Review Giantlands, reviewed by David Flor on Twitter.

darjr

I crit!
They go into the review not expecting great things but I think, like he does, this is worth noting.

It's worth noting that the foreword - which was written by James Ward - is much better written than the rest of the game, which makes me wonder how much of the actual game text was written by Ward.


 

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bennet

Explorer
Wow, Ernie created a game that is gender fluid, who knew he was so up in the times, a true modern role model.

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Arilyn

Hero
This feels a lot like a game created in the late 70s/early 80s that popped up and withered quickly. The whole thing is rather sad.
 













Sir Brennen

Legend
View attachment 149415

"There is no fun in playing a maimed or crippled character", ah, that's the Dineheart we know and "love" from TSR3's old twitter account.
Able-ist implications aside, it's interesting how much of the game text shown in the Twitter thread seems to have this "other games do this, but we don't, because the other way sucks" tone. If they eliminated the attitude, I wonder what the page count would have been.
 
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Jer

Legend
Supporter
Wow - that sounds so much worse than it should be.

Not even the worst bit but one that jumped out immediately - I thought people figured out that randomly rolling attributes on a span of 0-100 with uniform probability was a bad idea decades ago. Even some of the first percentile driven games (like say Star Frontiers) understood you shouldn't do that. To see it in a modern game not written by a 12 year old figuring things out on first principles is shocking. To see it on a game with Jim Ward's name on it and being sold for $130 a pop is utterly baffling.
 


billd91

Hobbit on Quest (he/him)
Not even the worst bit but one that jumped out immediately - I thought people figured out that randomly rolling attributes on a span of 0-100 with uniform probability was a bad idea decades ago. Even some of the first percentile driven games (like say Star Frontiers) understood you shouldn't do that. To see it in a modern game not written by a 12 year old figuring things out on first principles is shocking. To see it on a game with Jim Ward's name on it and being sold for $130 a pop is utterly baffling.
Yeah, there are ways to handle a 0-100 span for stats that are terrible and others that aren't. I don't have too much experience with systems that also used a flat d100 span, but I did play a little Recon back in the day which had the unvarnished d100 for its stats. And while some of the atmospherics of the setting and approach were interesting, I wasn't impressed with the game play. I rolled a 98 for my Alertness in character generation, so my Medic was better at point than the character who took the Point MOS was.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
Wow - that sounds so much worse than it should be.

Not even the worst bit but one that jumped out immediately - I thought people figured out that randomly rolling attributes on a span of 0-100 with uniform probability was a bad idea decades ago. Even some of the first percentile driven games (like say Star Frontiers) understood you shouldn't do that. To see it in a modern game not written by a 12 year old figuring things out on first principles is shocking. To see it on a game with Jim Ward's name on it and being sold for $130 a pop is utterly baffling.
I used a 1-100 scale when I created Altus Adventum...many years ago. While I think I gave options to prevent the wild swings in scores, I don't think I'd ever use a 1-100 range again.

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