• The VOIDRUNNER'S CODEX is coming! Explore new worlds, fight oppressive empires, fend off fearsome aliens, and wield deadly psionics with this comprehensive boxed set expansion for 5E and A5E!

D&D 5E My D&D Next Experience at DDXP

Grazzt

Demon Lord
When we have our convention here almost no one is playing 4e. Most are playing White Wolf, Cyberpunk, Pathfinder, or 3e. The ads for more players at the local gaming stores, and the community events for D&D have a real high 3e percentage. 3E seems to be the most popular D&D edition over here, but that might be a regional thing.

Same here. Not so much Cyberpunk though (that I remember seeing lately), but definitely PF, 3.x, White Wolf, and Warhammer (lots of Warhammer around here). Very little if any 4e that I've seen.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Fanaelialae

Legend
I'll reserve final judgement till I see actual mechanics, but this really concerns me that WotC is throwing out the 4e baby with the bath water.

Trying to outdo Pathfinder by going back to 3e era mechanics is a doomed business model. Those Pathfinder guys have it pretty good with Paizo, there is little reason for them to switch back. The 1e/2e superfans is an extremely small niche market who are mostly satisfied with the books they already have, and they also have Castles and Crusades and a horde of retroclones.

Unification is nice, and if you can make an edition that pulls back in some of those lapsed fans, great. I'm all for inclusion and making as many people happy as possible. But you MUST keep your 4e base happy, WotC.

Your bread and butter are the 4e fans. They're generating revenue and keeping your lights on now, WotC. Not in some marketer's hypothetical future vision of all D&D fans suddenly coming "home" again.

If you lose even half of those customers, I doubt you'll pick up enough returnees to make up the difference, and 5e will be DOA.

I wouldn't worry about this too much. From the sound of things, the 4e parts are more likely to be modular. Which makes sense when you think about it. They want to add more complex modular parts to a simple core, so it makes more sense to start with a 1e/Basic core and add options until you have 4e.

I think you have to distinguish between 4e fans and hardcore 4e fans. The former group will probably be willing to give 5e a fair shake; depending on the mechanics, and how far they diverge from 4e, the latter group might not. The hardcore fans of any edition are (IMO) the exception rather than the rule. They're the ones that are most likely to be left behind, because they're a relatively small group and have a long list of deal-breakers that make it difficult for a designer to satisfy them while still keeping everyone else happy. (Note, not everyone who doesn't convert is a hardcore fan; many non-hardcore may have stuck with 3e (for example) because they decided they enjoy it more than 4e, but will still be willing to try 5e and see if they like that more.)

As long as they make a game that pleases most peoples' gaming sensibilities, I think they'll have a hit on their hands regardless of whether or not they leave out rule X.
 

mkill

Adventurer
For example, one could build a small value-added domain/sphere effect into spells, and just make sure the cleric has access to it under the right circumstances? (This is basically what I do in my homebrew game.)
I was thinking something much more simple. You don't put "Cure X Wounds" on the spell list. Instead, 1st-level Clerics get their spell slots, and one use of "Cure Light Wounds" per day. As they go up in levels, they get more spell slots, and more Cures. If you want more healing, spend feats on it or pick the healing domain (or both).

That way, Clerics don't get under pressure to play the healbot. I'd argue that for most parties, an active cleric with buffs and save-or-dies is more effective anyway.
 

Dragonblade

Adventurer
Fact that 5E is coming, and coming soon/now, says otherwise.

Yes and no. WotC effectively lost half their customer base to Pathfinder and various OGL clones and they want them back. 5e is an attempt to get them back.

I applaud that goal if it results in better D&D for everyone. But I think getting even half those players back will be a challenge no matter what 5e looks like. And if it comes at the expense of the customers they currently have, then I would question whether they have accomplished anything at all.

I hope I'm wrong and they make everyone happy. :)
 

Raith5

Adventurer
I wouldn't worry about this too much. From the sound of things, the 4e parts are more likely to be modular. Which makes sense when you think about it. They want to add more complex modular parts to a simple core, so it makes more sense to start with a 1e/Basic core and add options until you have 4e.

I have problems with the premise that 4th is complex and previous editions of D&D are simple. It makes 4th ed sound like the Kama sutra!

I just dont think it that complicated a system. I have seen people with little gaming experience understand and play it quite quickly. It alienated (too) many play styles, to be sure, they changed too many archetypes (like druids etc) and some players found it hard to accept the high fantasy assumptions of it, but the underlying mechanics and structure are pretty simple and uniform. 4th ed is just a different kind of simplicity.
 

Ainamacar

Adventurer
I was thinking something much more simple. You don't put "Cure X Wounds" on the spell list. Instead, 1st-level Clerics get their spell slots, and one use of "Cure Light Wounds" per day. As they go up in levels, they get more spell slots, and more Cures. If you want more healing, spend feats on it or pick the healing domain (or both).

That way, Clerics don't get under pressure to play the healbot. I'd argue that for most parties, an active cleric with buffs and save-or-dies is more effective anyway.

That certainly could work as well. I see the healbot issue as one of supply and demand. One can carefully limit the supply (as you suggest) to prevent the healbot effect. This doesn't actually reduce demand, but it does make badgering the cleric for healing every round pointless. I, however, also think it's sufficient to lessen the relative demand on the cleric by making sure other classes have healing abilities, so even if the cleric has increased supply from spontaneous casting or spell preparation there is less pressure to use it any given round. Both approaches have implications for other parts of the game, of course, and aren't mutually exclusive. 4e both spreads healing around and put pretty firm limits on it.

My primary goal for clerics and priests (besides basic mechanical competence) is robust customization based on deity, so it is natural for me to try and address healing issues in that same mold. My suggestion may be more complex, but the goal is quite a bit larger than just letting the player customize their healing capabilities. I also admit a preference toward pre-4e spells, so the notion of cure as not-a-spell is a little unsatisfying to me despite its practicality.

In any case, that some solution is implemented is more important to me than its details. We'll see what the playtest brings!
 

Number48

First Post
Back to interrogating the playtesters. Now, without asking specifics, did you get a good feel from your character sheet what on it was from race, class or theme?
 

Charleois

First Post
As far as playability, that entirely depends on the rule modules. The the base game really tires to capture a 1E/2E feel; I left that style of play behind a long time ago, and have never really looked back.

I wonder how close this new stuff is to Essentials. Even Essentials though was built within a wider system of great variety of options for actions.
 

pemerton

Legend
Monte is an excellent DM and he made the adventure fun and engaging. We won the day, kicking a lot of orc butt through luck, bold tactics, and good ideas. That said, a good DM can make just about any system enjoyable, for a while at least. About mid-way through I started to get bored with my character (and I normally love rogues) and my mind wandered.
Monte Cook has always been characterised as a good GM. If you got bored in his game, that makes me worry about the system.

Monte kept trying to reinforce that we could do anything and not worry about what our character sheets said, but ultimately what we did we didn't particularly do well.
A familiar experience for me from classic D&D play. Especially at low levels.

The base game seems very targeted towards a particular group
there was definitely an edition that seemed to be the "go to" edition for rules.
The the base game really tires to capture a 1E/2E feel; I left that style of play behind a long time ago, and have never really looked back.
This confirms the impression that I've been getting to date from the designers' comments.
 

pemerton

Legend
this really concerns me that WotC is throwing out the 4e baby with the bath water.

<snip>

Unification is nice, and if you can make an edition that pulls back in some of those lapsed fans, great. I'm all for inclusion and making as many people happy as possible. But you MUST keep your 4e base happy, WotC.
I've been having these thoughts for a while - that the unity edition seems to be a reactionary edition.

I wouldn't worry about this too much. From the sound of things, the 4e parts are more likely to be modular. Which makes sense when you think about it. They want to add more complex modular parts to a simple core, so it makes more sense to start with a 1e/Basic core and add options until you have 4e.

I think you have to distinguish between 4e fans and hardcore 4e fans.

<snip>

As long as they make a game that pleases most peoples' gaming sensibilities, I think they'll have a hit on their hands regardless of whether or not they leave out rule X.
I probably count as a hardcore 4e fan - it brought me back to GMing D&D after close to 20 years away from GMing it, and playing it only on and off in that time. And I'm curious about how modules will be designed that turn a Basic or simple AD&D game into a 4e one. Classic D&D is built around assumptions about operational play, for example, that don't figure in 4e. In other words, 4e is much more than just balanced maths.

These WotC people are clever designers, but can they square the circle?
 

Remove ads

Top