• COMING SOON! -- Level Up: Advanced 5th Edition! Level up your 5E game! The standalone advanced 5E tabletop RPG adds depth and diversity to the game you love!
log in or register to remove this ad

 

TSR [Let's Read] Polyhedron/Dungeon

What, you really thought I wouldn't include one of these? As if!


  • Total voters
    43

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 69: March 1992



part 3/5



The Living City: This month's entry will not please the person complaining about too many high level characters in Raven's Bluff, as it's another high level thief who decided they were getting too old for the adventuring life and used their ill-gotten gains to go legit. Shylock Revahl is now the proprietor of Ye Olde Bluff Jeweler, a high-class place in an upscale neighbourhood. He gets up early every morning, takes his work seriously, and is a responsible dad to his adopted daughter. Only the little details in the way he dresses and observes a room hint to a similarly skilled person that he knows all the tricks thieves use to rob people & places and would not be an easy mark. His daughter wants to follow in his footsteps, which he seems rather ambivalent about. It might be dangerous, but what can you do with teenagers? If you forbid it too hard they'll just rebel and do it anyway because you think you're invincible when you're young. This is pretty middle of the road in terms of both writing quality and degree of adventure hooks for this column, with a bit of diminishing returns because they're familiar ones. Just how many old guys who's past catches up with them and forces them to take one more job or kids who want to be adventurers does any particular campaign need? The more similar ones like this they add, the less likely each individual one will actually get used.



The New Rogues Gallery: This column is very weird indeed this time. Willac Tatthryd was originally a male human priest, but was killed and due to random roll on the reincarnation table, wound up as a female ogre. (Is that even rules legal?! :looks up: Both 1e and 2e corebook versions say nothing about the sex of the new body, so I guess it's entirely up to the DM whether it's always the same as the previous life or 50/50 either way.) This could easily have turned into just a string of transphobic jokes, which i wouldn't have been surprised to see given the level of many adventures published in here. But amazingly enough, it does actually treat the topic with some sensitivity, and while she still faces some prejudice, she's adapted to her new life pretty decently, and even got a conjurer husband, who is her biggest defender against both any external threats and her own remaining insecurities. It's still somewhat dubious when it comes to issues of consent, treating randomly stumbling across a love potion and accidentally drinking it as a joke, but since they're both spellcasters who also usually have mind control spells memorised, you can't say they're completely innocent and undeserving parties here. So while this still isn't exactly great by modern standards, it is pretty interesting, and a good reminder why roleplaying attracts trans people in disproportionate amounts. Being able to safely explore lots of very different identities is helpful when you're still uncertain or in the closet about your own real life identity. Of course the process is going to be somewhat clumsy and might make you cringe when you look back decades later. I can't judge this one too harshly.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 69: March 1992



part 4/5



Into The Dark: James decides to go for the theme of a very specific monster this issue. Zombies! They're actually a fairly recent addition to the folkloric roster, less than a century old, but have become very popular both in their own right, and also as mooks for other varieties of undead & spellcasters. There's plenty of both good and bad movies featuring them to choose from.

White Zombie was the very first zombie movie, made back in 1932. Like many old, low-budget movies, it somehow manages to be both too short and too slow paced for people used to the modern style of writing & editing, but still has some genuinely creepy moments that hold up today, particularly where the people are actually being turned into zombies for the first time. It's important to know your history.

Day of the Dead is the third in George Romero's long-running series where the zombies are very obviously metaphors for humanities own cruelty to one another, and the biggest danger is the stupidity and greed of the other people you're sheltering with. Sometimes the monologuing can be a bit heavy-handed, but they're still classics for a reason. Most modern day zombie films show definite influence from him.

Gates of Hell lacks the cleverness of the previous two, and so ups the amount of gore to overcompensate. Lots of largely interchangable characters who's only purpose is to die in various ways, and bad editing is not the way to get people invested enough to care when the bad stuff happens, and that's kinda important for true horror to work.

Horror of the Zombies is also cheap and stupidly written, but this time in spanish. The zombies are so slow and weak that no reasonable person would ever be caught by them, leaving things distinctly unscary. Not really worth all the hassle of subtitles or even worse dubbing to get through.

Return of the Living Dead gets the highest marks here, as it takes the zombie movie cliches, subverts them, and adds plenty of dark humour. Just don't bother with the sequel, as it's a waste of time by comparison.



Gamma World Game Loot: The attempt to give Gamma World 4e a decent amount of promotion continues with a look at their treasure tables. In keeping with the current attempts to make it work more like D&D, they have exactly the same kind of treasure types, with A-O for lairs, and U-Z for stuff carried by individuals. The treasure itself isn't hugely changed though, a motley mix of everyday things from the modern era that might seem wondrous to them, and things that are genuinely fantastical like laser guns and holocubes. (and a few things that were sci-fi in the 80's, but now seem mundane like an electronic map of the world on a tablet. ) So this continues their attempts to get the many readers who only play D&D to diversify by making switching seem as familiar and pain-free as possible. It all feels pretty cynical, and of course is of no use once you actually buy the books. I'm not particularly thrilled by this.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 69: March 1992



part 5/5



Bestiary: Air Fish are pretty similar to regular fish, except they swim through air instead of water with the aid of innate levitation powers. Most of them are low HD and slow moving, as fins are not as effective a method of propulsion in the much thinner air, but air sharks are both swift and capable of taking a nasty clunk out of you, while air mantas have a nasty paralytic stinger. They'll be a good indicator that you're in a high magic zone where the ecology gets weird, but unlikely to be the main challenge.

The Valiant Thirteenth are not a monster, but get an entry formatted like one as a joke. They're actually one of the RPGA's longer-running official clubs, meeting approximately every other week in Boston (with a lot of turnover) since 1978. So we get three pages of info on their history, how they operate, and the games they're currently running, along with lots of in jokes and some caricatured portraits of their core members. There's plenty of interesting facts amongst the humour and endless bickering, and while getting everyone to show up on time and get down to playing seems a sisyphean task, they must be doing something right to have kept going this long. A reasonably entertaining diversion, that could probably be repeated a few more times with different clubs before hitting diminishing returns.



Official Network Clubs are now up to 75 worldwide, and they spend 3 pages doing an A-Z of them. An upward trend, but still much slower than they'd like. Will they ever reach the point where they can no longer fit the list into a single issue, but have to publish them separately, or just list it all online?



The Living Galaxy: it's good to see my opinions being backed up. Roger has found that his series of columns on sentient spaceships has got easily the most praise and general responses of these columns. Being highly specific rather than generic is much more interesting, and gives other people more opportunities to put their own ideas and opinions in. TSR's other staff members have plenty of ideas of their own, plus a ton of references from old stories, several of them published by sister magazine Amazing Stories. Several of the ideas revolve around how a large mechanical intelligence can escape death by having smaller mobile bodies to use as an escape pod, or leaving backups of it's memories in port. Since this topic seems to be popular, he starts a competition to see who can come up with the weirdest (while still being playable) nonstandard PC type. When you're running out of ideas on your own, stop, collaborate and listen to get some new ones to try. It's both easier and more fun than trying to come up with enough to fill a column every month, running out of inspiration and resorting to padding to make up the word count.



Bloodmoose & Company returns quietly after an extended absence. And now they have a time machine! Where and when will it take them?



A pretty interesting issue, with both above average articles and signs of historical progression. As I was finding many recent issues a bit dull, that comes as welcome. Whether those changes will be good for them long term or not, it still keeps every day from merging into one grey expanse of unbroken time. Time to open another door and see see if there's monsters or treasure within.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Dungeon Issue 34: Mar/Apr 1992



part 1/5



80 pages. A cover where all the participants are looking away from the camera? You don't see that very often, even when it would make sense narratively. They'll more often go to great lengths to have both sides showing both face and ass, particularly when the participants are female. So this little bit of drama comes as welcome, even if it might not end well for the person about to be backstabbed long-term. Let's see if the adventures inside have anything similarly unexpected to offer.



Editorial: There is no truely generic fantasy, merely unexamined conventions that are taken as default. The more Barbara asks people what they want from the magazine, the more obvious it becomes that different people have very different preferences, so you need to publish a wide variety of things if you want to keep them interested. Popular settings, not so popular settings, dungeons that can easily be placed anywhere, and solo missions all have their part to play, so send them all in. Just don't forget your SASE! This all seems pretty much business as usual. Getting all your readers to agree is both a futile task and would be boring if they did. Just keep on publishing the most interesting adventures you get, especially if they don't fit the mould of the average one and you've got a good chance of going on for many years more.



Letters: The debate on the proportion of generic to setting specific adventures also dominates the letters page. First letter is by frequent contributor Randy Maxwell, answering why he designs adventures the way he does, and some other frequent complaints in here. Most of it's all very logical, or at least following the path or least resistance, even if the steps they took to get there might not make sense in hindsight.

Second wants one adventure per issue to be for a specific setting, one for one of their three vanilla settings, and the rest completely generic. Barbara agrees with the general figures, but of course individual issues may still vary, as sizes of adventure also do, and sometimes they'll vary the number to put something particularly epic in.

Future Al Qadim writer Steve Kurtz is unsurprisingly another one in favour of lots of diversity. You never know what you'll need for a campaign, so it's helpful to have a wide toolkit to choose from.

4th things generic sounds boring and pejorative. Call them versatile adventures instead. Urgh. Can we not do the euphemism treadmill thing here. It wastes time and helps no-one.

5th is another one in favor of more specific setting material. Ah, but which one? That's the real tricky decision.

6th prefers adventures entirely created by their writers to ones set in TSR worlds, but accepts that both kinds are useful to figure out how best to create your own.

7th also thinks the mix of generic and specific adventures is about right. As long as they're packed with interesting details to make them feel solid, precisely what those details are can be varied quite a lot and the adventures will remain usable.

8th takes a break from the debate to thank Steve Kurtz for his recent adventure. It's twists and turns were suitably challenging for his PC's when he ran it.

9th also lists the adventures from the magazine that have seen actual play in their campaign. Some of them took a bit of geographical adaption, but plenty of fun was had. May they produce plenty more, particularly a few more high level ones to choose from.

10th is also a particular fan of Steve Kurtz. His future hiring comes as no surprise if his first submission got that many good responses.

11th has been enjoying both the modules from Dungeon, and the ones published in Dragon before it started, and would like to see a best of. Hindsight says that's not happening, but it's good to have a dream.

12th also wants lots of adventures for specific settings. TSR has been publishing so many of them recently, and if they don't have decent rosters of adventures for each of them they'll go to waste. This is why you don't want to have too many active at once. You can't give proper attention to all of them, and their fanbases will suffer accordingly.

13th wants more Ravenloft and Forgotten Realms adventures in particular. Both have tons of cool places only hinted about in the corebooks to expand upon.

14th is particularly interested in Spelljammer and Ravenloft, as they depart more from regular adventures than the Realms or Greyhawk, where you can use generic adventures and ones for them pretty interchangeably. Since spelljammer in particular only has two intro adventures so far, it could really do with the expansion.

15th and final also finds FR & GH adventures no harder to use than completely generic ones. Don't be put off by branding, look at each one regardless of setting and see if you can make it work for your campaign.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Dungeon Issue 34: Mar/Apr 1992



part 2/5



Euphoria Horrors: Well, that's an interesting title. What's going on here then? :reads, sighs heavily: Well, I guess it had to happen sometime. Dungeon decides to do a Very Special Episode, where they show us in a fairly heavyhanded fashion that doing drugs is bad, mmkay, and will ruin your life, so don't do drugs. The PC's get approached by a distraught little boy crying that his friend has disappeared. Further questioning will at least reveal that his friend is not human and looks a bit like a big butterfly, but not precisely what his friend is, as the kid lacks the vocabulary to be more precise. When his parents see him talking to adventurers, they'll get aggressively protective (don't talk to strangers, kids!) and drive them away, leaving you with a quest and insufficient information to complete it easily. Fortunately, a bit of sniffing around will reveal suspicious tracks that will lead you to the culprits. Turns out the "friend" is a faerie dragon which has been trapped and caged by Tasloi, who have become addicted to his euphoria breath weapon and now force him to breathe on them, so they spend most of their time off their heads apart from brief, increasingly sloppy forays for more food. So this is a pretty short and easy adventure that's made even easier by the fact that most of the monsters are either high or jonesing most of the time, and so are acting in silly ways and suffering mechanical penalties to their actions. It has the combination of linearity, whimsy, and overt moralising that's more commonly found in Polyhedron adventures than Dungeon ones, which is decidedly unwelcome to see. I'm not completely averse to aesops & allegory in my adventures, but they'd need to be a bit more subtle and sophisticated than this after school special crap for me to consider using them.



Side Treks - Rogue: The short scenario this time is an entirely mundane adventure idea that has happened in reality. An elephant was attacked by hunters, injured but survived, and now he has a quite understandable grudge against the whole of humanity. So he's attacking any humans he finds in the jungle with increasing aggression and has already killed several low level parties. This is obviously a problem for both natives and traders, so a hefty reward is posted. (plus what you'll get from selling his ivory on top.) One of those reminders that in a world where there are plenty of bigger, smarter monsters out there, and humanity is stuck at medievalish population densities & tech levels due to their depredations, no-one has the safety or perspective to develop anything resembling modern standards of conservation except maybe the druids. So while it is theoretically possible to talk the elephant down and resolve this peacefully if you have the right spells, that won't stop the locals from wanting vengeance for all the previous deaths, and you'll have to take him with you if you want him to survive long term. The way it's presented, the vast majority of parties will just kill him and take his stuff. Putting the real world politics aside, this is a pretty decent encounter, using the environment and the mobility of the elephant's trample attacks to keep the players on their toes. It shows you don't need spell-like powers to keep a fight from degenerating into a static slugfest until one side runs out of HP. It also reuses background setting details from issue 15's Elephant's Graveyard, making it easy to use in the same campaign. David Howery is definitely proving to be a writer who has topics in his works most of the other authors here don't and returns to them repeatedly.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Dungeon Issue 34: Mar/Apr 1992



part 3/5



Isle of the Abbey: After all that eco-political complexity, let's get back to basics, with a self-contained dungeon crawl for starting level regular D&D characters. A small abbey on a small island that was recently beset by pirates and ruined. Should be some treasure left for intrepid adventurers to find, right? Well, you're not wrong, but there's a lot of twists along the way. First is that the clerics were Chaotic, and guarded the only dock & path to the abbey with exceedingly large numbers of undead lurking just beneath the sand. Unless you heed the environmental clues and follow a very specific winding path, you'll have to fight dozens of them for every square you advance, turning this into a meatgrinder involving a lot of retreating and healing up between expeditions. Once you do get to the abbey, it turns out there are some survivors, but not many and they're pretty low level, they've holed up and gone into full paranoia mode as a result of the recent attacks, and while the map looks fairly square and interconnected, there's actually only one safe route through it from start to end - the rest of the corridors are filled with traps. So this is essentially an old school dungeon where you should be paranoid all the time and prod everything with 10' poles, the monsters mostly stay static in their room until disturbed, and aren't high enough level to have created all the challenges the players are facing, only the writer has gone to considerable lengths to make this setup make sense in terms of backstory, and make it clear that it's a temporary situation created by recent events, not a stable system that'll remain there for centuries if you leave it. The dumb enemies are best outthought rather than outfought at the recommended character level, while many of the intelligent ones can be negotiated with if your reaction roll goes well. It's the kind of starter that's best used if you want your PC's to use their brains if they want to survive, and don't mind killing a few of them first session to make the point clear. Since I have absolutely no problem with that, I approve of this.



As in Dragon & Polyhedron, trading cards are currently the cool new thing to promote, so the centre 4 pages are a cardstock set of 17 characters from their various settings to cut out. Whether you're wandering the Valley of the Mage or up in Wildspace, there's someone interesting for you to run into. Many of them have Kits, which is good to see incorporated. The artwork isn't as good as the first year's though, as it's mostly specifically commissioned for the cards rather than recycled from the past decade of book & magazine covers. That may contribute to diminishing returns in the sales long-term.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Dungeon Issue 34: Mar/Apr 1992



part 4/5



The Lady Rose: Fresh from being praised multiple times in the letters pages, Steven Kurtz has a second adventure to offer us. It's another coastal one, as the PC's are asked for help by a village that has recently been raided by pirates and had a load of it's people kidnapped. The baron is a powerful enough wizard to summon a storm and damage their ship, slowing their retreat, but lacks the manpower to finish them off himself. You need to catch up with them before they can fully repair and get home, at which point fighting them would be much harder and getting all the people back near impossible, as they'll all be sold as slaves to different owners. This is effectively two different combat scenarios, depending whether you catch up with them on land or by sea. Neither of them are easy though, as they have both high level spellcasters that will use their spells to control the terrain and help the grunts, and also higher technology than the average PC, including Giff mercenaries with the stereotypical cannons & blunderbusses. This is reasonably interesting as an individual scenario, but what it really seems to be here for is as a primer to some of his own setting material, a very loosely spanish empire inspired country with a particular fetish for brainwashing and enslaving elves, so the nobles can have well-trained house slaves that stay in the family for generations. Since elves tend to be a bit delicate of constitution and don't breed well in captivity, they need to keep on going out and capturing new ones from increasingly distant places. Well, that's more than a little creepy, and would seriously piss people off if the details were changed to real world ethnicities. So this sees him using themes that he would return too repeatedly in his official books for TSR, that of depraved & decadent empires with advanced magic & technology that will eventually collapse due to their unsustainable & exploitative practices, but not without causing centuries of suffering, and leaving behind lots of ruins that are rich grounds for adventurers to explore & find treasure. He's another writer that definitely has a type, and you can get a lot of good adventures out of building on his ideas. Just remember that these countries are meant to be cautionary tales, not aspirational ones to copy in real life, and work towards transitioning to renewable resources, because dying horribly in the collapse of civilisation when we run out of fossil fuels or something is still pretty unpleasant even when you can have the pyrrhic satisfaction of saying I told you so to all the idiots in your life before you go.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Dungeon Issue 34: Mar/Apr 1992



part 5/5



On Wings of Darkness: We finish up with what initially seems like a simple monster hunting mission, that turns out to be a lot more complicated. The PC's are hired by a Calimshan noble to protect her neighbour's sheep from mysterious nighttime predators, in an attempt to show up how incompetent his own guards are. This does not go as expected. Turns out the sheep ARE the mysterious monsters, being transformed by a wizard into ravening darkenbeasts. Then it turns out that the wizard is not the mastermind of the operation, but a slave of a crystal hypnosis ball owned by a rich merchant. But then it turns out the merchant is actually not that rich, but heavily leveraged with debt, and is planning to get out of it by killing his moneylender, and the person who hired you in the first place was merely incidental collateral damage in that plan. A convoluted scheme with a lot of moving parts, that could easily go wrong. This also applies to the writing of the adventure, which is a fairly linear one that makes a lot of assumptions about the PC's daily habits and transport capabilities, and falls apart if they sleep during the day & travel at night, can fly or teleport and travel between locations significantly faster than expected, etc. So this falls into the category of adventures that make interesting reading, and would be decent if they were a story, but just doesn't stand up against a complex party including things like psionic wild talents and races from the Complete Book of Humanoids, even if they're still of the right average levels. Not one I have any real inclination to actually run.



A pretty interesting issue to read because it brought up a whole load of both real world and fantastical political issues, giving me more to think about than simple assessments of difficulty of challenge and strength of plot. If your campaign becomes more than going into holes in the ground and killing whatever's there, you will need to think about this stuff, so it's helpful to have lots of different perspectives on what your world could be, and how the PC's affect it as they grow more powerful. On we go again to see what perspectives next issue offers us.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 70: April 1992



part 1/5



32 pages. Clyde Caldwell & his girlfriend cosplay for the cover of a magazine for a third time, at the very least. Not quite as many as Larry Elmore & his favourite model, but catching up. So before even starting I'm getting a definite sense of seen it all before. (apart from the bits the outfit just happens to barely cover, due to that pesky code of conduct) Time to see if this issue'll have anything new and interesting to offer, or it's all just a big tease.



Winter Fantasy is the convention that gets a page of photos showing us the interesting outfits the people wore and quite elaborate minis setups they used in their tournaments this time around. The venue must have been well-heated, because whatever the temperature outside, nearly everyone is in t-shirts. Hope that didn't jack up the bills too much.



Notes From HQ: Following straight on from the photos, they have plenty more to say about Winter Fantasy here. The main adventure was suitably icy, and also typically goofy for them, as it was a musical episode involving a singing walrus. The sound of several dozen tables full of nerds of very mixed musical ability trying to improvise their musical responses to the scenario all at once sounds like a very particular nightmare to a pitch-sensitive ear. It also probably contributed to the spread of con flu, which there was also plenty of. Another reason why most conventions are held in the summer months. As if that wasn't enough "comedy" for you, we have yet more reminders that this is the 10th anniversary of Fluffyquest, and Fluffy wants birthday cards! The funnier and more elaborate the better, with the best getting photographed and appearing in future issues. This particular thread of history continues to be deeply irritating and tiresome to read about. Why do they run so much more comedy material than Dragon or Dungeon, and why do I not find it actually funny? What am I missing here?



Letters: The first letter suggests doing a game review column as well as the movie one. They have no particular objection to that, as they've done it before for several years, but can't be bothered to do it in house. If enough people sent them in, they'll print them.

Second is another person complaining about issues damaged in the post. It does seem to be on an upswing lately, so they're going to experiment with the packaging, see if they can get it down again. Curse these sloppy postmen! What's a company got to do to get some respect around here, huh?

Finally, someone wanting to know about the sword from issue 65. It's a big scimitar, what more do you need? Do you want variant stats for every little variant in size and shape? Actually, it looks like lots of people do. Oh well, that just makes for more articles too. Submit away then!
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 70: April 1992



part 2/5



The Everwinking Eye recovers it's definite article. Must have lost it down the back of the sofa or something. Ed decides to take a break from geographical meanderings to tell us about Elminster's pipe. An innocuous enough seeming thing for an old man to have, particularly when you're playing in a system that has no mechanically codified odds for contracting cancer or what it does to your body if you do. But no, it's actually one of his more versatile magical items, with a whole suite of tricks that both make his life more comfortable, and might save it in a pinch. It can automatically light itself on command, it can provide clouds of smoke to obscure an escape, it can shoot mini-fireballs, it can teleport to his hand on command, it can help him breathe underwater, it can even reflect magic missiles. All with considerably less time and obvious signs than casting a spell yourself, as we're also a long way from metamagic feats becoming a thing, so even Elminster can't do that casually yet. This is another interesting demonstration of Ed's all-round inventiveness, showing how Elminster's jovial eccentricity is a cover for all kinds of paranoid tricks that have kept him alive through the centuries. It's also a reminder of how depictions of smoking were common 30 years ago, but have now been banished from both mainstream media and public spaces in general. If you put a pipe smoking wizard in your story these days, it would be a very deliberate choice that would probably be remarked upon by reviewers and internet commenters. It's the little details like that which make the difference between something written decades ago, and a historical pastiche merely set in the past. All in all, a very thought-provoking article indeed.



Sea of Fire pt 2: Having spent a session showing you the effects of prolonged drought on an ecosystem, part two of the adventure ironically does the exact opposite. Now they've reached the source of the river and found it was diverted through a magic portal, the PC's follow it to the other side and find themselves in the middle of Wa, which is now rapidly flooding, and the Wu Jen who created the portal has no interest in shutting it off again, having long since taken his payment and left. You'll need to get to his tower fairly quickly, as every day that passes, both the people with too much and too little water will be having increasingly rough times. As with the first instalment, this is structured as a linear sequence of encounters, but at least gives you a decent mix of combat ones and puzzles and the freedom to solve them in different ways, and isn't filled with obnoxious comedy to undercut the stakes. The final encounter does a particularly interesting example of this, as the Wu Jen's unethical experiments in pursuit of immortality attracts the Dark Powers of Ravenloft, so if you aren't quick and careful, you can wind up being sucked into the mists with him, which will leave you alive and quite possibly able to still defeat him, but completely unable to complete your original mission, and with much bigger problems long term. That's an interesting twist, particularly when used with players who are sufficiently knowledgable OOC to understand the foreshadowing and realise the danger they're in. While I'd still prefer a good sandbox, this is pretty near the top quality I've seen for linear tournament adventures, and very usable in campaign play as well. If only we were seeing more serious challenges and fewer adventures that are basically just 4 hour comedy routines in here.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 70: April 1992



part 3/5



The Living City 1: Another month, another business run by an ex-adventurer with a dark past that might come back to haunt them. Kavan Brenzan is a low level Illusionist who uses his spells to liven up the signs of many of the other businesses around here. Because the sea air is rough on wood and paintwork, he has plenty of repeat customers who need things touched up every few years. He's quiet and keeps odd hours, but as long as he does the job well no-one really minds. The twist is one more commonly found in superhero stories than fantasy ones, as he was captured by the Zhentarim and experimented upon, giving him regeneration by splicing him with troll blood. He was rescued by a mysterious heroic Drow (now who could that be? :) ) and is quite understandably somewhat traumatised and paranoid they're going to catch up with him some day. Not everyone who gains superpowers from secret government experiments is of the right mindset to dress in a spandex costume and fight crime with them, plus a singular power like that is less of an edge in a world full of weirdness and monsters like Toril. This is another pretty decent entry with a very obvious adventure hook embedded, as you don't even need to have a sign painted yourself to be in the vicinity when the Zhents catch up with him, giving you an easy opportunity to be a hero and get entangled in further conflicts involving them. The easier you make it, the more likely DM's are to use it in their home campaign, and this is particularly strong on that front.



Pod Mutation Increases: Hmm. another of those rare instances where Polyhedron covers something Dragon never did. In 1987 TSR released Gammamarauders, a wargame system that tied into Gamma World 3e. It got one supplement and a tie-in comic book series, but wargaming was well in decline in general by then so apparently it never got that much of a fanbase. But one person cares enough to submit a trio of new scenarios for the game (which are also fairly easy to expand into RPG ones as well.) As usual for Gamma World, the premises are wacky, but the stakes are very real indeed, as you're playing with much higher-powered creatures than you usually see on the RPG side. It reminds me of the differences between Warhammer Fantasy as a wargame & an RPG, where you casually get to pull out monsters & powers that are depicted as rare & terrifying in setting, requiring years of XP if you ever get to use them as a PC at all. It's pretty interesting, and shows that this obscure game was at least more loved by the readers than Buck Rogers or Indiana Jones, which still have a big fat total of 0 reader submitted articles. Whether that difference is enough to get a game going online in the present day is another matter, but hey, it's worth a shot.



With Great Power: Having just seen an intrusion of superheroics into Toril, the superhero column does the opposite, and asks what people with superpowers would do in a more realistic world where they don't naturally form into clean lines of heroes and villains and fight each other for the fate of humanity. There's a lot of jobs they could earn more than enough money at legitimately using their powers, with much less stress than being constantly in and out of superjail or worrying about holding down a normal job and preserving their secret identity while moonlighting as a costumed crimefighter. As with the recent one on grim & gritty heroes, this shows them tiring of the superhero comic formula while still being interested in the idea of people with superpowers and getting increasingly deconstructive. That's also going to get increasingly common in the next few years, with games like White Wolf's Aberrant exploring the ramifications of superpowered beings forming societies and having real long term impacts on the setting & technological development of the world that aren't reset at the end of the story. More signs of wider historical progress here that would be a whole other interesting field of study in themselves. Just watch out for the multiple collectible hologram covers, those things can be real budget drainers.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 70: April 1992



part 4/5



The Living Galaxy: Roger gives us another article that is basically just a series of references. He looks at pretty much all the sci-fi RPG's on the market at the moment, and tells us his favourite parts from them. Each offers different ideas on how to build characters, and what kinds of personalities they might have, and some have more sophisticated stuff as well, such as Twilight 2000's extensive set of building plans or Traveller's guide to Startowns and how living in a port affects the economy & lifestyle. If you take all the best bits and put them together they become stronger than any one individually. Another reminder that the universe is a mind-bogglingly massive place, and if you want to represent it accurately, you need to do a lot of research, get perspectives from all kinds of viewpoints. He can point you in the right direction, but ultimately, you have to put the work in yourself if you're not running prefab adventures. (and even then, knowing more about a setting is handy if they stray from the expected route & plot choices.) Not straying that far from formula then, leaving this pretty middle of the road in terms of usefulness.



The Living City 2: The second Raven's bluff article this issue is also filled with opportunities for adventure. 5 years doing this, you'd think they'd have thought about what kind of emergency services they have here sooner. The fire services turn out to be one of those areas where they use magic to simulate earthly technology, with a decanter of endless water to keep the pressure up on their water supplies. They're called the Red Ravens, which isn't just a figure of speech, as they have a wereraven member who's trained a whole flock of regular ravens to act as their lookouts and early response team, spotting fires and making it obvious from far away where they are so their wagons can get there quickly and actually save some of the property instead of just mopping up and preventing it from spreading throughout the whole city. Their fire-resistant work clothes also look somewhat like ravens, with large beaked helmets filled with stuff to filter out smoke. (the fact that it looks similar to real world plague doctor masks is an added bonus, and not a co-incidence at all) Because firefighting is not a full-time occupation, and also because the Forgotten Realms has it's share of dickishly evil people who will start fires and then attack anyone trying to put them out, this outfit also serves to conceal their identities so it's harder to attack them when they're off duty in retaliation. So this is an interesting mix of stuff that approximates modern technology, and fantastical elements that show an alternate path to accomplishing the same goals in a world full of adventurers and monsters that make those adventurers a necessity. It also has more than a little superhero genre influence, and would be very easy for heroic PC's to join to give them new adventure opportunities and the gear to have a decent shot at accomplishing them. If this were 3e, they'd almost definitely have their own prestige class. Definitely feels like you could get a lot of use out of this one as a campaign framework if you wanted too, so this gets my approval.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 70: April 1992



part 5/5



Into the Dark: James chooses another exceedingly specific topic this time that I'm surprised has enough to fill a column. Movies about Sinbad?! I guess he is a reasonably popular literary figure, and like King Arthur or Robin Hood, he is public domain, so anyone can make movies about him without worrying about licensing. But like Westerns, the number of movies about him has dropped in recent decades, as you can no longer cast any random white guy as a middle-eastern character without complaints. Looking at the cast lists of these 5, they are indeed not only all starring white guys, but all different ones even when they're by the same company and intended to be an actual sequel, which tells you exactly how much Hollywood cared about both cultural accuracy and internal continuity back then, with no army of internet nerds making wikis for every successful franchise and mercilessly picking over any inconsistencies. So yeah, this is all stuff that hasn't aged well, and the fact they're using it to cross-promote Al Qadim reminds us that setting was also more based on western pop-cultural depictions of Arabia than primary sources, and also probably hasn't aged well 30 years later. This is probably going to involve large quantities of cringe.

The 7th Voyage of Sinbad is the oldest of these, but also curiously one of the best, as it was the one that started the trend in the first place. Ray Harryhausen's stop-motion special effects were groundbreaking at the time, and still hold up better than many later films using the same techniques. The human element isn't quite as great, and there's some cheaply recycled stock footage to cut corners, but at least it's still watchable today.

Captain Sinbad has a more convincingly dashing swashbuckling lead than the previous film, but pretty much everything else is worse. It's still watchable in a B-movie way, but nothing worth tracking down if you're already on the fence about the whole premise.

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad is the other one that James thinks is actually good. Future Dr Who Tom Baker makes for a suitably melodramatic villain, the script is on point, and the rest of the cast do their jobs pretty well too. If you watch just one of these, it should probably be this one.

Sinbad & the Eye of the Tiger :guitar riff intensifies: fails to live up to it's awesome name, with distinctly wooden acting, and effects that are worse than 20 years ago despite being done by the same people. Stop motion takes time and precision, so a rushed shooting schedule is just the worst idea with it.

Sinbad of the 7 Seas is by far both the most recent of these and the worst. Lou Ferrigno as Sinbad is a miscasting for the ages and the rest of the production values are on the same level. Only remotely tolerable with a little help from the MST3K puppets.



GEnie And The Network: The RPGA continues to be rather more online savvy than the rest of TSR. They've had a message board for several years, and now they've made it possible for you to sign up and renew subscriptions entirely online. No more postage fees just to communicate at all or not getting your first issue until several months after you sent off the application. I suspect it'll probably still be several years before online applications overtake physical ones and email communications about submissions put the no SASE ogre out of a job, but it's good to see them thinking ahead. The price per hour to use their network & message boards has dropped again, and is actually free to regional directors and club heads, so they can set up regular meetings where they debate RPGA policy with members across the globe in real time. All stuff that would be routine now (although setting a good meeting time with members from lots of timezones never ceases to be a pain) and another reminder of how much our everyday lives have changed in a few decades. One of those bits of progress I can be unreservedly positive about.




Bloodmoose & Company can't resist making Doctor Who jokes, even at the expense of continuity. Well, they just got a time machine, so it comes with the territory. Just don't paradox yourself out of existence and things'll all work out in the end.



A second issue that's well above average for both usability and historical progress in a row, which is quite nice to see. Every little change brings us closer to the present, and this time, the changes are the ones that I'd like to see. Of course there are also plenty of ways things have got worse since then. Let's see if next issue has anything to do with those.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 71: May 1992



part 1/5



34 pages. Another demonstration of caster supremacy over fighters. Once you get a few levels under your belt, you can buff all your physical stats and effortlessly outlift & outrun the people who spent years training the hard way, and also be able to control minds, change shapes, fly & all that jazz they can't even begin to replicate. A common complaint in most editions of D&D, particularly as the number of supplements builds up. Let's see if what's inside further increases that disparity.



The consistent cavalcade of contests continues. This month's is for game designers. It's very specific. Design an adventure with precisely 6 encounters, 5 of which must fit specific categories & final one a wild card. This pretty much forces the adventures to be short and linear, which is the way they seem to like them, and I'm really not very fond of. I know you have to fit them into 4 hour slots, but even that format doesn't necessitate this degree of formulaicness. This seems likely to encourage people to submit more linear and predictable adventures that fall apart if the players exercise too much creativity in the future, which is a bad sign.



Notes From HQ: Another year, another editorial talking about the good the RPGA does on top of their gaming. Once again they're running charity benefit tournaments to raise money for for guide dogs. You can choose between a Spelljammer one, or, very fittingly, a Fluffyquest one. This suggests that both of these adventure incline even more towards the comedic than usual for the RPGA, and are primarily a way to blow off steam and feel like you're supporting a good cause than any serious tactical challenge for your characters. If they ever get reprinted here I doubt I'll be giving them very high ratings. Oh well, I can't do anything about it, and thinking about it more will just irritate, so let's move on and deal with that if it happens.



Letters: The first two letters both complain that GM's don't get prizes for being highly rated by their players in the same way as the other way around. They do more work than the players, so surely they should get some reward. They tried it recently, but found it actually created perverse incentives that reduced the total number of games they could run, as GM's only wanted the groups that are likely to get them the best scores, and would simply drop out of the less prestigious single-round games or go easy on the players in hopes of getting better votes instead of running the enemies smartly. They're forced to conclude it's a bad idea.

The final one tackles a similarly divisive topic. The RPGA as a whole has no problem with kids joining, but many individual clubs do. Be it an issue of playstyles when a group has people of vastly different ages, or wanting to avoid even the appearance of recruiting for the purposes of pederasty, there are good reasons why you might enforce an age limit, but at the same time, if you reject them from gaming altogether, you hurt the long-term health of the hobby. Maybe they should create a separate young gamer's tournament division? This definitely feels like it needs a few more opinions before they make a firm decision.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 71: May 1992



part 2/5



Highlander: In issue 62 they put a dashing bekilted adventurer on the cover and asked the readers to come up with stats & adventure ideas involving him. Now they tell us the winners, and publish the top two here. The first one has him cast as a robin hood-esque space pirate in Spelljammer. He only robs from the rich and gives to the poor, (although if the PC's can afford their own ship, that definitely puts them in the rich category) and is quick to help if any genuine villains cause trouble while he's around. He could easily wind up as ally or enemy, depending on how forgiving the PC's are feeling after the first encounter. A nice reminder that it's quite possible for Good parties to come into conflict in D&D, particularly once you get to higher levels and the question of what action would be the greater good arises.

Second place is somewhat more unusual. In this one, he's a centuries old scottish mutant with the power to temporarily warp the environment around him and everything in it into a facsimile of the scottish highlands. This has a lot of range and flexibility, making him a threat on a similar level to Wandavision, only everything turns into it's scottish equivalent instead of a sitcom. (which will still probably put a serious crimp in any tech based PC's style in particular) Once again, he's technically a good guy, but in the great Marvel tradition is terrible at explaining his motives (not helped by the thick accent of course) and so the PC's will probably wind up fighting him before realising he's not the true enemy and teaming up to take down the big bad. This all seems like it has a lot of potential for hamming up the roleplaying aspect and coming up with inventive power stunts. If I was doing the judging, this would be first place and the other one bumped down a notch.



Fluffynoia: They've been threatening it since the start of the year. Now it's time for the first of our 10th anniversary fluffyquest presents. The small white adorable dog mysteriously turns up in Alpha Complex, which causes quite the kerfuffle, because they thought most animals were extinct. A search of the computer's archives reveals that this is one of the few things that is not actually a traitorous commie mutant, but a loyal friend to mankind. Before you know it everyone is trying to get their hands on Fluff-Y, so their secret society can be the one that clones it and has all the best friends. The PC's get called to troubleshoot the situation and restore proper order, making absolutely certain the dog survives, and all commie mutant traitors involved get what they deserve. They pick up a fairly typical set of experimental dog-catching items and weapons of dubious reliability, picking up treason points along the way if they don't use exactly the right procedures, and set off. This leads them on a wild chase through several locations filled with typically zany options for roleplaying or fighting, which culminates in a giant food fight between all the factions trying to dognap Fluff-Y in an infrared cafeteria where the pies are heavily laced with drugs. Hopefully the PC's will be the last ones standing, but if not, higher clearance troubleshooters will show up and ensure there's something resembling a happy ending, for the dog at least. It's both zany and short, and seems unlikely to last a full 4 hour tournament slot unless the PC's spend more time betraying each other than following the plot. (gee, what are the odds?) It's less grating and railroaded than it's D&D siblings, probably because it's not written by original creator Rick Reid, but still only tolerable if you go into it knowing it's going to be all terrible puns and real world references and calibrate your own playing accordingly. I'd give it a miss if it was the only gaming on offer.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 71: May 1992



part 3/5



Fluffy Trivia: Following straight on, we see that Rick Reid is still personally involved with his creation, not just a licensor, with a quiz on the things that happened in all the previous adventures over the years. Who were the villains, what magical items have you got to wield, what monsters did you fight, what gods do the clerics worship, etc. Send in your answers and you could win a chance to play with Rick in Fluffy's next adventure at Gen Con! Just looking at the possible answers makes me roll my eyes. I know the answers to none of these questions, and I'm quite happy for that state of affairs to continue. I doubt the fate of the world will ever hinge on my knowledge of comedy RPG module trivia and I shudder to imagine the kind of truly despicable villain who would engineer that situation. Unless we are thrown into that crisis I shall continue to fill my mind with other areas of knowledge instead.



The Everwinking Eye: Instead of geographical meanderings, Ed casts his mind back in time, to that brief period when gods roamed the earth, and it was possible, if tricky to kill them permanently. Lots of things happened during the time of troubles, many already detailed in the books, but there's always someone you forget or had to cut for the sake of the page count. So here's stats and goals for the avatars of Beshaba, Tymora & Iyachtu Xvim, in case your players want to fight them for whatever reason. (or don't get given the choice) They're all on the weaker end of the godly spectrum, but still not something you've got a chance against unless you've got a decent sized party of double digit level characters. The kinds of thing that's interesting to completionists, but probably not going to be useful in many actual games, particularly with the increased hostility towards ideas of direct encounters with the gods in the 2e products. This mainly serves as another demonstration of Ed's attention to detail and tendency to create things just for the love of it, even if there isn't any particular story involved … yet. You never know, you might get something out of it in the long run. Just make sure you keep your indexing up to date so it doesn't stall play looking these guys up if it suddenly becomes relevant.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 71: May 1992



part 4/5



The Living Galaxy: After several rather ambitious game ideas, Roger decides to scale things down and remind us that it's quite possible to run an entire campaign on a single planet. In fact, in any other genre, that would be the norm, and might be further restricted to a single country or even city. It could be a cyberpunk game rather than straight sci-fi, you could be pioneers going years at a time between new arrivals from the motherworld, you could be marooned and trying to survive until you can make repairs or someone answers your distress call, or you could be trying to hunt down the X golden macguffins that will give you ULTIMATE POWER!!! (which are conveniently all on one planet) As usual, he has plenty of examples of each from literature & movies to draw upon, so you'll never be short of options if you follow them up. There can be considerably more discreet locations to explore and creatures to interact with on a small moon than billions of miles of interstellar space. Basically, it isn't size that matters, it's what you do with it. As usual for this column, this is competent, but not particularly groundbreaking. You'll probably need to heed it at some point because no system supports things getting more epic indefinitely. (although some last many orders of magnitude longer than others) Let the playing field be small for a while, and it'll have more impact when big things happen again.



Into the Dark: No theme this month. Instead, James is reviewing a motley collection of films recommended to him by the other TSR staff. Hopefully this means the quality will be slightly higher than average, although these things remain pretty subjective, so just because they liked it (or at least found it bad in an interesting way) doesn't mean he will.

Legend sees Ridley Scott try his hand at fantasy, having recently been responsible for sci-fi classics Alien & Blade Runner. The result is not quite so successful or well remembered decades later. Tim Curry is perfectly cast as the Dark Lord, and the lighting, makeup & camera work is excellent, but the plot is just the same old "save the unicorns!" tripe filled with comic relief fairy characters, so many comic relief fairy characters, including an inexplicably horny ancestor of Navi. :shudders: He needs to pick his scriptwriters better.

The Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires sees Hammer studios try to mix their horror bread & butter with martial arts noodles, or some similarly tortured metaphor. This is precisely as uneven as it sounds, with lots of cool elements that don't blend together very well. It did nothing to prevent their eventual demise.

Gor the movie lives down to it's source material quite effectively, with a "hero" who ignores most of the injustices and sexism of the world he winds up in, and is basically replacing one naughty word leader with another. Most of the people involved seem to know exactly what level of turkey they're dealing with, and the acting suffers accordingly. Not the kind of property I feel like supporting, even ironically.

Outlaw of Gor is the even worse sequel, rushed out straight after the first one. You wouldn't think they'd suffer from diminishing returns when the bar was already that low, but I guess you can always scrape the bottom of the barrel a little more. I pity the executive who greenlighted this thinking they were getting the next Conan.

A Chinese Ghost Story reminds us that asia produces plenty of home-grown horror that mixes stuff from their mythology with scares & gore more effectively than western bandwagon-jumpers. Just watch out for the subs vs dubs purists because those wars can be as terrifying as what's actually being portrayed on the screen. Fortunately, this one manages to be quite clear about what's going on without either.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Polyhedron Issue 71: May 1992



part 5/5



Role Reversal: We finish up with a fairly large and complex crossword puzzle with much fewer black spaces than most newspaper ones, so any mistakes will become obvious fairly quickly. Another thing to fill a few hours pondering over, that'll prove pretty insoluble if your nerd references aren't fairly broad. Interesting to see, but doesn't give me much to comment upon.



Bloodmoose & Company remind us how bad invasive species can be for a planet's ecosystem.



An issue that was very heavy indeed on the comedic side of their tournament gaming, not only showcasing it, but actively encouraging other people to write adventures in a style I find grating and unchallenging. It once again makes me marvel at how the different TSR periodicals have wound up with such different tastes in adventures. Oh well, I guess gaming is a broad church, and more variety means someone somewhere is getting something out of it. Time to hop over to the side that is definitely proving more useful to me as time goes on again.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Dungeon issue 35: May/Jun 1992



part 1/5



76 pages. Looks like we're in a gothic mood again, with a very painterly cover of a young wizard, his eye of agamoto, and a ghost. What challenges will they have for us to get our acting and dice-rolling muscles into this time, and how much choice will they offer the players to influence the final outcome of the story? Time for another selection of short adventures to get stuck into, and decide if I'd ever like to play.



Editorial: This is another round of the specific settings vs generic. Safe to say there's still plenty of strong opinions coming in on both sides of the fence so the overall policy of one per issue hasn't changed. What they are doing is elaborating on the specifics. Oriental adventures are out, arabian adventures are in, as they've only get the energy to care about one group of token non-white characters at a time. Way to say the quiet part loud guys. Meanwhile, despite having the same absence of submissions for basic D&D, they're still trying to make that happen, so they'll give preferential treatment to any you do send in, hint hint. They do have a few Spelljammer, Ravenloft & Dragonlance adventures in the pipeline, but wouldn't be averse to more. Forgotten Realms continues to be plentiful to the point where it counts as generic. No great surprises then, apart from definitively cancelling OA instead of just letting it trickle to a halt for lack of submissions. They never said that in Dragon, and checking my reviews did publish a couple of OA articles next year. First sign of creative differences between Roger & Barbara. That is interesting to note.



Letters: First two letters are aggressively negative on the idea of adventures involving specific settings or non-D&D systems. They also contain factual errors, which Barbara delights in pointing out to them. You going to try make the magazine more boring, you'd best come correct.

Third praises putting posters in the magazine. They put it up on their wall, so keep it up.

4th reminds them that too many specific settings is bad for sales. They know. Doesn't mean they don't have to juggle their own boredom with the need to make money.

5th is Randy Maxwell, pointing out another cartographic error in one of his adventures that somehow made it to print. It won't break the adventure, but it does ruin the point of the room a bit.

6th praises their recent covers and the scrapbook, and wonders why they run so many adverts for the American Heart Association. Are gamers that much more of a risk than the general population? Probably not yet, but give it a few decades. :p Maybe cut down on the mountain dew a little bit and mix up the tabletop & LARP stuff some more.

7th has lots of questions. They all get mostly sensible answers. They're doing their best to please.

8th is Steve Kurtz, also complaining that the cartographer made mistakes on the Lady Rose. Diesel had better watch out or they'll dock his pay.

9th also praises their recent poster and wants more, and asks if they're doing anything viking related. Why sure. That doesn't involve any brown people, so it falls into the generic category for purposes of accepting submissions.

10th praises isle of the Abbey. Another satisfied customer.

11th reminds us day lengths vary with season, affecting travel times. Greyhawk is a geocentric solar system, so it might not work quite the same way there, but the general reminder is solid. All depends if you're playing a gritty enough game to trouble with all those little modifiers.

12th reminds us that a picture is worth a thousand words, and several early modules like Tomb of Horrors & Shrine of Tamochan featured full galleries of them. Maybe they should go back to the old school and do that for some in here. It would cost a little more, but they don't flat out say no to the idea.

13th likes the trading cards. Why thank you. More coming next year! :teeth ting:

14th complains about the lack of basic D&D material. They know. They've got none in their slush pile at the moment and they've been complaining about this problem for years. Doesn't matter if the demand is there, if the supply isn't there's nothing they can do. You write some if you care so much.

Finally, a complaint about inconsistencies between FR9 and the core Forgotten Realms map. It wasn't written by Ed, so it's subordinate to any material that was. Curse these incompetent lesser sages! Don't know why we keep them around.
 

(un)reason

Adventurer
Dungeon issue 35: May/Jun 1992



part 2/5



Twilight's Last Gleaming: James Jacobs continues to appear more frequently in here than he will for a long time in Dragon. it starts with a premise we've seen a couple of times before in here, that of a gloomy pass through rough mountains that is also an important trade route, making it easy pickings for any monsters who can control the high grounds and ambush travellers. The PC's get asked to clear it out. This does not turn out like the previous times, however, but leads into a far more epic plot in which a Rakshasa imprisoned in the demiplane of shadow seeks his freedom. Through a convoluted series of events, the artifact binding him's power was weakened, but not broken, so his spirit could leave and possess people, but despite being considerably less vulnerable in this state he'd still prefer his original body back. You get manipulated into going there and freeing him. Presuming you follow the exposition without getting suspicious of course, as there are some clues that this isn't entirely legit if you keep your eyes open. But even if you do, that won't ruin the challenge, merely shift the grounds you fight it on, and maybe skip some of the middle encounters. A pretty interesting adventure, with my main complaint being that it's too small, and feels like it was originally a much larger story that was heavily hacked down in editing. With a well-fleshed out antagonist like this, which has the potential to be the big bad for a whole campaign, it's a shame to throw them away after a session or two of adventure. It makes me itch for the future issues where they will embrace the idea of multi-part adventure paths where you can foreshadow the big bad long in advance, instead of having to tweak a bunch of small adventures to make them seem like a bigger whole post-hoc. Better press on if I want to get to the years he's staff instead of just a freelancer in a decent amount of time then.
 

Level Up!

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top