler)
 

wingsandsword

Adventurer
So would there ever be a reason why you would choose a scimitar over a long sword or a Mace over a Morning Star? should the weapon part just be part lof drawing your character profile ...
Scimitar has a better critical threat range (18-20) instead of the 19-20 critical threat range of a longsword. If you're optimizing for better critical hits, like the Improved Critical feat and the Keen enchantment, that can become a pretty clear advantage.

Morningstar does bludgeoning AND piercing damage, and is 2 lbs lighter (and 4 gp less for a basic one, which might matter at character creation). Doing piercing damage helps when facing an enemy that might have X/piercing damage reduction, the lighter weight matters if the DM is strict about encumberance, and the lower cost matters at character creation when spending your starting gold.
 

jaelis

Oh this is where the title goes?
Scimitar has a better critical threat range (18-20) instead of the 19-20 critical threat range of a longsword. If you're optimizing for better critical hits, like the Improved Critical feat and the Keen enchantment, that can become a pretty clear advantage.

Morningstar does bludgeoning AND piercing damage, and is 2 lbs lighter (and 4 gp less for a basic one, which might matter at character creation). Doing piercing damage helps when facing an enemy that might have X/piercing damage reduction, the lighter weight matters if the DM is strict about encumberance, and the lower cost matters at character creation when spending your starting gold.
Just to note, these are the 3e stats you're talking about. 3e had I think the most weapon differentiation of any dnd edition. (Unless you actually used the AD&D weapon vs armor tables.)
 
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jgsugden

Hero
I used to run a very complex combat system with weapon speeds, damage resistance versus armor type, limits on how much strength could be added to the damage by weapon type, etc... It was very detailed and added a lot of realism to the game - to a point. It was beloved by some, hated by others. In the end, I decided it was just easier to give up on the 'realism' and use the rules designed by WotC. They're there for balance reasons and work. Why fix something that is not broken?
 

Exactly!

It's 1d6 for everything.

I run 3 LBBs D&D.

I do massive dungeon crawls in the traditional way. No minis. Just verbal and imagination.

If all you look at is the damage value, you won't understand how OD&D is designed for abstraction and elegance. I did a big analysis of how OD&D works on our blog. Links to previous articles are included in the 4th blog post.

 

Dungeon World does it too and it works really well. There are tags on the weapons that differentiate them.

It’s not like the weapons in D&D lend themselves to people picking all different weapons (every rogue everywhere using rapier). Making them all the same damage would add more diversity and make narrative play more interesting.
I always find this statement funny. I play or GM in 10+ games on a rotating basis. Every party has a rogue, and not a single one of them uses a rapier. An extra 2 hp maximum and 1 hp average isn't that big of a deal. Most of the rogues use daggers, short swords or (interestingly enough) whips.

I guess everyone's experience is different.
 

Okay.

Do you have a source- I didn't see you point it out. I truly enjoy researching these sorts of things, and I've never encountered that (the iron spike story) before. I'd like to see where it came from!

1. Mike Monard (also known as "Old Geezer") was one of the OG players; he played in the original Greyhawk and the original Isle of the Ape with Ernie , Kaye, Kuntz, and Arendt.

2. It's on a different forum, but you can google the text and find the source.

PS- Anyone hear from him recently? Haven't seen him posting on any forums in a while?
I'd have to search, but IIRC it was from an old Dragon article (possibly Strategic Review). While I never played OD&D, I liked reading up on the early days. This is why I LOVE Rob's posts here!
 

SavageCole

Punk Rock Warlord
Right now, I can’t begin to have a serious conversation about which dice to use with which weapons for damage until we start treating armor as damage soak vs. hit avoidance AC.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Because having different weapons gives you a mechanically meaningful choice point for character design. If every weapon is an undifferentiated d6, then there's no real point for me in picking a weapon. It basically becomes just part of drawing your character profile, which is not for me a very interesting part of making a character. (Others may disagree.)
This. If all weapons do the same damage, there's no point in choosing a weapon. Just poke it in the eye with a finger for a d6 and be done with it. Maybe slap it and yell, "Hey Moe!"
 

I personally like to roll martial characters that have half a dozen different weapons and use the one that suits whatever situation they find themself in on any given turn (within the constraints of the weapon drawing and stowing economy), so flattening that to uniform dice seems to just remove a strategic element.

Admittedly, once magic weapons show up it starts becoming impractical to cycle in various other weapons. But up until then I see no reason for a sensible strength-based warrior to leave the house without a greatweapon, a longsword, javalins, a couple handaxes, something blunt, 3-6 daggers, and if his Dex is halfway decent, a heavy crossbow or longbow and a hand-crossbow. I have a barbarian/fighter who managed to use nearly all of them in the same encounter, though admittedly it was a very long and wide ranging encounter.
 

Andras

Explorer
Here's what I'd been thinking about. Characters do their hit die in damage with normal 1h weapons.
Light weapons do 1 die size smaller
Heavy/2h weapons do 1die size larger, with the option to substitute 2d6 for 1d12.
 

CubicsRube

Explorer
I've thought about this for a change. I once wanted a rogue with double handaxes, but as written it wouldn't work. And the amount of rogues with rapiers is too damn high! It certainly changes the approach for weapons from mechanics to fluff, and that may worm for some, and not for others.

I've run some dungeon world and one thing I particularly like about the system is a damage die per class. I like the idsa that a barbarian can be deadly with a dagger, and a wizard might wield a greatsword, but be unable to dish the pain.

You can also then add modifiers as you like - or not - for 2 handed weapons, improvised weapons and the like.

Back to the main topic, try it if you like, just discuss it with your players first. If they're om boardit might be interesting to see what combinations they come up with.
 

jmartkdr2

Explorer
Here's what I'd been thinking about. Characters do their hit die in damage with normal 1h weapons.
Light weapons do 1 die size smaller
Heavy/2h weapons do 1die size larger, with the option to substitute 2d6 for 1d12.
This only breaks down with 2h barbarians, who would do d12 with 1h weapons, so you need to figure out what to do above that (d14? 2d8?)
 


Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
Supporter
I considered making all dice explode. If it affects HP, it explodes.

It's an option I really like for falling damage.
That's a great option for falling damage. Me, I like the uncertainty of exploding pools and the rush the players get when they roll well. I think it's more satisfying than crit rolls on damage, which are always a let down when you roll like garbage on the damage dice. Now that I think of it, I may try scaling weapons to multiple smaller dice and having them all explode. That sounds fun, and deadly when it happens to the players. Maybe crits just add dice. Yup, I need to try that out. :cool:
 

Flamestrike

Adventurer
That's a great option for falling damage. Me, I like the uncertainty of exploding pools and the rush the players get when they roll well. I think it's more satisfying than crit rolls on damage, which are always a let down when you roll like garbage on the damage dice. Now that I think of it, I may try scaling weapons to multiple smaller dice and having them all explode. That sounds fun, and deadly when it happens to the players. Maybe crits just add dice. Yup, I need to try that out. :cool:
It adds a perception of unpredictability to damage. Those big effects with lots of small dice (magic missiles, fireballs, falling, acid arrow etc) feel much stronger, as do high level rogues and sneak attack.

Like I said, I like it for falling. I'm personally in the camp of [Hit points] = [Plot armour] so I narrate high level PCs surviving lethal falls as being saved by luck (HP after all represent luck in the RAW to some extent) by some lucky contrivance (a previously unseen rocky ledge, or snagging on a tree, or a cart full of hay or deep snow drift that was missed before etc). When you have PCs intentionally jumping off great heights (and metagaming falling damage) is when it starts to irk me.
 

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