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Is this the year that theaters die?

Zardnaar

Legend
Sad here even an go to theatre but not much to see. One movie had 6 WW84 got about40% capacity.

I was a smallish 6 screen affair but they do like meals you can order with fold out "tables" have a beer.

The others in an old stage place. Decors early 20th century almost like an old opera house. Has the old school acoustic s.

Christmas Gift From Bob best movie of 2020!!!
 

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aco175

Legend
There is a Cinemagic chain around me that announced closing entirely. Not sure how nation-wide they are.

Next question will be what prices the tickets will be once we can go back.
 

MarkB

Legend
There is a Cinemagic chain around me that announced closing entirely. Not sure how nation-wide they are.

Next question will be what prices the tickets will be once we can go back.
I wonder whether we'll go back to fully packed theaters, or if some will be redesigned with social distancing in mind. Will we see any actual change in mindset when it comes to casual close proximity?
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I think some current cinema chains might struggle or die, but (if!) things go back to normal, others (or new ones) will take their place.

National cinema chains like Cineworld, Odeon, and Vue have been struggling for ages (the Cineworld cinema in Southampton closed a few years ago, and the Odeon was struggling long before the pandemic).

One thing that might weather it well is the luxury chains like Showcase - the ones with the reclining seats, and space, and stuff. Other cinemas might need to pivot to provide that experience, contrasted to what you can get at home.
 

GreyLord

Hero
It may be that the Avatar movies will save the theater and remind people why they liked to go to Theaters once upon a time...

That is, saying that life resumes to something resembling what it used to be after the vaccines are all distributed.
 

embee

Lawyer by day. Rules lawyer by night.
thing that might weather it well is the luxury chains like Showcase - the ones with the reclining seats, and space, and stuff. Other cinemas might need to pivot to provide that experience, contrasted to what you can get at home.
That's a problem, not a solution.

You don't just pivot to that. You shut down your theatre for 6 months to do the renovations and upgrade. While doing that, you incur additional costs of renovations, while taking in less or no revenue. You need to upgrade food preparation systems to make the expanded menu offerings and have R&D costs in developing those menu items.

And, when you're done, you now have more debt and have to justify the higher ticket prices that you need to pay for the renovation to a public that already complains about movie ticket prices.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
That's a problem, not a solution.

You don't just pivot to that. You shut down your theatre for 6 months to do the renovations and upgrade. While doing that, you incur additional costs of renovations, while taking in less or no revenue. You need to upgrade food preparation systems to make the expanded menu offerings and have R&D costs in developing those menu items.

And, when you're done, you now have more debt and have to justify the higher ticket prices that you need to pay for the renovation to a public that already complains about movie ticket prices.
Yep. It’s not going to be easy on anybody and some will go under.
 

CapnZapp

Legend

So, is the future dimming on the theater experience or is this year just an off year and come 2022,they will bounce back?
Since the ages-old rule that prohibited studios from buying cinema chains was removed during the last administration, I'm not worried.

There will be theatres, though possibly fewer of them And it won't be AMC or Cinemark theatres, it will be Disney and Netflix theatres.
 

Retreater

Legend
That's a problem, not a solution.

You don't just pivot to that. You shut down your theatre for 6 months to do the renovations and upgrade. While doing that, you incur additional costs of renovations, while taking in less or no revenue. You need to upgrade food preparation systems to make the expanded menu offerings and have R&D costs in developing those menu items.

And, when you're done, you now have more debt and have to justify the higher ticket prices that you need to pay for the renovation to a public that already complains about movie ticket prices.
Wonder if there's going to be government stimulus funds available for taking steps to remodel arts venues for continued social distancing? Not just cinemas but also live theatres, museums, planetariums, etc.?
My library got some initial aid to do this as well as a grant from the state Humanities Council to help offer storytimes and author visits in safer ways.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Will we see any actual change in mindset when it comes to casual close proximity?

I mean, we have half a million dead in the US largely because folks absolutely refuse to change their mindsets, so... no, you won't see a change long term I think.

And, there's a strong argument that you shouldn't reorganize all of normal life for lower capacities and greater distances. Such measures are not needed 99% of the time, so constant preparation in this way is extremely costly for no gain, and questionable effectiveness.

I say questionable effectiveness, because our most recent surges, the worst case loads seen in the year, weren't driven by large entertainment venues. They were driven by people visiting family and friends for holidays.
 
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ccs

41st lv DM
I mean, we have half a million dead in the US largely because folks absolutely refuse to change their mindsets, so... no, you won't see a change long term I think.

And, there's a strong argument that you shouldn't reorganize all of normal life for lower capacities and greater distances. Such measures are not needed 99% of the time, so constant preparation in this way is extremely costly for no gain, and questionable effectiveness.

I say questionable effectiveness, because our most recent surges, the worst case loads seen in the year, weren't driven by large entertainment venues. They driven by people visiting family and friends for holidays.
And that is NEVER going to change. People will not largely abandon seeing their families. Especially in times of crisis. Even if doing so is the logical course of action.
 

Wishbone

Paladin Radmaster
Since the ages-old rule that prohibited studios from buying cinema chains was removed during the last administration, I'm not worried.

There will be theatres, though possibly fewer of them And it won't be AMC or Cinemark theatres, it will be Disney and Netflix theatres.
Well, it removed the eight defendants named at the time from purchasing chains—Amazon Studios, Walt Disney Studios, and Netflix were arguably never subject to the ruling. Though you're right journalists have talked about the possibility of theater chains being snapped up by Amazon or Netflix.
 

Blue Orange

Explorer
While it's generally true that people aren't likely to go long-distance for everything after the pandemic is defeated, I do think you will see a shift towards more long-distance work and the like, which is likely to have knock-on effects (I wouldn't like to be a Manhattan real-estate company about now), many of which we can't predict. Not everyone is going to avoid being crowded, but I wouldn't be too surprised if, say, high-density events like concerts never bounce back completely. After all, you never know when the next plague is coming.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
And that is NEVER going to change. People will not largely abandon seeing their families. Especially in times of crisis. Even if doing so is the logical course of action.
Some will. I know plenty of people, including myself, who haven’t seen their families or friends or been to a shop or event for a full year now. There are always some, and we’re not talking tiny outliers.
 

Blue Orange

Explorer
Some will. I know plenty of people, including myself, who haven’t seen their families or friends or been to a shop or event for a full year now. There are always some, and we’re not talking tiny outliers.
Don't know if I want to 'like' that, but thank you for being responsible and helping to control this deadly virus.
 

Ryujin

Hero
While it's generally true that people aren't likely to go long-distance for everything after the pandemic is defeated, I do think you will see a shift towards more long-distance work and the like, which is likely to have knock-on effects (I wouldn't like to be a Manhattan real-estate company about now), many of which we can't predict. Not everyone is going to avoid being crowded, but I wouldn't be too surprised if, say, high-density events like concerts never bounce back completely. After all, you never know when the next plague is coming.
I fully expect that offices in downtown Toronto will continue at relatively low occupancy well after everything is largely sorted. Even I, who do hands-on technical work, will be doing at least one day a week as work-from-home. Right now I'm going in for one day a week, every two weeks, with one other co-worker in my group. We alternate each week who goes in to give on-site availability, twice a week, on Mondays and Wednesdays.

On the upside, we may be able to acquire more buildings, closer to campus, and divest ourselves of some of the outlying ridiculously far buildings in which we rent space, and consolidate better with the partial exodus from downtown. Maybe it will also result in a reduction in the preposterous cost of housing in Toronto, as so many people have learnt they can work from half a Province away without any real issues.
 

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