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3.5 Bat’leth in 3.5 dnd?

abe ray

Registered User
Bat’leth in 3.5 dnd?

What would be the weapon stats for the bat’leth in dnd 3.5? I figured that it would be to the Klingons what the double axe would be to orcs.
I’m asking mostly for curiosities sake though if it works out I might ask for the stats for the other Star Trek weapons/equipment as well. Thanks in advance.
 

Samloyal23

Explorer
It can for sure do blunt, piercing, and slashing damage. The design has a blunt back and blades with sharp points, so any type of damage. The shape of the front crescent makes catching or blocking weapons easy. Damage? I am not sure, maybe 1d8?
 

abe ray

Registered User
It can for sure do blunt, piercing, and slashing damage. The design has a blunt back and blades with sharp points, so any type of damage. The shape of the front crescent makes catching or blocking weapons easy. Damage? I am not sure, maybe 1d8?
But would it be a racial weapon for Klingons though? As for damage, I was thinking 2d6 myself.
 

Peregry

Villager
Err... the best stating for a Bat'leth should probably reflect how it's used. As such, given it is typically treated as something akin to a staff in how its wielded, I'd actually say it's a double-weapon, likely doing 1d6/1d6 piercing and slashing damage. Yes, that's lower than the others, but it's also fairly short which prohibits much power being behind the blows due to lack of leverage.

However, when you look at the weapon, it's clearly meant to capture and disarm. It's actually a highly defensive weapon, not an offensive one. As such, I'd grant it a bonus on disarm attempts as well as perhaps even granting a shield bonus to AC in the +1 to +2 range.

Critical range should be small, it s hard to get a deep penetrating blow with the weapon as designed, it interferes with itself. However, when it DOES find that chink, it's going to be nasty, so give it a x3 critical.

So, long story short:

Batl'eth - Exotic Weapon
1d6/1d6 20x3, Wielder gets a +2 bonus on disarm attempts and a +2 shield bonus while wielding.

The other famous Klingon weapon, the shorter Mek'leth, is pretty much covered by the Scimitar, Short Sword, or Butterfly Sword. It's not really unique enough to earn its own stat block.
 

Greenfield

Adventurer
Hmmm...

Essentially a Bladestaff or double-axe. Exotic. Clearly intended to be used two handed, though TNG showed some one handed use in practice.

There were some scenes with Michael Dorn (Warf) doing katas where it was almost like a dance.

Mechanically it isn't that different in use from a great axe. Similar length and weight, similar grip. Maybe drop the damage to a D8. (When using an axe to cut wood, which I've done, it's common to start with the left hand at the base and the right one near the head, then slide the right hand down as you complete the swing. No way to slide that hand on the Bat'leth.) Same crit range would work.

So Exotic, like the Bastard Sword: Can be used two handed by anyone with battle axe proficiency, need Exotic weapon feat to use one handed.

Someone mentioned its use in parrying: I wouldn't give it the automatic AC bonus, but perhaps a +1 AC when used with Combat Expertise. (For those unfamiliar with this seldom used feat, it lets you shift from one to five BAB points to AC, sort of the counterpart to Power Attack.)

And yes, I'd give it a +1 to Disarm attempts.

Anything more would make it overpowered. Fewer advantages/options than the Spiked Chain, and comparable damage.
 

abe ray

Registered User
Bat’leth in 3.5 dnd?

Along these lines, how would dnd humanoids use a tricorder anyway? I think that’s how you spell the word anyway.
 
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LuisCarlos17f

Registered User
A melee weapon not only has to be hard, but also enough light for a faster fight. Try fight with toy weapons by plastic and you will notice the bat'leth is horrible
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
A melee weapon not only has to be hard, but also enough light for a faster fight. Try fight with toy weapons by plastic and you will notice the bat'leth is horrible
1d6/1d6 P/S damage.

-4 attack roll
-2 AC

Reason: Probably the dumbest fantasy weapon ever imagined.
Look if we are going to examine 3.5 Weapons based on effectiveness, I have a lot more to complain about than the bat'leth (which is admittedly a terrible weapon, though the mek'leth is not so bad) but that's not what the OP asked.
 

Samloyal23

Explorer
People keep downing the batl'eth, but it is a really versatile weapon. It can slash, pierce, and bludgeon. It is good for trip attacks and parrying. It can be used one-handed or two-handed. I do not see a downside for a trained user.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
People keep downing the batl'eth, but it is a really versatile weapon. It can slash, pierce, and bludgeon. It is good for trip attacks and parrying. It can be used one-handed or two-handed. I do not see a downside for a trained user.
Why yes it can. In the hands of an actor who knows his contract is for two years. It looks silly. But it must be super uber because Wolf um Worg, the knobbing headed guy who couldn't handle his mall cop job on the Enterprise has one.
I seen a lot of silly weapons from tv and movies turn billy bad Beep because they looked cool and the fans wanted them to be the bestest weapon in the game.
 

Greenfield

Adventurer
Saw a replica in a fantasy/game shop and had a chance to handle it.

The hand grips were a bit thin on that particular one, so it could easily twist in your grip and not always hit edge first.

Fix that, though, and yeah, it's entirely practical. It's essentially an axe though, as in, it's a chopping weapon with a two handed grip, with the hands spaced at about shoulder width.

I compare it to an axe because, even though it's called a "Klingon sword", you can't actually slice an opponent with it. And, while it's got a lot of pointy places, the actual points have so little depth to them they'd have less penetration than a good dagger.

So it's decent for a great-weapon fighter, and includes the options for some combat maneuvers (Trip is feasible, Disarm not so much, off-handed attack possible), but in the end I'd call it an Exotic Great Axe and leave it at that.
 

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