• NOW LIVE! -- One-Page Adventures for D&D 5th Edition on Kickstarter! A booklet of colourful one-page adventures for D&D 5th Edition ranging from levels 1-9 and designed for a single session of play.
log in or register to remove this ad

 

Getting Ready to Play

Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
If there is one moment I really like about roleplaying games it is the final preparation before a session. Reviewing everything one last time, adding extra notes and possible plot twists. Defining NPCs a bit more. I rely on index cards and color markers to do that. I find them are easy to consult during the game.

How do you prepare?

MoMY274.jpg
 

log in or register to remove this ad

billd91

Hobbit on Quest
I usually build a Word document out of stat blocks of opponents in the game that I can then annotate, write on to track hit points, spells cast, etc. This gives me a chance to review all of the stat blocks actively and interact with them rather than just reading them on the page which helps cement their presence in the adventure into my brain.
 


el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
I like to put on mood setting music as I prep - usually a movie score or a Beethoven symphony. If possible, I draw battle maps ahead of time, I adjust the cameras for my remote set-up, I choose the specific dice I want to use that day, and do final print out of any hand outs for players (these days links to the wiki, until we can be F2F again). I also handwrite a bunch of notes but then type them up more clearly + stat blocks. I have attached a PDF example.
 

Attachments

  • G.O.S Session #5 - Lay of the Land.pdf
    1.2 MB · Views: 18

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
At my tavern face to face game, it was to have a beer and review notes of went on last game. I feel that a certain amount of the art of winging it is what a good GM does. I do have a pdf of my setting available if players want that. Play by post is super easy, no prep, or forever prep, depending on how one wants to look at it. I find world building relaxing, I do it for my own benefit, and don't expect the players to do anything other than to interact with the environment at the moment.
 


MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
My game prep used to look like your photo back in the days of in-person gaming. Now it is having multiple screens set up with my VTT, several tabs of D&D Beyond, PDF of the adventure (with prep and session notes added as comments and bookmarks ), and my Google Spreadsheet that I use to track in-game time.
 


TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
I tend to do a ton of worldbuilding, notetaking and planning in the weeks before. I'm always several session ahead when it comes to that.

Then, before a session, I'll go over my worldbuilding and notes and pick ideas and elements that still ring with me and develop them a bit or condense them a bit. I'll prepare two or three possible encounters with what direction the session could take. I prepare any interesting rewards. I write key words for descriptions of what they'll see. And I condense all of this in one page in my note-taking app.
 

My pre-game prep consists of the following:
  • Print off the adventure, after having done a final proofreading check the night before
  • Print off my PC Tracking Sheet, with AC values, hp, spell slots, ability scores, and any class abilities usable a certain number of times/day
  • Print off my Monster Stats sheet, with AC, hp, attack and damage, saves, special abilities, etc. for each monster in the adventure
  • Print off any player handouts
  • Gather up an initiative card for each PC/NPC/monster in the adventure
  • Gather up the appropriate minis/tokens
  • Gather up the maps I'll be using (often homemade on the back of a desk calendar sheet gridded off into 1" squares)
  • Set out the snacks we bought the night before on our downstairs kitchen island
  • Lay out my dice at the DM end of the table
  • Place any updated sheets for the PC binders from our last adventure (new equipment lists, class abilities, spell lists, etc.) at the players' places at the table
  • Place any minis the players will be using (my own family members' PC minis, the horses/donkeys/wagon the whole group uses, familiars/animal companions. etc.)
Johnathan
 

I usually build a Word document out of stat blocks of opponents in the game that I can then annotate, write on to track hit points, spells cast, etc. This gives me a chance to review all of the stat blocks actively and interact with them rather than just reading them on the page which helps cement their presence in the adventure into my brain.
I use a different program — Libre Office — but often do likewise.
I'm running a game with lots of random encounters... so the stats are transcribed into a digest sized 40pp booklet of NPC templates.

If I have to make maps, I usually use Alphalina Designer. Why? Pay once license, vector graphics, good pen support and designed for tablet mode.
 

shawnhcorey

Explorer
I use a different program — Libre Office — but often do likewise.
I'm running a game with lots of random encounters... so the stats are transcribed into a digest sized 40pp booklet of NPC templates.

If I have to make maps, I usually use Alphalina Designer. Why? Pay once license, vector graphics, good pen support and designed for tablet mode.

The FOSS alternative is Inkscape.

Some free graphics software. (They all have layers, except Blender.)
Raster-based:
Vector: Draw Freely | Inkscape
3D: blender.org - Home of the Blender project - Free and Open 3D Creation Software

Free software for organizing your notes: Zim - a desktop wiki
 

aco175

Legend
I make all my adventures with some notes and all the statblocks in the adventure, similar to 4e Dungeon Delve book. I try to anticipate the players and have a few notes of what I think they may do. This may work more of the time, but enough that it helps. I tend to sent it to work to print since it is faster and easier on that printer. I have forgot to put the adventure back in my car as soon as printed and have forgot it at work a time or two.

I could show up to a game with one binder that has the adventure I printed out and several reference sheets with notes and NPCs and such. I also have a dice box with some pencils and minis inside that I would need and a few grid maps. My brother brings a few totes of minis and the dungeon tiles, so that frees me some.
 


An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top